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Diabetes Wisconsin

Diabetes: Facts And Figures

Diabetes: Facts And Figures

Quick Facts 40% of Wisconsin adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime.1 8% of Wisconsin adults have diabetes.2 28% of Wisconsin adults have diabetes and don't know it.3 37% of Wisconsin adults have prediabetes.3 Approximately 356,000 adults and 6,500 children and adolescents in Wisconsin have been diagnosed with diabetes.2,4,5 It is estimated that an additional 138,000 have diabetes but are undiagnosed.3 The direct (medical care) and indirect (lost productivity) costs of diabetes in Wisconsin total an estimated $3.9 billion annually.6 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.7 What is diabetes? According to the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. The three main types of diabetes are: type 1 diabetes (link is external), type 2 diabetes (link is external), and gestational diabetes (link is external). Another condition called prediabetes (link is external) is almost always a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Modest behavior changes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people who have prediabetes. More Facts and Figures For diabetes data on the national, state, and county levels, see the CDC Data and Statisti Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Part Of The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program

Diabetes: Part Of The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program

Diabetes in Wisconsin Diabetes is a costly, complex, and devastating chronic illness that poses a major public health problem. Approximately 356,000 adults and 6,500 children and adolescents in Wisconsin have been diagnosed with diabetes.1,2,3 It is estimated that an additional 138,000 have diabetes but are undiagnosed.4 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in Wisconsin, incurring an estimated $3.9 billion annually in health care and lost productivity costs.5 Each year, more than 1,300 Wisconsin residents die from diabetes and many more suffer disabling complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and amputations.6 This burden is higher among minority populations. Much of the health and economic burden of diabetes can be averted through known prevention measures. Nearly 4 out of 10 Wisconsin adults has prediabetes. Modest behavior changes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people who have prediabetes. 2 out of 5 Wisconsin adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Diabetes causes high blood glucose (blood sugar) levels that can lead to serious health problems. Diabetes and the Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program The Wisconsin Chronic Disease Prevention Program (CDPP) works with health systems, health care providers, insurers, and professional organizations across the state to support a healthier Wisconsin by improving the prevention and management of diabetes. With funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the CDPP manages several projects to enhance coordinated systems of care, promote clinical best practices, and support patient self-care and health literacy. Increasing use of diabetes self-management programs and chronic disease self-management programs in communit Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gum Disease

Diabetes And Gum Disease

Overview Dental disease is infectious. It can be transmitted through the sharing of utensils, toothbrushes and anything else that permits the exchange of saliva. There is no “vaccine” for preventing dental disease. Dental disease prevention requires active involvement of both the patient and a dentist. It includes regular examinations (with X-rays), diagnosis and treatment planning by a dentist, fluoride applications as needed, dental sealants and restorative treatment. Patient education, healthy dietary habits and daily oral hygiene practices are also important. TOP What is periodontal disease? Severe periodontal (gum) disease often leads to tooth loss, but recent scientific research suggests a link to a variety of common, non-oral health conditions, including heart disease. Our teeth are covered with a sticky film of bacteria called plaque. Brushing after meals and snacks and flossing between teeth daily helps remove plaque. Plaque that is not removed may harden into calculus. When calculus accumulates either above or below the gumline, the gum tissue becomes irritated and inflamed. The early stage of periodontal (gum) disease is called gingivitis. Symptoms of periodontal disease include: Persistent bad breath Gums that bleed when teeth are brushed Red, swollen and tender gums Gums that have pulled away from the teeth Loose or separating teeth Pus between the gum and tooth A change in one’s bite Periodontal diseases are serious bacterial infections that destroy the attachment fibers and supporting bone that hold your teeth in your mouth. When this happens, gums separate from the teeth, forming pockets that fill with plaque and even more infection. The more advanced the disease, the deeper the pockets. Diabetes and gum disease While severe periodontal disease oft Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Home> Medical care> Pediatric Diabetes Program> Diabetes overview> Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes accounts for over 80% of diabetes cases diagnosed before 19 years of age. It is caused by an autoimmune process that destroys the insulin- producing cells in the pancreas known as beta cells. Besides producing insulin, beta cells are able to sense how much sugar is entering the blood and control how much insulin is released at all times to maintain blood sugars levels within a very tight range. A nearly complete loss of beta cells results in severe insulin deficiency and the inability to regulate blood sugar levels. Since insulin is needed to transport of sugar into the body’s cells, the body becomes severely starved. Starvation causes the body break down the fat energy reserves and release ketones to provide an alternative supply of fuel to the brain. However, when the body can’t transport enough sugar into the cells, ketones are produced in very large amounts causing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA can be fatal if not caught on time but fortunately, that rarely happens. People with untreated type 1 diabetes frequently experience very rapid weight loss due to starvation. Type 1 diabetes may also be known by a variety of other names, including: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Juvenile diabetes Brittle diabetes Sugar diabetes There are two forms of type 1 diabetes: Idiopathic type 1 - refers to rare forms of the disease with no known caus. Immune-mediated diabetes - is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Immune-mediated diabetes is the most common form of type 1 diabetes and is generally referred to as type 1 diabetes. The risk of developing type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Wisconsin: American Diabetes Association

