diabetestalk.net

Diabetic Alternatives For Thanksgiving

See How Easily You Can Have A Diabetes Friendly Thanksgiving

See How Easily You Can Have A Diabetes Friendly Thanksgiving

See How Easily You Can Have a Diabetes Friendly Thanksgiving Join the fight against diabetes on Facebook Thanksgiving is one of the more challenging holidays for those of us with diabetes. The reason? The entire holiday revolves around food. Lets face it, you gather with family and friends on this day to celebrate and have a Thanksgiving feast. As we have come to accept, there is no taking a vacation from Diabetes. Its not like you are on a special diet to lose some pounds and can choose to make Thanksgiving your cheating dayit doesnt work like that. As a diabetic on Thanksgiving you are left with a couple of choices: You can either stay home and not celebrate with your family and loves ones Or you can make sure that you have a game plan for healthy diabetic eating before you sit down for your meal. If you choose the first option, be prepared to never hear the end of the time you decided not to go to Thanksgiving dinner. If you choose the second option keep reading . The ideal scenario would be if you, the diabetic, were having people over to your home for the Thanksgiving day meal. You would be able to ensure a large selection of diabetes friendly choices to feast on along with having the traditional Thanksgiving day favorites. But lets face it, we dont live in a perfect world. If you are like me, you are probably NOT going to be doing any of the cooking for your Thanksgiving meal. Youre probably going to: Watch The Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade on TV Work your way over to the home of the responsible adult in your family that is able to hold a Thanksgiving Dinner If that sounds more like it, then you are going to have to get a diabetes game plan in place prior to sitting down to your Thanksgiving day meal. Keep in mind that you were invited to wherever you are going o Continue reading >>

A Thanksgiving Day Meal Plan

A Thanksgiving Day Meal Plan

Curious if you can enjoy your favorite holiday foods without sabotaging your health efforts? It takes a little planning, but it can be done! 3/4 cup cooked oatmeal (cooked with water) with the following mixed in: 2 tablespoons dry roasted almonds (unsalted) 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar blend (half brown sugar, half sugar substitute) cup roasted sweet potatoes (simply dice up sweet potatoes, toss in 1 teaspoon olive oil and season with paprika and ground black pepper) 1/2 cup canned reduced-sodium garbanzo beans (drained and rinsed) 2 celery stalks (cut into snack-size pieces) 1/2 cup cooked green beans seasoned with: 1 4-ounce pear, sliced into snack-size pieces Tips for adjusting the calories and carbohydrates in this month's meal plan. Photo: Creamy Cheesy Cauliflower from The Family Classics Cookbook. Taran Z Photography Tips to help you enjoy your favorite Thanksgiving foods without sabotaging your health efforts. Find examples of how to fit a serving of your favorite dessert in this Thanksgiving. This book features over 140 tasty recipes plus other tips and techniques from our Diabetes Forecast Magazine. For the new or aspiring chef, there is a section called Cooking 101, featuring tips and tricks for developing your kitchen skills. Find tips to adjust the carbohydrates and calories in this month's meal plan to better fit your needs. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at Continue reading >>

How To Have A Diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving Day For The Whole Family

How To Have A Diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving Day For The Whole Family

How to Have a Diabetes-Friendly Thanksgiving Day for the Whole Family For most Americans, November is the time for turkey, football, and pumpkin spice everything. But its also National Diabetes Month , a time to spread awareness about the disease, which, in 2015, affected over 30 million people in the U.S. While there are a few different kinds of diabetes , all involve a problem with the bodys ability to produce or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps the bodys cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. When theres not enoughor anyinsulin available, glucose stays in the blood and can cause serious health problems. No matter the form diabetes takes, experts agree that food and lifestyle factors are essential for helping to maintain overall health. Its important to find a lifestyle that can help improve the lipid [cholesterol] profile, blood pressure, and blood sugar, says Malcolm Thaler, MD, a New York-based physician . All of these goals can help be managed by a lifestyle that incorporates weight loss, healthy nutrition, and exercise. If youre thinking, Wait a minute! Those sound like great goals for almost anyone, then youre right. Theres no such thing as a diabetic diet, says Tracy Morris, an accredited dietetic professional and nutrition curriculum designer at Fitbit. But luckily, a diabetes-friendly meal is one thats good for everyone! And a diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving is possible, even if the thought of subjecting traditional relatives to nutritious dishes and light exercise seems daunting. Here are four simple ways to make this Thanksgiving happier and healthier for the whole family: One of the most important steps is to avoid the traditional plate overflowing with processed white carbs like stuffing, cornbread, dinner rolls, a Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Enjoy Your Diabetic Thanksgiving (plus 20+ Recipes)

