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Diabetes Worksheet For Students

Active-learning Laboratory Session To Teach The Four M's Of Diabetes Care

Active-learning Laboratory Session To Teach The Four M's Of Diabetes Care

Active-Learning Laboratory Session to Teach the Four M's of Diabetes Care School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Purdue University Corresponding Author: Patricia L. Darbishire, PharmD, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University, 575 Stadium Mall Drive, Heine Pharmacy Building, Room 304A, West Lafayette, IN 47907. Tel: 765-494-1380. Fax: 765-494-0801. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2008 May 29; Accepted 2008 Jul 14. Copyright 2009-American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To implement an active-learning methodology for teaching diabetes care to pharmacy students and evaluate its effectiveness. Laboratory instruction was divided into 4 primary areas of diabetes care, referred to by the mnemonic, the 4 M's: meal planning, motion, medication, and monitoring. Students participated in skill-based learning laboratory stations and in simulated patient experiences. A pretest, retrospective pretest, and posttest were administered to measure improvements in students' knowledge about diabetes and confidence in providing care to diabetes patients. Students knowledge of and confidence in each area assessed improved. Students enjoyed the laboratory session and felt it contributed to their learning. An active-learning approach to teaching diabetes care allowed students to experience aspects of the disease from the patient's perspective. This approach will be incorporated in other content areas. Keywords: diabetes, active-learning techniques, practice laboratory Diabetes affects almost 24 million children and adults, or approximately 8% of the US population. While almost 18 million of those people have been diagnosed, nearly a third remain undiagnosed. 1 - 3 Furthermore, there are 57 million people Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Contents What is diabetes? How can you get it? What problems does it cause? What happens next? How to help your friend What some kids who live with diabetes say Did you know? What is diabetes? Diabetes happens when someone's body does not have enough insulin. A car needs fuel to give it the energy to keep working. Our bodies need fuel to give them the energy to keep working. We get the fuel from our food. Carbohydrates in food get changed into glucose, the main energy that our bodies use. This change happens in our gut and in our liver. Enzymes help this change (they are not the same enzymes as the ones in washing powder). These enzymes come from several different parts of our body including the pancreas [say pan-kree-ass]. The glucose travels around our bodies inside blood vessels but it cannot be used as energy until it gets into our body cells. Insulin is the key that lets the glucose go through the cell wall into our cells. Insulin is a hormone. If there is not enough insulin there can be a lot of glucose travelling around in the blood, but the cells do not have enough energy to work well, which makes people sick. Lots of small clumps of cells in the pancreas make insulin. These cells are called 'islets' because they are like little islands in the pancreas. The rest of the pancreas makes enzymes. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Children and young people usually get type 1, sometimes called 'juvenile diabetes'. (Juvenile [say joo-ven-ile is a word that means child or young person). People who get diabetes when they are older usually get type 2 diabetes. But more young people are getting Type 2 diabetes because they are overweight or obese. Dogs can get diabetes too! How can you get it? Type 1 diabetes happens when the 'islet' cells in the pan Continue reading >>

Diabetes At School - Classroom Presentation | Joslin Diabetes Center

Diabetes At School - Classroom Presentation | Joslin Diabetes Center

Classroom Presentation on Diabetes for Elementary School Age Children Be sure that the school, the family and the child with diabetes are comfortable with the idea of a classroom presentation. Decide the date, time, place, and format of the presentation with the school and child in advance. Your childmay want to help the presenter choose the specific topics to be discussed. Some children may also want to assist with presenting the information, while others may prefer to be part of the audience. The idea is to create an open, accepting environment in the classroom, not to make any child feel embarrassed or uncomfortable. There should not be any surprises for the child on the day of the presentation. Keep the presentation briefa maximum of15-20 minutes, including a question and answer period. Children are more likely to absorb information that is presented in a brief, concise format. More information is not necessarily better. Provide simple basic facts to begin with. Offer more detailed information only as the children ask for it, and they may not. Most children find it less embarrassing to have a doll or stuffed animal be the focus of a presentation. Simply find a doll or stuffed animal that the child likes and attach a medical identification bracelet to the arm. Bring a diabetes play kit rather than using the childs actual care kit for demonstration. A play diabetes care kit could include: Needless lancing device, needless syringe, an old bottle of insulin, alcohol wipes, a glucose meter, expired test strips, and a juice box or glucose tablets. Prepare for the question and answer period prior to arriving at the school. It is a good idea to contact one of your medical providers to review the basic information several weeks before the scheduled presentation. Everyone ne Continue reading >>

