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Diabetic Alert Dog Scholarships

The Dogs

The Dogs

**(due to limited volunteer staff, telephone calls are difficult to reply) Placement of dogs is based strictly on the availability of trained dogs and the need and compatibility of applicants, not on a first come, first served basis. Scholarships may be available, based on individual need and availability of funds. At this time, there are no scholarship funds available. THE DOGS Through generous donations from breeders, we have had some amazing dogs to work with. Each puppy is raised in loving homes with a volunteer raiser who is dedicated to helping foster growth, training and development of the puppy. The volunteer raisers attend weekly meeting where the work with D.A.D.s Director of Training, Kristin Tarnowski. At these meetings, the raisers learn new techniques for training and go on outings to stores and restaurants in preparation for the dogs work as a service animal. Dogs Assisting Diabetics provides the volunteer with all the necessary food, training equipment and veterinary care for the puppy. It is through donations that this program is able to thrive. Dogs Assisting Diabetics Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Melvin is a beautiful AKC Yellow Labrador Retriever donated by Howards Royal Labradors. Melvin is smart and loves to do scent training. Melvin was career changed and now works as a search and rescue dog! Hoodoo and his three other litter mates were donated by Jill, a loving lady who is passionate about the cause to help people with diabetes. Named after the Hoodoo Ski Resort, Hoodoo is an AKC Golden Retriever who is very cuddly and energetic about his scent training. Hoodoo was placed and is a working service dog for a young girl! Roger, named after a lawyer, supporter of the program and work or diabetes, is one of the Golden Retriever litter mates. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dogs: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes Alert Dogs: Everything You Need To Know

Note: This article has been reviewed by Dr. Dana Hardin MD, and Dr. Jennifer Cattet Ph.D. Many individuals with type 1 diabetes spend their days worrying about the possibility of having a low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia). Aside from frequent testing of blood glucose levels (self monitoring of blood glucose, SMBG), they may experience uncomfortable signs of hypoglycemia such as sweating, shaking, or confusion. These early symptoms of hypoglycemia are helpful, even though uncomfortable, because they help the person with diabetes know it is time to check their glucose level. Once the person checks and learns they are hypoglycemic, they are taught what food or drink to take to raise their blood sugar. If the low blood sugar is not treated in time, persistent hypoglycemia can lead to seizures, blackouts, or even coma. Unfortunately, over time (generally after 5 or so years) a person with 1 diabetes no longer feels symptoms when his/her blood glucose is low. This condition is known as Hypoglycemia Unawareness. When hypoglycemia unawareness develops, the person is at much greater risk for the development of persistent hyperglycemia and all of the dangerous problems listed above. Patients have reported feeling ok and not knowing they had low blood sugar until they wake up on the floor, or they have had a seizure. Some don’t realize what happened until they are taken to the hospital. If you are one of these individuals, you probably worry about your next hypoglycemia episode on a daily basis. You would likely feel much better if you were aware of something or someone which could help you monitor and alert your oncoming low blood sugar drop. Well, good news! A diabetes alert dog (DAD) can help you become aware of hypoglycemia even if you don’t feel any different. To give Continue reading >>

Service Dogs

Service Dogs

Service Dog Training Options Companion Training offers Service Dog training in Boise, Idaho. We also help people with their Service Dog needs from all across the country. Get started today by scheduling a consultation with one of our professionals. We look forward to answering any questions you may have. SERVICE DOG OPTIONS: Assistance Dog: Service dogs help by reducing reliance on other people to perform tasks that you may have difficulty performing yourself. These dogs are trained to perform physical tasks such as pulling a wheelchair, retrieving dropped objects, opening doors and drawers and flipping switches for lights or automatic doors. Unconditional love 24 hours a day, greater independence, increased confidence and social interaction. Beyond performing tasks that their handlers cannot do themselves, assistance dogs open up a world of joy that is best described as a ”pure blessing“. Service dogs assist people who have health challenges such as mobility impairments, chronic fatigue issues, balance problems and many other health challenges. Please notice we do not use the word ”disabled“. We train assistance dogs to help people improve their ”abilities“ not focus on disabilities. In fact our motto is ”Choose ability, not disability“! Diabetic Alert Dogs: Diabetic Alert Dogs provide an increased level of independence & security through early detection of swings in blood sugar levels. Early detection allows for tighter blood sugar control, which in return dramatically improves a persons health & well being.This advanced warning detection can help Diabetics prevent the suffering consequences of prolonged highs or life threatening lows. The advanced training your Diabetic Alert Dog receives through Companion Training® is tailored specifically to your u Continue reading >>