10 Tips To Enjoy Your Diabetic Thanksgiving (plus 20+ Recipes)

to choose one meat, one starch and a few sides of vegetables and not have an a smorgasbord of options. Another great strategy is to let each person pick one favorite dish and prepare it. That way, everyone feels acknowledged and can feel there is something special they took ownership in. 10 Tips to Enjoy Your Diabetic Thanksgiving and Continue to Take Care of YOU Here are some key tips to enjoy your diabetic Thanksgiving without sabotaging your healthy efforts: balanced breakfast with some protein and fiber. If you show up to the meal starved, your willpower will be low and you will find it very easy to excuse overeating. plain Greek yogurt with berries, nuts/seeds. KEY TIP: Don't skip breakfast on Thanksgiving Avoid congregating around gobs of food as this will only make the temptation to eat mindlessly or nervously greater. Conversation will trend around food and you will be more likely to keep picking at foods as you see others doing this. Or you may use food as a filler during awkward silences. KEY TIP: Try to move conversations away from the food area Okay, so you might splurge a bit, but make your splurges count. Seriously. Dont waste 40 grams of carbs on a dumb store-bought roll or pre-packaged pie. Find that homemade dessert or favorite potato dish and savor a few bits of it. KEY TIP: Choose wisely and make every bit count Dont feel guilty. Enjoy your meal and make it last. (the feeling of fullness) a meal provides is psychological and emotional. If you dont take the time to on what youre eating, be thankful for the food, and savor it, you are likely to overeat and still want more. KEY TIP: Focus on enjoying each and every bite by being present in the moment The holidays are not (or shouldn't be) about food. The word origin comes from Holy days. These are days Continue reading >>

Low Carb Plant Based Vegetarian Diabetic Thanksgiving

Low Carb Plant Based Vegetarian Diabetic Thanksgiving

This post maycontain affiliate links , which help support this blog but dont add to your cost. Its amazing how many people cannot fathom the idea that Thanksgiving neednt feature a turkey and lots of high carb sides. But when youre both a vegetarian and have diabetes (like me), or youre on a Low Carb Plant Based (LCPB) diet for any reason, you need alternatives. I scoured the web for a menu I could put together containing JUST low carb vegetarian options. Most recipe roundups feature EITHER low carb recipes (many of which contain meat) OR vegetarian recipes (many of which contain a lot of carbs). Mine is different in that all of these qualify as both low carb AND vegetarian. I was also focusing on selecting as many recipes that hearken back to traditional dishes as I could. So youll find things like a low carb version of candied yams. And theres a low carb pecan pie. I listed several options for a vegetarian main dish, so you can take your pick. Finally, I was determined to showcase a variety of sites and blogs, so I tried to make each recipe come from a different one. There are a couple of sites that show up more than once, because they had so many recipes that sounded amazing. Definitely add all of these sites to your list of places to check ongoingly for more low carb vegetarian recipes. These recipes could form YOUR Thanksgiving menu if youre the one hosting this year (selecting from one of the many entree ideas Ive provided below), or you can pick and choose, to round out your traditional menu. If youre attending someone elses Thanksgiving, choose one or more of these as your contribution to their table. And if you are hosting someone else with low carb vegetarian needs, you could surprise them by providing one or more of these recipes. Theyll be delighted! Note t Continue reading >>