For The Classroom: Activities To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes In Children

For The Classroom: Activities To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes In Children

For the Classroom: Activities to Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Children For the Classroom: Activities to Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Children Marjorie Lanier, MPH Healthy Communities Facilitator, Southeastern NC Type 2 diabetes is a disease that results in blood sugar levels being too high. If blood sugar levels stay too high for too long, it can damage the heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and even the teeth and gums. In the past, only adults got type 2 diabetes. However, as more children and adolescents in the United States become overweight or obese and inactive, type 2 diabetes is on the rise among young people. The Centers for Disease Control estimate that approximately 17% (or 12.7 million) of children and adolescents in the United States aged 219 yearsare obese. The first stage in the development of type 2 diabetes is often insulin resistance, requiring increasing amounts of insulin to be produced by the pancreas to control blood glucose levels. Initially, the pancreas responds by producing more insulin, but after several years, insulin production may decrease and diabetes develops. Type 2 diabetes usually develops slowly and may occur without symptoms. Diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. A child may be at high risk if he or she: Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck or armpits A child should also see his or her doctor if any of the signs or symptoms of diabetes are present increased thirst and urination, increased hu Continue reading >>

10 Fun And Useful Diabetes Printables

10 Fun And Useful Diabetes Printables

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney Make your life easier and your childs day brighter with these handy projects. Help your child celebrate a year of living life to the fullest with type 1 diabetes. Help your family share its wishes, hopes, and dreams and mark the occasion when one comes true. Be brave like Piglet. Whistle with Jiminy Cricket. Let our cast of characters help cheer your child on. Easily keep track of the carb counts in bagged food, leftovers, and more with these adorable food labels. Mickey and Minnie help stir up success in the kitchen with these cute recipe cards, complete with carb and serving info. Let this handy meal planner help you map out the weeks meals and snacks. Tick off the T1D essentials youll want to take for a trip of one night or more away from home. Organize the info your doctor is likely to ask for along with the issues youd like to bring up. Print out these cards and at your next appointment, have your child color them in great waiting-room activity! Fill in the details of your childs care routine and leave this as a reference for your sitter. Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these articles are not intended as medical advice, and they are not necessarily the typical experiences of families with a child who has type 1 diabetes. These situations are unique to the families depicted. Families should check with their healthcare professionals regarding the treatment of type 1 diabetes and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring. Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a daily challenge. There are so many variables to keep in mind -- food, exercise, stress, general health, etc. -- that keeping blood sugar levels in the desired range is a constant balancing act. We want to make managing diabetes easier. So, the DRI's Education Team hasdeveloped short brochures about the topics listed below -- offering useful tips on many of the day-to-day issues facing people living with diabetes. And, most of the materials are offered in English and Spanish. If you can benefit by learning about one or more of these subjects, just click on the title to expand. Do you know what foods have the greatest impact on your blood sugars? If you answered CARBOHYDRATE FOODS...youre right! Carbohydrates -- "carbs" -- are broken down into glucose. So if you eat too much of them, your blood sugar level may rise. For this reason, people with diabetes find it helpful to keep track of the carbs they eat in order to manage their blood sugars. Carb counting is easy. It just takes some practice at first. Caring for older people with diabetes requires special thought and consideration. The older individual is more likely to have other health problems and may be taking a variety of different medications. Many people are frightened to check their blood sugar -- or "blood glucose" -- levels because they do not want to see levels that are higher or lower than their target range. But, checking blood sugar at home, in school, and in the workplace is key to managing diabetes. It puts you in control of your diabetes. Remember, your blood sugar levels remain the same whether you know about them or not. Checking blood sugar levels is the most accurate way to see if your lifestyle changes and medications are helping you to better manage your diabetes. If levels Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lesson Plan For Elementary School