Donate

Donate

We are always grateful for any help the public can offer. Newspapers, towels, baby blankets, Odo-ban kennel disinfectant /deodorizer, paper towels, You may want to donate dollars and this is what your dollars can do! $5.00 an identification plate for training collar $15.00 buys training leash and collar, several pound of raw bones $25.00, micro-chip, a seat belt for a service dog $35.00 a Service Dog vest, a bag of dog food $40.00 A neuter, rental of our monthly training space in Arkansas for 1 day, Parasite and flea control for one dog for a month $50.00 a monthly groom on one of our long haired dogs, a case of frozen Bil-jac, $60.00 A spay, a Kuranda bed, to keep them up off the ground when they are outside $100.00 buys a crate. We use a lot of crates!!! Printing of our brochures, cards, postcards, one day of dog sitting if I need to be gone $200.00 a new set of grooming clippers and blades $300.00 a new kennel run we need about 4 more to build some bigger play yards for the dogs. $500.00 rental on our training building for 1 month $1,500 a new bathtub to bathe dogs in to eliminate grooming bills. A scholarship for a PTSD dog for a Veteran or an Autism dog. A scholarship for a Seizure Alert dog or a Diabetic Alert dog. A scholarship for a Wheelchair assist dog. And our biggest wish ever: $50,000 for a down payment on a bigger, safer rural facility to keep expanding our ability to train more dogs. Or if someone out there has rural property 10 acres or more that you would like to donate to build a facility on? Or maybe it already has a house on it too? We are a 501 (c) 3 Charity and all of your donations no matter how big or small help in more ways than I can put to paper , or in words. I am always so grateful when people believe in us by supporting us again THANK YOU Continue reading >>

Pre Trained Diabetic Alert Dogs Available | Service Dog Academy

Pre Trained Diabetic Alert Dogs Available | Service Dog Academy

Already Trained Dogs Mary McNeight, CPDT-KA, CCS, BGS 2018-01-16T21:06:55+00:00 After the success of a trial diabetic alert dog puppy board and train session during Christmas of 2011 the Service Dog Academy has launched our already trained diabetic alert training program. If you would rather receive a pre trained diabetic alert dog instead of spending the next year going through our train your own diabetic alert dog classes , please fill out the information below and we will get you on our list to be contacted when the program starts. Dogs should be available as soon as March of 2018 and will be for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics over the age of 8. The puppies have been trained from 8 weeks of age in the hands of head trainer Mary McNeight. From 8 weeks of age these dogs will be taken out in public every day, be obedience trained and worked with diabetic alert scent EVERY SINGLE DAY. Dogs will be delivered from anywhere between 8 month to 2 years of age depending on the maturity level of the dog so that they can go through their first fear period in the hands of certified trainer to ensure they are enjoying their jobs and are suitable for service work in public. We are not using the typical puppy raiser training philosophy due to the fact that our success rate is exponentially higher if a service dog candidate lives and trains 24 hours a day 7 days a week with a certified service dog trainer from puppyhood. Since this is such an intense training process, we will only be able to provide anywhere between 4 and 6 dogs per year. Please be aware that purchasing a dog does not mean you will never have to train your dog ever again. You will have to continue training for the rest of your life in order to maintain the dog at the level at which we provide them to you at. These dogs Continue reading >>

*note: We Are No Longer Taking New Service Dog Clients. We Are Not Accepting New Applications. Here’s Why. *

*note: We Are No Longer Taking New Service Dog Clients. We Are Not Accepting New Applications. Here’s Why. *

Diabetes Alert Dogs Brooks Labradors Service Dogs™ Diabetic Alert Dogs (more properly referred to as “Diabetes Alert Dogs”) are trained to recognize the “out of range” blood sugar levels experienced by a person with Type 1 Diabetes, and to alert him well before a life threatening seizure or blackout. Diabetes Alert Dogs (DADs) are a relatively new addition to the Service Dog industry and truly amazing companions. We breed and train service dogs to increase the quality of life for children and adults living with Type 1 diabetes, particularly those who experience “hypoglycemic unawareness.” Normally, a person with diabetes can feel their blood sugar dropping or spiking. They may become light headed, drowsy or experience headaches. Diabetics that suffer from hypoglycemia unawareness do not readily feel the effects of a change to their blood sugar and are therefore at a high risk for life threatening seizures and complications, especially while they sleep. Diabetes Alert Dogs can smell a diabetic’s blood sugar dropping or spiking out of range, and alert their diabetic owner/handler in advance of a crisis. DADs are trained to “alert” their owner to the onset of a change in their body’s chemistry and to keep alerting them until the condition is corrected or until they receive the help they need. Diabetes Alert Dogs can help you and your family to enjoy a higher quality of life and safety. Through intense and specialized training, your DAD will be able to “alert” you to check your blood sugar and take corrective action. Owning a Diabetes Alert Dog can help you or someone you love in many ways: Sleep Through The Night – Your DAD can help you and your family to sleep safely through the night, knowing that your dog is trained to alert you in time to pr Continue reading >>

