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Diabetes Food Check: Eat Apples & Avocados, Junk Most Things White

Diabetes Food Check: Eat Apples & Avocados, Junk Most Things White

Diabetes Food Check: Eat Apples & Avocados, Junk Most Things White The life you lead and the food you eat are two important factors when it comes to diabetes. Both play a role for those who are already battling it and for those who remain vulnerable to it. Whole foods that are not processed should always be on the menu. But also remember that some items have to be away from the dining table if you want to steer clear of diabetes. Additionally, avoid special diets and stick to what you make at home. Just follow the basic rules like keeping a constant calorie count during meals. Apples & Avocados A Day Really Do Keep The Doctor Away /magazines/panache/diabetes-food-check-eat-apples-avocados-junk-most-things-white/apples-avocados-a-day-really-do-keep-the-doctor-away/slideshow/61639263.cms Apples & Avocados A Day Really Do Keep The Doctor Away A hypoglycaemic fruit, Apple is rich in fibre and an impeccable ingredient for a diabetic. It also contains Pectin, that helps reduce blood sugar levels and the requirement of insulin in the body by almost 50 per cent. There is even a connection between avocados and diabetes. According to a study by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, women who consume good fats (found in avocados) are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Containing alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which can be converted into omega-3 fatty acids, Flaxseeds offer benefits similar to consuming fish. They are also a good source of lignans and antioxidants. According to the National Institutes of Health, flaxseeds may help in lowering hemoglobin A1C in people with type 2 diabetes. Another study shows that when people with type 2 diabetes include flaxseeds in their diet, blood glucose levels decrease. So whether you add it to your cereal, on salads, or whip up a smo Continue reading >>

The Apple Watch Can Detect Diabetes With An 85% Accuracy, Cardiogram Study Says

The Apple Watch Can Detect Diabetes With An 85% Accuracy, Cardiogram Study Says

According to Cardiogram founder Brandon Ballingers latest clinical study, the Apple Watch can detect diabetes in those previously diagnosed with the disease with an 85 percent accuracy. The study is part of the larger DeepHeart study with Cardiogram and UCSF. This particular study used data from 14,000 Apple Watch users and was able to detect that 462 of them had diabetes by using the Watchs heart rate sensor, the same type of sensor other fitness bands using Android Wear also integrate into their systems. In 2015, the Framingham Heart Study showed that resting heart rate and heart rate variability significantly predicted incident diabetes and hypertension. This led to the impetus to use the Watchs heart rate sensor to see if it could accurately detect a diabetic patient. Previously, Ballinger and his colleagues were able to use Apples Watch to detect an abnormal heart rhythm with up to a 97 percent accuracy, sleep apnea with a 90 percent accuracy and hypertension with an 82 percent accuracy when paired with Cardiograms AI-based algorithm. Most of these discoveries have been published in clinical journals or abstracts and Ballinger intends to publish the latest findings shortly after presenting at the AAAI 2018 conference this week. Diabetes is a huge and growing problem in the U.S. More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with pre-diabetes or diabetes and more than 1 in 4 of them go undiagnosed, according to the CDC. Part of the problem is the pain that goes into checking blood glucose levels. A patient must prick themselves after every meal and correctly take the right amount of insulin to keep themselves in balance. Early detection could also help in cutting down on diabetes-related diseases before they get out of hand. While there have been other attempts t Continue reading >>