Wisconsin: American Diabetes Association

Are applicants for a driver's license asked questions about diabetes? Yes. The driver's license application (first-time and renewal) asks an applicant whether he or she, during the preceding year, has experienced an episode of loss of consciousness or muscle control caused by any of a list of conditions, including diabetes and a seizure disorder, and must list the dates of these episodes. Wisconsin Department of Transportation, "Driver License (DL) Application," Form MV3001 (Rev. 12/2012). Any applicant who answers yes to this question must submit with his or her application a letter of explanation and may be required to undergo a medical evaluation. Wis. Stat. 343.16(5)(a) (2013) (authorizing examinations for applicants with conditions preventing reasonable and ordinary control over vehicle); Wis. Admin. Code Trans. 112.03(5) (2013) (authorizing examinations when licensing agency learns that person applying for or renewing license has medical condition affecting safe driving). What other ways does the state have to find out about people who may not be able to drive safely because of a medical condition? The state accepts reports of potentially unsafe drivers from police officers, the courts, physicians, family members, friends, other citizens, and hospitals. Wis. Stat. 343.16(5)(a), (6)(a) (2013); Wis. Admin. Code Trans. 107.04(1)(d) (listing sources of information considered in licensing decisions). Individuals may use a specific form to report potentially unsafe drivers. Wisconsin Department of Transportation, "Driver Condition or Behavior Report," Form MV3141 (Rev. 01/2013). The licensing agency does not accept anonymous reports, and the report form is available upon request by the driver. The licensing agency investigates reports if there is concern regarding mali Continue reading >>

The Wisconsin Lions Diabetes Education

The Wisconsin Lions Diabetes Education

Local community-based diabetes education for patients, health professionals and the public Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in people aged 20-74. It is also a major cause of complications including much higher incidences of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, kidney problems, nerve damage, and amputations. Diabetes awareness was adopted as a long-term commitment of Lions International in March 1984. The primary objective of the Lions project was to reduce the number of new cases of blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy (a common complication of uncontrolled diabetes) through diabetes education, early detection and treatment, and support of research. Wisconsin Lions Foundation actively supports efforts to inform, educate, and to help prevent and control diabetes. Wisconsin Lions are uniquely positioned to help serve because of their reach into nearly 600 communities. An estimated 4000+ Wisconsin Lions have diabetes. In 1999, the Wisconsin Lions Foundation received a $100,000 grant from the Lions Clubs International Foundation and undertook development of a major new initiative: a community-based diabetes education project for patients, health professionals, and the public. WLF supports planning and communication programs of local club organization and community diabetes awareness leadership building. As part of that effort, an easy-to-follow Club Community Diabetes Manual and materials for several model projects was developed. These include press releases for community newspaper public service announcements, handout brochures and more. Lions, through WLF, are the only service organization represented on the Diabetes Advisory Group (90 + health care experts) guided by the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program of the Wisconsin Division Continue reading >>