Diabetes Lesson Plan For Elementary School

Diabetes Lesson Plan for Elementary School Watch short & fun videos Start Your Free Trial Today Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course. Custom Courses are courses that you create from Study.com lessons. Use them just like other courses to track progress, access quizzes and exams, and share content. Organize and share selected lessons with your class. Make planning easier by creating your own custom course. Create a new course from any lesson page or your dashboard. Click "Add to" located below the video player and follow the prompts to name your course and save your lesson. Click on the "Custom Courses" tab, then click "Create course". Next, go to any lesson page and begin adding lessons. Edit your Custom Course directly from your dashboard. Name your Custom Course and add an optional description or learning objective. Create chapters to group lesson within your course. Remove and reorder chapters and lessons at any time. Share your Custom Course or assign lessons and chapters. Share or assign lessons and chapters by clicking the "Teacher" tab on the lesson or chapter page you want to assign. Students' quiz scores and video views will be trackable in your "Teacher" tab. You can share your Custom Course by copying and pasting the course URL. Only Study.com members will be able to access the entire course. Teach your students about diabetes with this lesson plan. A text lesson guides your student through facts about diabetes which students analyze and discuss before applying understanding to a project. After this lesson, students will be able to: describe characteristics of type 1 and 2 diabetes Copies of the lesson Diabetes Facts: Lesson for Kids , one for each student Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; sum Continue reading >>

How To Help Students Implement Effective Diabetes Management

How To Help Students Implement Effective Diabetes Management

Check Blood Glucose Levels Plan for Disposal of Sharp Objects and Materials That Come in Contact with Blood Recognize and Treat Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose) Recognize and Treat Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Administer Insulin and/or Other Diabetes Medication Plan for Disasters and Emergencies Follow an Individualized Meal Plan Promote Regular Physical Activity Help to Maintain a Healthy Weight Plan for Special Events, Field Trips, and Extracurricular Activities Deal with Emotional and Social Issues Understand Why Diabetes Self-Management Is Important Diabetes management involves checking blood glucose levels throughout the day, following an individualized meal plan, getting regular physical activity, and administering insulin and/or blood glucose-lowering medications. These actions are taken to help maintain blood glucose levels in the target range and to prevent hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Students with diabetes must have access to supplies and equipment for immediate treatment of high and low blood glucose levels at all times. Additional elements of effective diabetes management in school include: planning for appropriate disposal of sharp objects and materials that come in contact with blood; planning for disasters, emergencies, and lockdowns; planning for school-sponsored events outside the usual school day; and dealing with the emotional and social aspects of living with diabetes. Check Blood Glucose Levels One of the most important diabetes management tasks is to check (or monitor) blood glucose levels throughout the day using a blood glucose meter or a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Students who use a CGM also use a blood glucose meter to verify CGM readings. Blood Glucose Meter A blood glucose meter is a small portable machine used to check blood Continue reading >>

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by JDRF Millions of people around the world live with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a life-threatening autoimmune disease that strikes both children and adults. JDRF is the leading global organization funding research that will one day create a world without T1D. By joining JDRF Kids Walk, not only can your students make a difference for those living with T1D, but it’s fun and easy for everyone involved! Find out how your school can help today. As an educator, you provide an extremely important set of eyes and ears for students. Since you see them throughout the day, you notice when things are different, off or just not quite right. This is incredibly helpful and comforting to parents because teachers often uncover important and even life-changing discoveries. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of those diseases that teachers can often see signs of in the classroom, so it’s important to know what to look for. Take a look at some of these warning signs, and also get tips about how to accommodate a child with T1D in your classroom. 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is not related to lifestyle, nor is it the result of anything the child (or family) did or did not do. Normally, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose (“blood sugar”) for energy. In people who have T1D, the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells and the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, so blood sugar levels can rise if unchecked. A person with T1D needs insulin injections or infusions to live. 2. Excessive urination, thirst and hunger are all symptoms of T1D. Because teachers spend so much time with kids, they may be among the first to notice symptoms that could be linked to diabetes. A child who is asking to use the bath Continue reading >>

About Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes,

About Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes,

The following pages teach research, advocacy, and the importance of health and physical activity. This curriculum may be reproduced and distributed to students. These materials are reproducible. For more information, fundraising tips, and classroom tools, please visit kidswalk.jdrf.org JDRF KiDs WalK to CuRe Diabetes Classroom ToolkiT JDRF KiDs WalK to CuRe Diabetes | Classroom ToolkiT 2 Classroom ToolkiT 2 Classroom Curriculum overview 3 Diabetes Basics 4 lesson 1 What is Diabetes? 6 activity 1 Diabetes—so many Questions 7 activity 2 Fill-in-the-Blank mystery 8 activity 3 Topsy Turvy: Where Does the Food Go? 9 activity 4 The Truth about Type 1 Diabetes 10 lesson 2 The search for a Cure 11 activity 1 role Play: researchers Wanted 12 activity 2 research maze 13 lesson 3 You Can make a Difference! 14 activity 1 Be a Friend 15 activity 2 Be an advocate 16 activity 3 What Would You Do? 17 lesson 4 You are What You Eat 18 activity 1 Fruit and Vegetable survey 19 activity 2 see more, Eat more! 20 lesson 5 Get moving! 21 activity 1 activity list 22 activity 2 activity Journal 23 rEsourCEs 24 ansWEr kEY 25 HoW To usE THE Classroom ToolkiT The Classroom Toolkit is designed for you to use in conjunction with the JDrF kids Walk to Cure Diabetes. The materials contained in the Classroom Toolkit are designed to assist teachers in explaining the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the need for proper nutrition and physical activity, and the need to cure, treat, and prevent type 1 diabetes (T1D). JDrF encourages teachers to reproduce all materials for use in their classrooms. The activities in the kids Walk curriculum are targeted to students in grades k–5. some worksheets are geared toward elementary school–age students, while others are more appropri Continue reading >>

How To Teach ... Diabetes

How To Teach ... Diabetes

Do you know the difference between the two types of diabetes? Here’s a quick refresher: type 1 is where your body destroys the cells that make insulin, which means that your glucose levels increase, potentially damaging your organs. It can develop at any time, but is often discovered in childhood and requires daily doses of insulin. Type 2, on the other hand, means that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or doesn’t react to it. Symptoms can be controlled with diet, exercise and monitoring blood glucose levels. It is linked to obesity and usually develops in later life; it also accounts for 90% of all UK cases. The disease is at once complex, common (it affects 4 million people in the UK) and scary – prevalence rates are rising and about half of cases are thought to be undiagnosed. So how can you discuss it with your students? Primary This video, from Diabetes UK, uses simple, child-friendly language to explain what type 1 diabetes is and how it affects the body. An extreme zoom takes viewers inside a person with diabetes: there we meet talking cells and flying insulin and glucose, detailing how treatment works and how to handle a diagnosis. The charity has a huge number of resources aimed at children who have diabetes, including guidance sheets about exploring the outdoors safely and taking care in cold weather. Advice includes wearing a diabetes wristband in case of an emergency and keeping a testing kit and snacks to hand. The idea of testing blood and injecting insulin can be intimidating. Give your students a look at a day in the life of a diabetic with this pack from the International Diabetes Federation. It uses a cartoon strip to demystify the process of checking blood sugar levels, as well as offering advice on how to keep active and eat healthily Continue reading >>

Care Of Students With Diabetes In Schools: Frequently Asked Questions

Care Of Students With Diabetes In Schools: Frequently Asked Questions

The law was signed on October 1, 2009 and is effective January 29, 2010. Does the law apply to nonpublic schools or early childhood programs? No. The law defines a school as an elementary or secondary public school located within the state. Who coordinates diabetes care in the school? The law requires the school nurse to coordinate the provision of diabetes care at that school. The school nurse develops the individualized healthcare plan (IHP) and an emergency healthcare plan (IEHP), communicates regularly with the student, parents/guardians, and the healthcare team, and documents care. Why does the law require an individualized healthcare plan (IHP) and an emergency healthcare plan (IEHP)? The IHP and the IEHP are developed by the school nurse, in consultation with the parent/guardian and other appropriate medical professionals, to establish a set of procedural guidelines and directions for the care of the student with diabetes while at school or at school-sponsored activities. What information must be included in the IHP/IEHP? The law states each individualized health care plan (IHP) shall include, and each individualized emergency healthcare plan may include the following information: the symptoms of hypoglycemia and recommended treatment; the symptoms of hyperglycemia and recommended treatment; written orders from the students physician or advanced practice nurse outlining the dosage and indications for insulin administration and glucagon, if needed; the times of meals and snacks and indications for snacks with exercise; full participation in exercise and sports and any contraindications or accommodations; accommodations for field trips, after school activities, parties, and other school-related activities; medical and treatment issues that may impact the education Continue reading >>