Apple Has A Secret Team Working On The Holy Grail For Treating Diabetes

Apple Has A Secret Team Working On The Holy Grail For Treating Diabetes

Apple has hired a small team of biomedical engineers to work at a nondescript office in Palo Alto, California, miles from corporate headquarters. They are part of a super secret initiative, initially envisioned by the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, to develop sensors that can noninvasively and continuously monitor blood sugar levels to better treat diabetes, according to three people familiar with the matter. Such a breakthrough would be a "holy grail" for life sciences. Many life sciences companies have tried and failed, as it's highly challenging to track glucose levels accurately without piercing the skin. The initiative is far enough along that Apple has been conducting feasibility trials at clinical sites across the Bay Area and has hired consultants to help it figure out the regulatory pathways, the people said. The efforts have been going on for at least five years, the people said. Jobs envisioned wearable devices, like smartwatches, being used to monitor important vitals, such as oxygen levels, heart rate and blood glucose. In 2010, Apple quietly acquired a company called Cor, after then-CEO Bob Messerschmidt reportedly sent Jobs a cold email on the topic of sensor technologies for health and wellness. Messerschmidt later joined the Apple Watch team. The glucose team is said to report to Johny Srouji, Apple's senior vice president of hardware technologies. According to one of the sources, it was previously led by Michael D. Hillman, who left Apple in late 2015 and later joined Facebook's Oculus as head of hardware. Hillman's LinkedIn page lists him as having had a "confidential role" in hardware technologies at Apple. One person said about 30 people were working in this group as of a year ago. But speculation has been flying around since the company snapped Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk With Apples

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk With Apples

A 2013 study led by the Harvard School of Public Health found that eating apples, blueberries and grapes significantly lower one’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers examined data from 187,382 participants in three studies, looking specifically at overall fruit consumption. They found that people who ate at least two servings each week of certain fruits reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by 23 percent in comparison with those who ate less than one serving per month. Though the fruit’s low glycemic index score was not a significant factor in the study, it is important for diabetes patients, or those at risk for developing diabetes. The glycemic index measures how rapidly carbohydrates in a food boost blood sugar, and apples have a low score of 38. Apples also contain soluble fiber, including pectin, which supplies galacturonic acid, which helps control blood sugar by releasing it slowly into the bloodstream. This helps diabetes patients regulate blood sugar and bowel function, while also having an anti-inflammatory effect. Want to know more about apple nutrition and how to include apples in your daily diet? Read our blog post: 31 Nutritious Ways to Enjoy Apples & Pears. Continue reading >>

Apples And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And Other Fruits

Apples And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And Other Fruits

Apples are a nutritious snack, but are the sugars and carbohydrates in an apple good or bad for blood sugar and insulin levels if a person has diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association , although they contain sugars and carbohydrates , eating apples and other fruit is not a problem for a person with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes . Apples contain a different kind of sugar to foods with added sugar, and they also contain fiber and nutrients. A person with diabetes should be aware of how apples affect them in order to include this fruit in a diabetes-healthy diet. In this article, we look at the effects of apples and other fruit on diabetes symptoms. Are apples good for people with diabetes? The fiber in apples may help to slow the absorption of sugars in the body. People with diabetes must watch their carbohydrate intake to make sure their blood sugar levels stay stable throughout the day. It makes sense, then, to monitor any foods that contain carbs and sugars. According to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) , there are about 25 grams (g) of carbs in total in a medium-sized apple, and around 19 g of that is sugar. Most of the sugar in an apple is in the form of naturally occurring fructose, however, and this may have a different effect on the body than other sugars. Also, fructose is different to the refined and processed sugars found in packaged foods such as chocolates and biscuits. A recent review posted to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that replacing glucose or sucrose with fructose led to less sugar and insulin in the blood stream after a meal. The USDA report that a medium apple contains around 4 g of dietary fiber, and this fiber may help slow the absorption of sugars in the body, which could help prevent spikes Continue reading >>