Diabetes Research | University Of Wisconsin - Department Of Medicine

Diabetes Research | University Of Wisconsin - Department Of Medicine

Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes & mechanisms of beta cell destruction The initiating event in type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune attack on insulin-producing cells. Type 1 diabetes research studies at UW investigate the mechanism of this attack to understand how to prevent it. Our faculty members are also developing new approaches to increasing pancreatic beta cell mass in type 1 diabetics, thereby restoring insulin production. Frequently associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes occurs when insulin production decreases and/or the body becomes resistant to insulin, preventing efficient regulation of blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes research at UW focuses on understanding and preventing this dysfunction, as well as generating improved therapies and diabetes management approaches. To develop new therapies to prevent, treat, and manage diabetes, several of our faculty are investigating pancreatic beta cells, the bodys insulin-producing cells. University of Wisconsin diabetes research investigators are focusing on how these cells proliferate and how pulses of insulin release are triggered. Translating diabetes research breakthroughs to the clinic improves patients lives through better treatment and diabetes management. UW Health is a study site for several clinical trials investigating new medications and devices for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To learn more about volunteering for a research study in Wisconsin, visit the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research . Continue reading >>

Pediatric Diabetes And Endocrinology

Pediatric Diabetes And Endocrinology

Services for Adults UW Health endocrinologists, a group that includes our diabetes specialists in Madison, Wisconsin, provide services for patients with a wide variety of endocrine disorders, including juvenile diabetes. Our staff commonly evaluates and treats problems of the thyroid, adrenal and pituitary glands. Diabetes education, counseling and treatment, including the genetics of diabetes Evaluation and treatment of a wide range of endocrine gland conditions Thorough medical histories and preliminary examinations Comprehensive education regarding diagnosis, testing and all aspects of treatment Coordination of care between UW Health pediatric endocrinologists and your child's primary physician News Identification Continue reading >>

Wisconsin: American Diabetes Association

Wisconsin: American Diabetes Association

This information was prepared by the American Diabetes Association, a national leader in diabetes information and advocacy. It covers state rules on diabetes care in Colorado schools, and may not include all the important details. We strive to be constantly up to date, but laws can change. It is not a substitute for professional legal advice. 1. Does Wisconsin allow people who are not health care professionals to administer insulin at school? Yes. Wisconsin allows both public and private school employees or other volunteers to administer prescription drugs, including insulin: a school bus operator [] [or] any school employee or volunteer [] [m]ay administer a prescription drug to a pupil in compliance with the written instructions of a practitioner if the pupils parent or guardian consents in writing; the prescription drug is supplied by the pupils parent or guardian in the original pharmacy-labeled package; and the package specifies the name of the pupil, the name of the prescriber, the name of the prescription drug, the dose, the effective date, and the directions in a legible format. Wis. Stat. 118.29(2)(a) . 2. Does Wisconsin allow people who are not health care professionals to administer glucagon at school? Yes. Wisconsin specifically allows trained public and private school employees or other volunteers to administer glucagon: any school employee or volunteer [] may administer glucagon to any pupil who the school bus driver, employee, or volunteer knows is diabetic and who appears to be experiencing a severe low blood sugar event with altered consciousness if, as soon as practicable, the school bus operator, employee, or volunteer reports the event by dialing the telephone number "911" or, in an area in which the telephone number "911" is not available, the tele Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program