Service Dogs For America | How To Apply & Faqs

Service Dogs For America | How To Apply & Faqs

Serving individuals with disabilities since 1989. Service Dogs for America was officially designated as a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization in December, 1992. It is our mission to train and certify service dogs for individuals with disabilities. Applicants from anywhere in the United States will be considered,regardless of race, religion, gender,or sexual orientation. Service Dogs for America (SDA) has recently established new guidelines and revised its criteria for assessments and placements, all of which is detailed inour Preliminary Application Packet . Please review this information thoroughly, as well as theFrequently Asked Questions(FAQs) further down on this page, prior to filling out and submitting a preliminary application. Once you have reviewed all the information you may submit your preliminary application to us via fax, mail or e-mail: If you are unable to download and/or print the application, please contact our office and we can mail the application to you. We also encourage any person considering a service dog to please read What Every Caregiver Needs To Know About Service Dogs SDA accepts preliminary applications year round anda Review Committee screens them on a monthly basis. If the preliminary application meets SDAs placement criteria, a letter will be sent out with an invitation to submit a full application. Please note: submitting afull application does not mean the applicant is automatically approved for a service dog. When all parts of the full application have been received, the applicationis reviewed byan independent Medical Review Board (MRB) who meets approximately every 6-8 weeks. The MRB makes the final determination on whether applicants are approved or denied. Applicants are notified by mail within thirty (30) days of the decision. What Continue reading >>

Grand Junction - Kiwanis International

Grand Junction - Kiwanis International

Check out the Kiwanis International Magazines Childs Best Friend article Scroll down to find out about the program andread Halle's speech below (when our Club formally gaveSandy to her). He's 8 weeks old & his handler is Gwen Kingery There is a growing prevalence of silent disabilities such as diabetes and extreme allergies among our communitys children. Many of these childrens lives are severely constrained and socially limited by their need to be continuously monitored and protected. Childrenslives can be dramatically improved with a well trained alert service dog. These dogs alert to a diabetic episode or the presence of a dangerous allergen. They can locate and retrieve medications, even when misplaced. We strive to change the lives of children in our community who are afflicted with these silent disabilities by providing them with dogs bred with specific characteristics suitable for service work. Our club invites selected families, with an afflicted child, to apply for enrollment in our Academy where they receive a puppy at NO COST to the family. Sandi means the world to me. He is my little alerter that helps me realize that Im low, my little guardian angel, my angel in disguise. He helps me with my diabetes and epilepsy, even farther on maybe with my sight. He even wakes us up in the middle of the night to tell us that I am high or low and grabs my tester off the counter. Sandi is my little angel. Thank you all for letting me have a chance to have him as my service dog. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Dog

Diabetic Alert Dog

There are many tools to use in dealing with diabetes, and the Diabetic Alert Dog is one more tool to add to the toolbox used to help families deal with their child who has diabetes. With the use of a Diabetic Alert Dog the child can gain the independence they need as they grow up and mature and the parents are not afraid to allow them to do so. Here at 4 Paws we place Diabetic Alert Dogs with children who have insulin-dependent Type 1 Diabetes. As with all medical alert dogs, Diabetic Alert Dogs are trained to smell the chemical body changes that occur as the insulin levels increase or drop. When a child is experiencing a high or low, their body is releasing chemicals that change their typical scent. A 4 Paws Dog with the right training in scent-based work is able to respond to those chemical changes, at the onset of the changes long before any adverse medical reactions occur, by alerting the parents or caregivers to the change at its onset. The parents and/or child are then able to check their blood sugar level and take appropriate action. Training Diabetic Alert Dogs for children means that we must train a dog that is unique in its ability to meet the needs of both the child with diabetes and the child’s family. Most agencies do not work with children, especially very young children. Here at 4 Paws we have no minimum age requirement and believe strongly in early intervention. In addition to the alert work, these dogs provide a measure of comfort for the child, increased self-esteem and confidence, a distraction during unpleasant medical procedures, and of course companionship. USA WEEKEND recently published an article on Megan Rittinger and her service dog, Pip. Full story . . . Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dog Brings Comfort, Relief To Boy And His Family