Fruit, Yoghurt And Cheese Among Foods On The Anti-diabetes Diet

Fruit, Yoghurt And Cheese Among Foods On The Anti-diabetes Diet

Fruit, yoghurt and cheese among foods on the anti-diabetes diet The new advice sets out which foods are associated with a higher and lower risk of diabetesCredit:Gustavo Ramirez An apple a day could help prevent diabetes, new health guidelines suggest. Yoghurt, cheese and regular cups of tea or coffee are among other foods and drinks which could help ward off the condition, the advice states. But too much meat and potatoes can raise your likelihood of diagnosis, according to the diet advice from It is the first time health guidelines have specified which foods could help fight off the disease, which is linked to obesity. Previously, people at high risk of developing diabetes were given advice like increase your fibre intake by 15 per cent or to lose 5 per cent of your body weight. But doctors have updated this guidance, saying it does not relate to how people live their lives. The difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Dr Pamela Dyson, research dietician at Oxford University and co-chair of the guidelines, said: Weve made these dietary guidelines in terms of food and not nutrients because food is what people eat, they dont eat nutrients. And its a message thats far easier to communicate with people when youre talking about foods they actually eat. The new advice suggests eating more wholegrains and fruit and vegetables particularly apples, grapes, blueberries and green leafy vegetables. The guidelines also recommend eating dairy products, particularly yoghurt and cheese, and having regular cups of tea or coffee. Cheese also got the thumbs up from doctorsCredit:Getty Diets should be low in red and processed meat, sugary drinks, potatoes especially chips and refined carbohydrates like white bread and white rice. It is also recommended people at high risk of develo Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes

Fruit And Diabetes

Everyone should be eating more fruit and vegetables. You're probably aware of the five a day target, and this is equally important if you’re living with diabetes or if you’re not. You might think you think that the sugar content of fruit means that you can’t eat it. But, the sugar in fruit is natural, and is not this type of sugar we need to cut down on. This is different to the added sugar in drinks, chocolate, cakes and biscuits, as well as in fruit juices and honey. The amount of carbohydrate you eat has the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels and considering a portion of fruit contains about 15–20g carbs, a chocolate muffin has 55g carbs and a small bar of chocolate has 30g carbs it is better to reduce your intake of the chocolate, cakes and other snacks than the fruit itself to help manage your blood glucose levels. It is very unlikely that you need to reduce your fruit intake but you could keep a food diary to check how often and how much fruit you are eating. Some people find that it is easy to overdo the dried fruit, grapes and tropical fruits. If you consider a serving of dried fruit is a tablespoon and packs in 20.8g carbs, 20.8g total sugar and 82 calories you can see how easily this happens. An apple on the other hand, which takes a while to eat, contains only 11.8g carbs, 11.8g sugar and 47 calories. Be mindful of your serving sizes too – bananas in supermarkets now seem to be supersize with a large banana containing 27.8g carbs, 25.1g sugar and 114 calories. But, most people need to cut down on foods with added sugars rather than fruit – a large banana is still better for you than a a standard chocolate bar, which contains 27.9g carbohydrate, 27.8g sugars and a staggering 260 calories. Why do I need to be careful about fruit juices and Continue reading >>

Apples Are Good For People With Diabetes

Apples Are Good For People With Diabetes

By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Apples are undeniably good for youespecially if you have diabetes. Fall's favorite fruit has lots of good-for-you nutrients. Plus, research has linked apples with certain health benefits related to diabetes. A small apple (about the size of a tennis ball) delivers roughly: 60calories, 16 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber. It's also a good source of vitamin C. Additionally, apples contain quercetin, a type of phytochemicalknown as a flavonoid, which is found in the apples skin. Animal researchand research usingcell cultures havefound the quercetin may help to protect against certain cancers and help to kill cancer cells.In a 2015 study inPharmacognosymagazine, researchers found that quercetin improved glucose metabolism in liver and skeletal cells when studied in test tubes. Apples also containsoluble fiberthe kind that helps keep you full, slows down the absorption of nutrients (such as sugar) into your bloodstream, and helps to lower your cholesterol.In addition to helping to regulate blood sugar and bowel function, soluble fiber is thought to have an anti-inflammatory effect that may help people with diabetes recover faster from infections. The recommended daily intake for fiber is 25 (for women) to 38 (for men) grams a day. Learn which foods to enjoy and avoidand start feeling great! A skinned apple is still good for you, but with skin an apple provides 3grams of fiberabout 12 percent of the recommended total dailyintake. There's no denying fruits and vegetables are a healthy and important part of the diet for everyone, including those with diabetes . Registered Dietitian (RD) and Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), Audrey Koltun, says: "Many people with diabetes are afraid to eat fruit because they think Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Do Apples Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Apples Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels?