Diabetes Prevention Program

Prediabetes means your blood glucose (sugar) is higher than normal, but not yet diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease that can cause heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, or loss of feet and legs. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented in people with prediabetes, or who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, through effective lifestyle programs. Read more about diabetes prevention in New Connections to Better Health. The Diabetes Prevention Program is a high-level, evidence-based behavior-change course introduced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for people who have prediabetes or are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The year-long course, led by trained lifestyle coaches, consists of 16 one-hour core classes held over a 6-month period and six one-hour post-core classes held over a six-month period that include topics such as eating healthy, increasing physical activity, and losing weight. Classes are highly participative. Mutual support and success build participants’ confidence in their ability to manage their health condition and maintain active and fulfilling lives. The program is facilitated by trained lifestyle coaches in a classroom style, but most of the learning comes from sharing and helping others with similar challenges. Who should consider taking the Diabetes Prevention Program? You are eligible to participate in this program if: You are 18 years of age or older You are overweight (BMI >24, or >22 if you are Asian American) AND, one of the below: You have received a medical diagnosis of prediabetes within the past 12 months You have a history of gestational diabetes or given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more You score 9 or more points on the Prediabetes Quiz. For more information, contact: (262) 573-3983 Chr Continue reading >>

Wisconsin Lions Camp Wisconsin Lions Camp

Wisconsin Lions Camp Wisconsin Lions Camp

Join us for a week away from home to experience the adventure of the lifetime! Come swim and boat on Lions Lake, explore in our environmental education program, hit a target in archery, climb to new heights on our climbing tower, high ropes and zip line, create lasting art and performance projects, enjoy a campfire and wallow in our mud pit. Meet other childrenand adults from Wisconsin and build lasting friendships in a safe environment. This quality camping experience is provided free-of-charge to eligible childrenand adults with disabilities from Wisconsin. We serve childrenand adults who are blind or visually impaired, Deaf or Hard of Hearing, childrenwith intellectual disabilities or educational autismand childrenwith diabetes. A chance remark, Blind kids cant go to outdoor camps and stuff like that started it all in 1955 and in 1956, the Lions Clubs of the State of Wisconsin founded the Wisconsin Lions Camp and the Wisconsin Lions Foundation, Inc. to administer the Camp program. From that humble beginning with 26 campers, we are proud to serve over 1,300 campers a summer. Continue reading >>

Wausau Dad Accused Of Letting Diabetic Son Bryden Glazner Die

Wausau Dad Accused Of Letting Diabetic Son Bryden Glazner Die

CONNECT TWEET LINKEDIN 5 COMMENTEMAILMORE WAUSAU - A Wausau mancharged with homicide in his diabetic son's death did not check his son's glucose levels or seek medical help even after the son was sick and vomiting all day, court records say. Robert Glazner was charged Wednesday with second-degree reckless homicide in the death of his son, Bryden Glazner. He is being held in the Marathon County jail on a cash bond of $500,000. Bryden,15, died Aug. 4 from diabetes complications while in the care of his father in Wausau. Robert Glaznerwas arrested Tuesday in Sheboygan and brought back to Wausau. Glazner's attorney said Wednesday that Glazner moved recently because of all that had happened in Marathon County. Bryden, a student at Mosinee High School,was living with Glazner at the home of Bryden's grandmother Linda Glaznerinthe 900 Block of Parcher Street, according to the criminal complaint. Linda Glaznerarrived home and found Bryden cold to the touch and called police, she said, according to the complaint. Autopsy and toxicology tests determined he had died from alack of care for his diabetes,according tothe Wausau Police Department. Bryden was diagnosed in December 2014 with Type 1 diabetes after being taken to the hospital because he hadn't stopped vomiting for four days, and was thirsty, the complaint said. Doctors determined he was suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis a potentially fatal condition and that Bryden's father needed to help him manage the disease. Bryden's parents were divorced, and he was staying with each parent on a rotating basis. Bryden's mother,Lynn Koshalek, told USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin on Wednesdaythat Robert Glazner's arrestis like reliving her son's death. "All I can say is that I tried to get help," she said in a brief telephone interview, Continue reading >>