8 Ideas For Hosting A Diabetic-friendly Thanksgiving Dinner

8 Ideas For Hosting A Diabetic-friendly Thanksgiving Dinner

When someone is living with a chronic health condition , they can get self-conscious about how people perceive their self-management, says Sally Ho, a certified diabetes educator and registered dietitianat Motivate Nutrition in Edmonton. While some people feel comfortable testing their blood sugar in a group or giving themselves insulin at the table, others dont. Direct them to a private space where they can take care of those needs. When it comes to appetizers, it might be time to give your beloved pumpernickel bread and spinach dip a rest. Since the main course at Thanksgiving tends to be carb-heavy, veggies and dip, reduced-sodium pickles and cheese are more balanced pre-dinner alternatives . Want to serve a hot starter? Consider this Chestnut and Porcini Mushroom Soup . People with diabetes dont need to cut out carbs entirely. Rather, they should enjoy them in moderate amounts, says Andrea Toogood, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Essence Nutrition and Wellness Coaching in Regina. Providing aselection of alternative choices, such as steamed green beans , roasted carrots or a green salad , can help lighten the load. Toogood says pured cauliflower is a great alternative to mashed potatoes . While raw potatoes pack 17 grams of carbohydrates for every 100 grams, raw cauliflower comes in at just three gramsand two grams of that is fibre, which the body doesnt break down and convert into glucose. Remember to let everyone know the main ingredients in each dish so those who have various dietary restrictions can enjoy accordingly. Remember to keep a variety of low-sugar beverages on hand, including water, sparkling water and diet pop, says Ho. People who have diabetes know they should be mindful of alcoholic drinks, she says, explaining that beer, w Continue reading >>

30 Best Low Carb Thanksgiving Recipes | All Day I Dream About Food

30 Best Low Carb Thanksgiving Recipes | All Day I Dream About Food

Ive collected 30 of the best low carb, gluten-free Thanksgiving recipes to help you stay healthy this holiday season. I know that the holidays can be intimidating on a low carb diet, especially if you are new to it. You are surrounded by tempting high carb foods and its so easy to give in, especially when friends and family are encouraging you to eat, eat, mangia, mangia. And its a holiday, a special day, so you think to yourself: Why not? Its a special day, I deserve just a little bit. But one bite leads to another and next thing you know, youve eaten 3 pies and a whole plate of stuffing and mashed potatoes smothered in flour-y gravy. Then you spend the next few days beating yourself up and wondering if you can get back on track after such a binge. But this slightly-exaggerated scenario doesnt have to be a reality. The truth is that there are many wonderful low carb options for Thanksgiving and other holidays that can keep you from giving into temptation without feeling deprived. You can eat to your hearts content and even indulge in a few of your favourites, all while sticking to your low carb, gluten-free diet. It is possible, trust me. Because I have spent the past few years perfecting the art of the low carb holiday dinner. Many other great bloggers have as well. So I have collected the best low carb Thanksgiving recipes here for you to plan your holiday menu. Filed Under: Bread , Gluten Free , Low Carb , Main Dishes , Other Desserts , Pies & Tarts , Side Dishes Please note that I am not a medical or nutritional professional. I am simply recounting and sharing my own experiences on this blog. Nothing I express here should be taken as medical advice and you should consult with your doctor before starting any diet or exercise program. I provide nutritional informati Continue reading >>

How To Cook For A Diabetic At Thanksgiving

How To Cook For A Diabetic At Thanksgiving

How to Cook for a Diabetic at Thanksgiving How to Cook for a Diabetic at Thanksgiving For someone monitoring his or her blood sugar, indulging in a traditional Thanksgiving feast can be distressing. From the carb-laden appetizers to the sweet potato casserole and pumpkin pie, its easy to throw caution to the wind when low-sugar options are sparse. Though fear not, for we are here to provide you with an easy guide to help make your Thanksgiving every bit as tasty while also being diabetic-friendly. After all, everyone should be able to enjoy the holiday with as little stress as possible. Diabetic-Friendly ThanksgivingAppetizers A diabetic should be snacking on a little something every few hours to keep blood sugar levelsin check. It would not be wise to attempt to fast the whole day leading up to the big meal. This could result in your blood sugar dropping too low and leave you feeling lethargic and dizzy. Instead, aim to incorporate snacks with protein, whole grains, and heart-healthy fats every few hours. Easy munchies: Raw vegetables with hummus, protein-packed cheese board , roasted nuts, shrimp cocktail Caramelized Onion, Gruyere, and Bacon Spread Diabetic-Friendly ThanksgivingMain Meals Believe it or not, this is where things get easy. A ton of easy substitutions can makelightening the carbohydrate and sugar content of Thanksgiving staples a breeze. In fact, well walk you through every inch of the traditional spread to make it fail-proof. The Bird: Turkey is an excellent source of lean protein, which you want plenty of on this holiday. Consuming protein in combination with carbohydrates and sugar will help prevent spikes in blood sugar and keep you feeling satiated. We recommend keeping the seasoning simple and avoiding any maple or brown sugar glazes. Green Bean Continue reading >>