Apples are delicious, nutritious and convenient to eat. Studies have shown that they have several health benefits. Yet apples also contain carbs, which impact blood sugar levels. However, the carbs found in apples affect your body differently than the sugars found in junk foods. This article explains how apples affect blood sugar levels and how to incorporate them into your diet if you have diabetes. Apples are one of the most popular fruits in the world. They're also highly nutritious. In fact, apples are high in vitamin C, fiber and several antioxidants. One medium apple contains 95 calories, 25 grams of carbs and 14% of the daily value for vitamin C (1). Interestingly, a large part of an apple's nutrients is found in its colorful skin (2). Furthermore, apples contain large amounts of water and fiber, which make them surprisingly filling. You're likely to be satisfied after eating just one (3). Apples are a good source of fiber, vitamin C and antioxidants. They also help you feel full without consuming a lot of calories. If you have diabetes, keeping tabs on your carbohydrate intake is important. That's because of the three macronutrients — carbs, fat and protein — carbs affect your blood sugar levels the most. That being said, not all carbs are created equal. A medium apple contains 25 grams of carbs, but 4.4 of those are fiber (1). Fiber slows down the digestion and absorption of carbs, causing them to not spike your blood sugar levels nearly as quickly (4). Studies show that fiber is protective against type 2 diabetes, and that many types of fiber can improve blood sugar control (5, 6). Apples contain carbs, which can raise blood sugar levels. However, the fiber in apples helps stabilize blood sugar levels, in addition to providing other health benefits. Apples Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type II Diabetes: 6 Fruits to Help Control Your Blood Sugar Controlling your diabetes could be as easy as losing weight. There are many things that you can do to control you blood sugar and increasing your intake of certain fruits is one of them. Natural sugar is easier to break down than processed or man-made sugar. This is why adding fruit, a great source for natural sugar, to your diet in moderation could prevent your body from building an insulin intolerance. Here are our favorite fruits to add to your diet if you are looking to naturally control your blood sugar, or decrease the amount of insulin that you use each day. 1. Avocado Avocado is thought by many to be a vegetable. On the contrary, it is actually a fruit. This fruit is high in monounsaturated fats which are one of the healthy fats that you should ingest on a regular basis. These fruits also improve heart health. They have a very low percentage of low-quality carbohydrates and can improve the sensitivity you have to your insulin. This means that simply snacking on avocado, eating guacamole, or adding it to a sandwich could decrease the amount of insulin that you have to take. 2. Grapefruits Grapefruits are a great source of chromium. Recent studies have shown chromium to significantly lower blood sugar levels. A grapefruit with breakfast can help break down the dietary sugars that are in your cereal as well. It also contains a very low amount of carbohydrates but most of these carbohydrates are considered healthy fiber so they won’t cause a serious increase in blood sugar. 3. Pineapples Pineapple does not prevent blood sugar spikes. However, it has a low glycemic index, which means that it raises your blood sugar slower and does not cause rapid spikes. This means that when your blood sugar starts low, it Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Apples?

Can Diabetics Eat Apples?