Wmj: Wisconsins Hmong At Increased Risk For Diabetes

Wmj: Wisconsins Hmong At Increased Risk For Diabetes

Improve the health of the people of Wisconsin by supporting and strengthening physicians' ability to practice high-quality patient care in a changing environment. WMJ: Wisconsins Hmong at increased risk for diabetes Contact: Jennifer Wieman - 608.442.3765 [email protected] MADISON (November 16, 2015)Type 2 diabetes is becoming more prevalent among Wisconsins Hmong population, according to a study published in the current issue of WMJ . In fact, they are 3.3 times more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than their non-Hispanic white counterparts, the study reports. The studys authors analyzed data from 964 Hmong and 412,908 non-Hispanic white patients from UW clinics throughout Wisconsin from 2007 to 2012. They found that the overall prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the Hmong population was over 11 percent (11.3), compared to almost 6 percent (5.97) in the white population. Among adults (more than 18 years old), 19.1 percent Hmong patients were at risk for diabetes, compared to just 7.78 percent of non-Hispanic white patients. The data also indicate the prevalence of diabetes stratified across age group, BMI (body mass index) category, and insurance type is significantly higher in the Hmong population than the non-Hispanic white population, the authors wrote. Diabetes also is being diagnosed at higher proportions in younger, thinner Hmong patients compared to their white counterparts, the authors noted. Over 7 percent of Hmong (7.45) of normal weight are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes compared to only 1.38 percent of whites. The authors cited change in environment as one of several plausible explanations as to why Hmong patients are at an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. A large influx of Hmong immigrants from southeast Asia, which has low rates of diabete Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes A Dui Defense In Wisconsin?

Is Diabetes A Dui Defense In Wisconsin?

Posted by Attorney Stangl on December 18, 2015 "People with severe hypoglycemia may appear as if they're intoxicated." -Mayo Clinic Staff If you were recently surprised to be pulled over on suspicion of drunk driving (OWI, DUI, DWI, BAC or PAC charges) and have diabetes or suffer from hypoglycemia due to another medical condition, it is important to find an attorney who understands the importance and complexity of taking your health into consideration in your legal defense. Could my health be the cause of my erratic driving? What many people may not know, including some law enforcement officers in the field, is that there are many medical conditions, such as diabetes, which can cause a driver to present symptomatic behaviors similar to those associated with intoxication, but for very different reasons. First, it is important to understand what law enforcement watches for on the road and why there may have been confusion. The U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) established guidelines to help law enforcement try to predict driver blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0.08 percent or greater based on observed driver behavior. The NHTSA's guidelines detail 24 different driver cues, which fall under the following four categories: Problems in maintaining proper lane position Often, people do not realize at the time of arrest that hypoglycemia can be the cause of the kind of driving cues law enforcement is watching for, but may not always be considered before an OWI arrest is made. "The symptoms of too much alcohol and low blood sugar can be very similar...You don't want others to mistakenly confuse hypoglycemia for drunkenness." - Mayo Clinic Those living life managing diabetes are likely already familiar with the sympto Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Public Resources

Diabetes: Public Resources

Are You at Risk? Type 2 diabetes prevention is possible, powerful, and proven! It is important to find out early if you are at risk for type 2 diabetes or if you have prediabetes. To find out your risk, take this quick Risk Test (link is external) from the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or complete the Take the Test. Know Your Score. risk assessment below the navigation on this page. If you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, there are many things you can do! Learn more at the CDC Preventing or Delaying Type 2 Diabetes (link is external) page. Additional information about prediabetes can be found at CDC's The Surprising Truth About Prediabetes (link is external) page. Also, don't forget to check out your source for local and national diabetes resources: www.DiabetesLocal.org (link is external). Taking Care of Your Diabetes Diabetes Self-Care Booklet: English, 12 pages (PDF, 847 KB) This 12-page booklet explains diabetes, diabetes self-care, and lists the tests, exams, and medical checks you need to have in order to take care of your diabetes. Personal Diabetes Care Record: English, 2 pages (PDF, 553 KB) This two-page wallet card provides a place for you to record tests, exams, and medical checks you need to have in order to take care of your diabetes. Blood Sugar Log Booklet: This booklet provides a place to record three months of blood sugar test results. Cholesterol and Blood Pressure Cholesterol and blood pressure are important to keep track of when you have diabetes. Your doctor should monitor your cholesterol and blood pressure regularly. For information about cholesterol and blood pressure, click on the following links: Diabetes and Heart Disease Diabetes increases a person's risk for heart disease. About three-quarters of people Continue reading >>

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