Thanksgiving Dinner: Five Diabetes-friendly Dishes

Thanksgiving Dinner: Five Diabetes-friendly Dishes

Thanksgiving Dinner: Five Diabetes-Friendly Dishes The whole family is heading to your house for Thanksgiving next week. In addition to setting the perfect table and cooking that turkey to bronzed, juicy perfection, youve got a new challenge on your plate this year: feeding a loved one with diabetes. Everyone knows Thanksgiving dinner isnt exactly the healthiest meal of the yearso what can you do to make sure your loved one eats right, and everyone else enjoys the meal, too? As you begin to plan your menu for next Thursday, think about including some of these diabetic Thanksgiving recipes to ensure everyone can enjoy the meal together. In honor of National Diabetes Month, here are five diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving dishes that are healthy and delicious: A delicious, traditional first course, most butternut squash soup is loaded with cream and butter. This version gets a punch from curry powder, and the creamy texture everyone loves from yogurt. Thanksgiving dinner wouldnt be complete without gravy to pour over that roasted bird, and welleverything else on your plate. But most gravy recipes are extremely high in fat and calories. For a diabetes-friendly version, try this gravy, which gets its flavor from apple cider. Everybody loves creamy, fluffy mashed potatoes. For a healthier substitute, try this recipe, which switches carb-laden potatoes with cauliflower, and packs in flavor with tangy buttermilk and garlic. For an even healthier version, substitute buttermilk with nonfat Greek yogurt. To many people, stuffing is the best part of the holiday meal. But Grandmas classic recipe is full of fat and carbs. Revamp classic stuffing with this recipe for sausage stuffing, which keeps that rich, delicious stuffing taste, but switches pork sausage for healthier turkey sausage Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Holiday Dishes

Diabetes-friendly Holiday Dishes

Take Control of Thanksgiving Dinner The current approach to dietary management of diabetes is to tailor the meal plan for each individual. But in general, a healthy diabetic diet involves controlling total carbohydrates (particularly refined carbohydrates), reducing calories and sodium, increasing fiber, and replacing saturated fats and trans fats with more heart–healthy mono– and polyunsaturated fats. This approach, of course, is healthy for anyone who wants to eat better. Try these healthier recipes when you're in charge of Thanksgiving cooking. First up: Sunflower seeds and brown rice pack a double nutrition punch, enhancing our Multigrain Pilaf with Sunflower Seeds side dish with vitamin E and niacin. View Recipe: Multigrain Pilaf with Sunflower Seeds Tuscan Turkey Forget dry, tasteless turkey. A rub of roasted garlic and fresh sage permeates every ounce of the bird, while a Dijon and white wine baste locks in moisture for juicy, tender meat. Save the giblets for our Classic Turkey Gravy. If your turkey starts to overbrown after the first hour in the oven, cover loosely with foil, and continue roasting. Remember to let the turkey rest so juices can redistribute and the bird can cool enough to carve. View Recipe: Tuscan Turkey Chorizo and Roasted Poblano Wild Rice Stuffing Hot cooked wild rice is incredibly nutty and fragrant, a perfect counter to smoky paprika, quick roasted poblano peppers, and spicy fresh chorizo. Look for ground, raw Mexican chorizo rather than Spanish chorizo (cured, cased sausage). The rice will absorb the drippings from the sausage as the two bake together in the casserole dish. If you can’t find Mexican chorizo, try hot Italian pork or turkey sausage. We treat the rice the same as a bread stuffing—binding it with a mixture of stock, e Continue reading >>

A Diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving Feast

A Diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving Feast

No need to fret over the holiday spreadjust follow our menu of diabetes diet-friendly alternatives to nearly every Turkey-Day favorite. Start off with this aromatic and vitamin-rich soup to keep hunger and portions in check. 2 cans (14 oz each) fat-free reduced-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth 1/2 c low-fat plain yogurt, at room temperature 1. PLACE the squash, cut side down, on a microwaveable tray. Microwave on high power, rotating once, for 8 to 10 minutes, or until tender. Remove and let stand for 5 minutes. Scoop out the flesh and place in a large bowl. 2. MEANWHILE, warm the oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion, celery, and garlic. Cook, stirring often, for 10 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft. Add the curry powder and ginger. Cook for 3 minutes. Add the wine or apple juice. Bring to a boil. Add the broth, the reserved squash, and salt. Reduce the heat to medium. Cook for 10 minutes. 3. TRANSFERthe soup to a blender or food processor inbatches. Puree until smooth. Return to the pot. Stir in the yogurt. NUTRITION (per serving) 74 calories, 2 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 2 g protein, 12 g carbohydrates, 4 g sugar, 2 g fiber, 317 mg sodium Packed with peppers and cheese, these muffins are a guilt-free replacement for starchy, refined-flour rolls. The flavor screams gourmet, and theyre ready in 30 minutes. 2. IN a small bowl, mix together the thyme, tarragon, rosemary, garlic powder, onion powder, pepper, and 3/4 teaspoon of the salt. Rub the oil or butter over the turkey and sprinkle with the herb mixture, pressing it in lightly. Place in a roasting pan and in the oven, immediately reducing the heat to 350F. 3. ROAST, basting occasionally with the fat in the pan, until a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 170F, about Continue reading >>

Healthy Holiday Meal Alternatives For People With Diabetes

Healthy Holiday Meal Alternatives For People With Diabetes

Thanksgiving is a huge food holiday! So it can be a tricky holiday for people who have diseases which are affected by food like diabetes or prediabetes. And it's tricky for those who are obese and overweight. The thought of managing all the food options if you have diabetes, or are dealing with weight issues, can cause anxiety. It can be stressful when you are trying to figure out how to create a tasty meal that will not throw your numbers out of whack. I have some ideas for you to consider to help you manage Thanksgiving day and the holiday weekend with ease. One of the most important considerations for diabetes or people with weight issues is to keep your blood sugars balanced during the day. This means you need to eat regular meals. You need to eat breakfast and lunch before your big dinner meal. Make sure that your breakfast and lunch are healthy whole foods. You can enjoy Thanksgiving dinner by eating small portions of the food available for the dinner. Don't take home leftovers. Start back on your normal plan the day after Thanksgiving. The best way for diabetics to balance blood sugars is to eat vegetables and proteins. I have a great surprise for you. You can eat great food for every course. Perhaps you know that you will be serving family members that are diabetics or overweight and you want to make foods that they can eat and others will love too. Here are some suggestions to make your Thanksgiving meal diabetic friendly: While you are waiting for dinner think about dips. Try beans dips or vegetable dips, spinach or artichoke or crab dips, adding small amounts of low-fat cheese or sour cream. Serve them with multi-grain crackers or vegetables. Dont eat any too many. For your first course, you can have salads or soups that have plenty of vegetable or lean meat Continue reading >>

Remaking Thanksgiving Menus

Remaking Thanksgiving Menus

Despite its historical trappings, Thanksgiving, for most of us, is a holiday about food and family (and, often, the watching of televised sports). While it's also a day for home cooks to show their stuff, the expectations of the people doing the eating are what shapes the menu, which may be why that menu doesn't change much year after year. So how do you keep your family's tradition going when you're also trying to stay healthy? We've tinkered with some of the stalwarts of the Thanksgiving table, stripping out fat and carbs while keeping the customary flavors very much intact. Think of it as a much-needed makeover. Rustic Mashed Potatoes With Olive Oil and Garlic You'll notice that these potatoes use no heavy creamand, in fact, no dairy at all. Instead, their smoothness is the result of olive oil and some of the potatoes' cooking liquid. Another update: Parmesan cheese. Since Parmesan is quite intense, only a little bit is needed to produce a lot of flavor, compared with a milder cheese. Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Pineapple and Spices First up: We cut way down on the butter, which you probably won't even miss. That means a lot less unhealthy fat. And instead of the usual brown sugar, crushed pineapple adds plenty of sweetness, meaning we could skip the goopy melted marshmallows, too. The star here is the whole wheat bread, far heartier than the usual white, and full of good fiber. Instead of being loaded with butter, this stuffing is held together by the addition of very hot broth, which the bread cubes soak up. Meanwhile, dried cranberries or cherries add color and zing. Holiday Pumpkin Pie With Maple Ginger Crust The secret is in the crust! Using graham-cracker crumbs instead of a traditional wheat flour means you need only add a teaspoon of canola oil rather than th Continue reading >>