Diabetes Alert Dog Brings Comfort, Relief To Boy And His Family

Children with autism improve communication using horses and iPads Diabetes alert dog brings comfort, relief to boy and his family Kermit, a 2-year-old service dog trained to detect fluctuations in human blood sugar levels, helps 9-year-old Kiernan Sullivan monitor his type 1 diabetes, giving Kiernans parents some extra relief. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels can lead to problems such as neuropathy, limb loss and even blindness, so specially trained dogs, along with tools such as glucose monitors that help keep blood sugar levels within the normal range, can improve the quality of diabetes patients lives, said physician Andrew Ahmann. The Oregonian (Portland) When 9-year-old Kiernan Sullivan started school this month, he attends each class in the company of his new best friend a 2-year-old service dog named Kermit. Its fun but hard, Kiernan says of his new charge. You have to feed him, take him out to bathroom and take him out for walks. Kiernan has Type 1 diabetes , which usually affects children and young adults and accounts for about 5 percent of all diabetes cases. It occurs when the body does not produce insulin, a hormone needed to convert starches, sugars and other food into energy. Kiernan, who was diagnosed when he was six, experienced a grand mal seizure in November. The experience was scary, but his parents thought they could manage Kiernans disease with careful meal planning and regular insulin shots. Then one Saturday morning in March, Kiernans mom, Michelle Sullivan, awoke to a horrifying scene. Her husband, Stuart, had left early that morning to go grocery shopping so the family could do something together. He kissed her goodbye and closed the bedroom door so she could sleep in a bit. She awoke to her husbands terrified screams as he came home to find the Continue reading >>

How To Train Your Own Diabetes / Diabetic Alert Dog - About Our Trainer | Diabetic Alert Dog University - Videos About Training Your Own Diabetes Alert Dog

How To Train Your Own Diabetes / Diabetic Alert Dog - About Our Trainer | Diabetic Alert Dog University - Videos About Training Your Own Diabetes Alert Dog

Having attended the APDT conferences in 2009 , 2010 , and 2011 the 2010 and 2012 Clicker Expos , the Fear Aggression and Play Workshop , the Dr. Ian Dunbar seminar in May 2010, Diabetic Alert Dog Training classes in California in 2009 and classes with the top Narcotics Dog Detector for the Seattle Police Department in 2011, she is committed to continuing her education and professional development by continuously attending seminars and dog training conferences nationwide. Using only methods approved by the American Humane Association and positive reinforcement techniques, Mary is available for private training sessions as well as offering small group classes for both service and pet dog training in order to provide the best possible service that caters to your needs. Mary is also dedicated toward providing low-cost service dog training for people with disabilities ever since she had to become the resource she needed to train her own dog for service work. Currently, Mary is owned by her yellow lab who is a certified diabetic alert dog. A certified dog trainer who has experienced life before a service dog, and life with a service dog, Mary McNeight is the best resource to help train your pet or service dog. She can be found teaching at The Service Dog Academy at her dog training studio in the heart of West Seattle. Find out more on how Mary got started on King 5s television program Evening Magazine or watch it though this web link or clicking on the image below. Intensive Diabetic Alert Dog Workshop with head trainer Mary McNeight Diabetic Alert Dog University in cooperation with Service Dog Academy will be holding an Intensive Diabetic Alert Dog class in St. Louis Missouri November 16th - 19th 2017 (the next class after this will not be scheduled until APRIL OF 2018) and Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Alert Dogs (dads)?

What Are Diabetic Alert Dogs (dads)?

Diabetic Alert Dogs — affectionately known as DADs — are service dogs that are trained specifically to assist diabetics. Their primary task as service dogs is to alert diabetics of an oncoming hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic event (low or high blood sugar!) DADs are able to do this by reacting to particular smells that are emitted from the human body due to chemical shifts caused by either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia (undetected by a human nose). There are various ways that the dog can alert their human of a low or high blood sugar, which all depends on how it is trained. These skills require rigorous training from professional service dog trainers. In addition to being on alert for blood sugar malfunctions, Diabetic Alert Dogs are known to provide a tremendous amount of love and emotional support to its owner, resulting in an increased sense of security and balance in the daily life of someone with Type 1. How can I find my own DAD? Getting a Diabetic Alert Dog of your very own is a process. The first step is to find a legitimate, accredited organization made up of trainers that will assist you in both the acquiring and the training of your new DAD. Alternatively, there are Diabetic Alert Dog Training schools that will assist in the training and development of the dog of your own choosing. After being matched with the right dog for you, you may be asked to provide a “scent collection kit” so that your dog can learn your body chemistry during its training. Home visits are scheduled in order to begin the bonding process. Organizations & Resources How long do I have to wait for my dog? The average wait time for your DAD to be ready to come home with you for good is approximately six months to a year. What is the cost? The exact cost will depend on the particular o Continue reading >>