Disease Specific Ecp | Ihp | 504 |diabetes Addendum | Flow Sheets

Disease Specific Ecp | Ihp | 504 |diabetes Addendum | Flow Sheets

Disease Specific ECP | IHP | 504 |Diabetes Addendum | Flow Sheets Diabetes Medical Managment Plans| Addendum-Role of Parents In Insulin Dose|IHP Hypo/Hyperglycemia|504 Plan Resources Math CalculationCheckerWorksheet for Insulin Deviation-This worksheet may be used to verify that math calculations performed by the RN are correct.(9/2017) Sample Individual Health Care Plan (8/18) Seizure Sample Care Plans | 504 Plans | Interview Questionnaire for Seizure History Information and resources provided do not constitute or infer an endorsement of specific programs by the New York State Education Department (NYSED) or the State. NYSED is not responsible for the content of the individual organization materials or external website links provided as resources. Information and resources provided do not constitute or infer an endorsement of specific programs by the New York State Education Department (NYSED) or the State. NYSED is not responsible for the content of the individual organization materials or external website links provided as resources. Continue reading >>

Teaching Diabetes To Middle-school Students With The Www.2aida.net Aida Online Diabetes Software Simulator

Teaching Diabetes To Middle-school Students With The Www.2aida.net Aida Online Diabetes Software Simulator

Teaching Diabetes to Middle-School Students with the www.2aida.net AIDA Online Diabetes Software Simulator Andres Palacio , M.D.,1 Eldon D. Lehmann , M.B. B.S., B.Sc. (Hons.), Ph.D., F.R.C.R.,2,3 and Darin E. Olson , M.D., Ph.D.1,4 2Department of Imaging (MRU), Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine (NHLI), Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom 3Department of Imaging, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1Division of Endocrinology Metabolism & Lipids, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 1Division of Endocrinology Metabolism & Lipids, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 2Department of Imaging (MRU), Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine (NHLI), Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom 3Department of Imaging, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Correspondence to: Dr. Eldon D. Lehmann, Ph.D., F.R.C.R., c/o www.2aida.org Diabetes Simulator Development Team, P.O. Box 38265, London NW3 7XZ, United Kingdom, [email protected] Disclosure: The AIDA and AIDA online software referred to in this report is an independent, noncommercial development that is being made available free-of-charge via a not-for-profit Web site as a noncommercial contribution to continuing diabetes education. Dr. Lehmann is a co-developer of the AIDA and AIDA online diabetes simulators, and Webmaster of www.2aida.org and www.2aida.net . Copyright 2007 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The lifetime risk of developing diabetes for students born in the new millennium in the United States is estimated to be 27% to 52%. Many students need to learn about diabetes for their personal care, or desire to learn about diabetes to develop a career in healthcare. Most teenagers are adept at l Continue reading >>

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Nurse Files: Includes Individualized Health Plans

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Nurse Files: Includes Individualized Health Plans

Nurse Files: includes Individualized Health Plans Contains Instructions, Individualized Health Plans, Standards of Care, Provider Order forms, Documentation records/logs and resources Standards of Care for Diabetes Management in the School Setting 2017 :These standards of care for students with Type 1 Diabetes are to be used in conjunction with the Colorado Provider Orders & Individualized Health Plans. The students health care provider may indicate exceptions to these standards on the students individual orders. These Standards were originally developed in 2013 by theColorado Kids with Diabetes Care and Prevention Collaborative of local health care providers, nurses and stakeholders and are updated annually. Guidelines of Insulin Management :Practicalguidelines on insulin management in Colorado Collaborative Guidelines for Dexcom G5 Non-Adjunctive Dosing :These guidelines are to be used if parents have requested to use the Dexcom G5 (only) for Non-Adjunctive Insulin dosing. Guiding Principles Chronic Health Conditions : Guidance from the Colorado Department of Education and the American Diabetes Association Bus Emergency Medication on Bus 2013 :Provided by the Colorado Department of Education guidelines for medication administration on school buses. ADA CGM Guidance Nov 2016 : Guidance from the American Diabetes Association regarding the use of CGM in the school setting #502 Insulin Carb Calculation worksheet : Documentation tool for daily Insulin Carb dosing #505 School Reporting Form-BDC : Optional form to report Blood Glucose that are out of range #720 Low-High BS Hands A great visual tool that lists the symptoms, causes and how to problem solve both high and low blood sugars on one piece of paper.Great reference for classroom teachers, substitute teachers, aids an Continue reading >>

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