Apples and other fruits are widely recognized as part of a nutritious diet. But if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about fruit's impact on your blood glucose levels. Like all fruits, apples are rich in sugar, a form of carbohydrates which the body converts into glucose. Eating too much carbohydrates at once, or too much overall can lead to elevated blood glucose levels. The good news is that the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the inclusion of fruit, including fiber-rich apples, in a diabetes meal plan as long as these foods are fit into your carbohydrate targets. Video of the Day When digested, the carbohydrates from apples are broken down into glucose, a simple form of sugar. As this glucose enters the blood, insulin is needed to help convert this sugar into energy. However, people with diabetes either don’t make enough insulin, or their insulin doesn’t work well, and as a result, dietary carbohydrates have the potential to lead to high blood glucose levels. To best manage blood glucose levels, it’s helpful to eat moderate portions of carbohydrate-containing foods and to spread these foods throughout the day. Alternatively, if you take fast-acting insulin at meals, you can eat according to your appetite and preferences, since you can learn to match your insulin dose to your carbohydrate intake. Meal Planning with Apples A small, tennis ball-sized apple or one-half large apple contains approximately 15 grams of total carbohydrates -- about the same as 1 slice of bread. If you know your carbohydrate targets, you can decide which carbohydrate foods to eat at your meals and snacks. For example, if your lunch carbohydrate target is 45 grams, you can choose to eat one-half apple at 15 grams along with a whole sandwich at 30 grams, or you can cho Continue reading >>

Are Apples Good For Diabetes?

Are Apples Good For Diabetes?

ISLAMABAD: Apples are a nutritious snack, but are the sugars and carbohydrates in an apple good or bad for blood sugar and insulin levels if a person has diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association, although they contain sugars and carbohydrates, eating apples and other fruit is not a problem for a person with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Apples contain a different kind of sugar to foods with added sugar, and they also contain fiber and nutrients. A person with diabetes should be aware of how apples affect them in order to include this fruit in a diabetes-healthy diet. In this article, we look at the effects of apples and other fruit on diabetes symptoms. The fiber in apples may help to slow the absorption of sugars in the body. People with diabetes must watch their carbohydrate intake to make sure their blood sugar levels stay stable throughout the day. It makes sense, then, to monitor any foods that contain carbs and sugars. According to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), there are about 25 grams (g) of carbs in total in a medium-sized apple, and around 19 g of that is sugar. Most of the sugar in an apple is in the form of naturally occurring fructose, however, and this may have a different effect on the body than other sugars. Also, fructose is different to the refined and processed sugars found in packaged foods such as chocolates and biscuits. A recent review posted to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that replacing glucose or sucrose with fructose led to less sugar and insulin in the blood stream after a meal. The USDA report that a medium apple contains around 4 g of dietary fiber, and this fiber may help slow the absorption of sugars in the body, which could help prevent spikes in sugar and insulin. In addition, Continue reading >>

Are Apples Good For Type 2 Diabetics?

Are Apples Good For Type 2 Diabetics?

From juice to cider to all-American apple pie, apples can be found in many delicious (and popular) dishes. Over the years you've probably even heard the saying: “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” While apples are generally a healthy food, when you're a type 2 diabetic, the picture is slightly different. Since we encourage a low carb diet (because science shows it works), we don't recommend apples. Quite simply because, apples are a high carb food. But I'm sure you're eager to dig a bit deeper into the reasoning and discover more of the facts, so let's dive in… Apples Nutrition Facts The calorie and carbohydrate count can vary considerably based on the size and type of apple. But no matter what the size of the fruit is, apples are a very high carbohydrate food that contain a lot of sugar (20-35 grams), and more specifically lots of fructose (around 9.5 grams). Of course, apples are a type of fruit, so naturally they do have some very beneficial properties such as high fiber content (3-5 grams), along with various vitamins and minerals. For instance, a medium gala apple contains: 6% Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) potassium 8% RDA vitamin C 4% RDA vitamin A 5% RDA riboflavin 6% RDA vitamin B6 While apples may provide some nutritional value to the general public. For you as a diabetic, making the switch to something else is better. And hey, vegetables offer far more vitamins and minerals than an apple. For example, if you were to switch out that apple for a cup of kale, you’d get 200% of your RDA of vitamin C and 434% of your daily vitamin A – and all that for just 13 calories and 1 gram of carbohydrates. Try these delicious Crispy Kale Chips – they will more than satisfy your snack attack! Sounds like a much better option to maintain blood glucose and A Continue reading >>

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