Diabetic Thanksgiving Recipes

Diabetic Thanksgiving Recipes

The holidays can be toughwhen you have dietary restrictions, but it's possible to enjoy the biggest feast of the year with smart swaps and simple substitutions.This year,serve up dishes that everyone in the family can enjoy with diabetic Thanksgiving recipes that are low in carbs, added sugar, sodium, and fat. You'll love our collection of lightened-up favorites, including inspiring appetizers, entres, and sides. Plan ahead to get outside and get some exercise before or after the meal as well. A brisk walk around the block will go a long way toward helpingkeep calories in check and building togetherness on this day of thanks. Instead of a wet brine, this bird uses an overnight dry salt and sugar cure, which concentrates flavor. If you want to leave the skin on, it will add 25 calories and 1g of sat fat per serving. Hard herbs (fresh sage, rosemary, and thyme) hold up beautifully while roasting, imparting a woodsy, savory note to the meat. Soft herbs (parsley and chives) garnish the turkey and perk up the finished gravy. The wine in the roasting pan will keep the bird moist as it roasts and flavor the pan drippings used for the gravy. Spiralized Cinnamon Apples with Greek Yogurt Were kind of obsessed with spiralizing, so naturally we had to give it a try with apples. The result? A perfectly twirlable treat. Top with Greek yogurt and homemade granola, and you have a sweet little snack, size, or dessert for less than 150 calories per serving. With just 10.5g of carbs and 33mg sodium, youcan indulge in this seasonal treat sans guilt. For more low-carb options, see 10 Smart Diabetic Swaps for the Holidays. Enjoy this spread as an appetizer or dessert. Nuts and cheese pack in the protein while the fruit and chocolate add just the right amount of sweetness to satisfy your cra Continue reading >>

How Can I Manage My Diabetes During Thanksgiving?

How Can I Manage My Diabetes During Thanksgiving?

How can I manage my diabetes during Thanksgiving? Vandana R. Sheth on behalf of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Thanksgiving can be an enjoyable celebration for everyone. If you have diabetes it is important that you remember to count carbs, monitor your blood sugar, enjoy all foods in moderation, take your medicines (if prescribed) on time and stay physically fit. Also, remember that alcohol does affect your blood sugar and adjust your food intake accordingly. Just because you are busy all day preparing for the big holiday meal does not mean that you skip other meals. Enjoy a good breakfast and eat throughout the day to keep your energy level up and avoid overeating Pace yourself through the holiday gatherings and focus on quality time spent with family/friends rather than on the food alone Use the "Choose My Plate" icon as a visual cue as to types of foods and portions everyday including the holidays. For instance, fill half your plate with colorful fall fruits and vegetables, 1/4 of your plate turkey/lean protein and 1/4 of your plate with carbohydrates (bread, potato, etc.) Be creative and tweak traditional recipes to make them healthier Plan an activity that is physically active such as a family walk after the holiday meal Remember that all foods can fit into a healthy diet. The key is enjoy a variety, balance and practice portion control Univ. of Nev. School of Medicine, Family Medicine You can manage your diabetes during Thanksgiving by planning ahead and managing portion sizes. Plan ahead by buying (or bringing) sugar-free deserts. Use small portion size to control your carbohydrate intake. Dedicate one third or less of your plate for carbs, with the other two-thirds for turkey and vegetables. Also try to limit your alcohol intake. Thanksgiving can be a time Continue reading >>

More in diabetes