Service Dogs Can Be Trained To Alert Owners When Blood Sugar Is Low

Service Dogs Can Be Trained To Alert Owners When Blood Sugar Is Low

Service dogs can be trained to alert owners when blood sugar is low First-year graduate student Trevor Bell, who has had diabetes for more than a decade, is fundraising for his diabetes alert dog. Ive had diabetes for like 15 years, Bell said. Growing up, I always kind of looked into getting a diabetes alert dog because I go low all the time, like my blood sugar goes low all the time. After Bell came to Chapel Hill to pursue his doctoral degree, he found Eyes Ears Nose and Paws, a nonprofit organization located in Carrboro that trains and places assistance dogs to help people with specific illnesses. Its just hard because I dont really know anybody here, and I havent been able to establish myself in the community, Bell said. Luckily, some people on the Eyes Ears Nose and Paws board kind of reached out to me and have helped and all that stuff. Bell had met all the potential dog graduates in December. On March 25, he will graduate with his own dog, who is able to detect blood sugar changes and bump Bell when his blood sugar levels fluctuate too much. BOG approves business school tuition increases, other school fees The training process usually takes 20 months along with another three months of person-specific training, which matches the dog to its owner, said Katie Miller, a furlough trainer at Eyes Ears Nose and Paws. I have the dogs at home with me, and I bring them out in the community and train in public with them and just reinforced what they get in our inmate training program out in the community, Miller said. Client Services Specialist Rachel Robertson said Eyes Ears Nose and Paws has helped many individuals with disabilities improve their lives. We placed a dog in November, and the family was able to go Christmas shopping, and they hadnt been able to do that in 1 Continue reading >>

Scholarship For Free Diabetic Alert Dog 101 Class - Washington State Resident

Scholarship For Free Diabetic Alert Dog 101 Class - Washington State Resident

Scholarship For FREE Diabetic Alert Dog 101 Class - Washington State Resident We received a $500 donation from an anonymous donor, which when combined with the $200 in donations we have received over the last year will allow us to provide a full scholarship to the our Diabetic Alert Dog 101 class. The recipient must have a child with diabetes (as stipulated by the donor) for which the dog will be trained for. Additional stipulations include that the recipient must be a Washington State resident and from a low income household. The dog must be stably temperamented and have gone though our basic obedience class or trained with an approved training organization, such as classes run by a Karen Pryor Academy graduate. Additionally the student/parent must be able to blog/write about their experiences (both good and bad) training their own diabetic alert dog. If you would like to apply for this scholarship (the first of its kind) please email [email protected] about why we should pick your child and your dog. Service Dog Academy - www.servicedogacademy.com Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dog

Diabetes Alert Dog

Diabetes detection dog Tinker, and his diabetic owner A diabetic alert dog is an assistance dog trained to detect high (hyperglycemia) or low (hypoglycemia) levels of blood sugar in humans with diabetes and alert their owners to dangerous changes in blood glucose levels.[1] This allows their owners to take steps to return their blood sugar to normal, such as using glucose tablets, sugar and carbohydrate rich food. The dog can prompt a human to take insulin.[2] When owners with diabetes begin to experience hypoglycemia, the detection dogs perform a predetermined task (e.g. bark, lay down, sit) to inform the person.[3] Dogs may be directly smelling something related to the abnormal glucose concentration, or may be reacting to the owner's symptoms which are caused by hypoglycemia, such as sweating or shaking.[4] History[edit] The first dog trained to detect hypoglycemia was a Californian dog called Armstrong in 2003.[5] In 2009, a dog named Tinker from Durham City became the first British assistance dog to be officially registered for a type 2 diabetic owner. He was able to give his owner Paul Jackson up to half an hour warning before an attack occurred.[6] Training[edit] Diabetic alert dogs are trained to detect blood glucose changes using the saliva of diabetic patients. The diabetic person collects samples using gauze or dental cotton during a time when their blood sugar is just starting to get too low, or too high. Samples must be collected when the patient has not eaten within 30 minutes, brushed their teeth or used anything with a strong smell such as mouth wash in order to get the strongest scent for diabetes alert. Once the samples are collected, they are frozen and used in training dogs to alert to blood sugar changes. [7][8] Like all service dogs, diabetic respon Continue reading >>

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