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Diabetes Where You Can't Have Sugar

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Risk Factors: What You Can And Can’t Avoid

Diabetes Prevention And Risk Factors: What You Can And Can’t Avoid

There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, and, depending on the type, there are also ways to prevent the disease. Even when it’s not possible to prevent diabetes, there are ways to lessen its effects. If you have Type I diabetes, managing your condition is the main focus. This type of diabetes comes about from a lack of insulin production in the body, and is generally not considered to be preventable. Type II diabetes, however, can be caused by lifestyle choices. That means you can make changes that can improve or even reverse your condition, or stop you from getting diabetes in the first place. For purposes of this article, the focus will be on Type II diabetes. Tobacco Use Can Be a Factor People who smoke are more likely to be diabetic. While there isn’t necessarily a direct link between tobacco and diabetes, people who smoke usually have less healthy lifestyles than non-smokers. That’s not always the case, of course. There are even athletes who occasionally smoke a cigarette. But most people who smoke, especially those who smoke heavily, lead lives burdened by other unhealthy habits. This can include drinking too much, overeating, not getting adequate rest, and working jobs that are stressful or hard on the body. For that reason, smoking may help reduce diabetes risk. When people quit smoking, it’s often as part of a lifestyle change that will help them be healthier and feel better about themselves overall. This can give them the incentive they need to lose weight, get more exercise, get better sleep, and even see their doctor more frequently. With that in mind, it’s important to note that quitting tobacco, in and of itself, isn’t necessarily proven to reduce the risk of diabetes. But anything that makes you healthier overall can reduce your chance Continue reading >>

“you Can't Eat Sugar” And Other Diabetes Myths

“you Can't Eat Sugar” And Other Diabetes Myths

A diabetes diagnosis means you have a lot to learn about the disease—including sifting fact from fiction. Find the truths behind some common diabetes myths here. If you assume a diabetes diagnosis means you're fated to a life full of bland foods, think again. The truth is that plenty of tasty foods have a place in your diet. Diabetes is a complicated, often misunderstood disease. If you have it or know someone who does, there's a lot for you to learn—including sifting fact from fiction. Below are the truths behind some common diabetes myths. Myth: People with diabetes can't eat sugar and require special "diabetic" foods. Fact: If your blood glucose levels are under control, some sugar can be part of your diet. In fact, a diabetes diet is no different than a healthy diet. Just like people without diabetes, you should limit foods high in saturated fat, trans fat, sodium and added sugar. Your diet should be rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low-fat and nonfat dairy and lean proteins. And you probably don't need to buy special "diabetic" foods. Consider the cost and convenience of these products when making your decision. Work with a certified diabetes educator or a registered dietician to create a nutrition plan that fits your needs. Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Fact: Diabetes is not caused by eating sugar. Refined sugar that's found in foods is completely different than "blood sugar." Type 1 diabetes occurs when people have little or no insulin in their body. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body cannot properly use the insulin it makes. In time, it is no longer able to make enough insulin to keep up. Insulin is responsible for moving glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. If you don't have insulin, the glucose stays in the bloodstream. Thi Continue reading >>

20 Diabetes Symptoms You Can't Afford To Ignore

20 Diabetes Symptoms You Can't Afford To Ignore

Slide 1 of 21: Stay healthy by keeping a close eye on these possible signs of diabetes. Whether triggered by genetics or lifestyle, diabetes rates are skyrocketing around the world, with more than 29 million people living with the disease in the United States alone. What’s even scarier than those numbers is how many people don’t know they have it.While many people imagine that diabetes is a disease that boldly announces itself, that’s far from the case. In fact, symptoms can be so mild, or even mimic other diseases to the point that those who actually have the disease don’t know it for years. However, even if your diabetes symptoms aren’t troubling you, that doesn’t mean they’re not taking their toll on your body. Uncontrolled diabetes can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, blindness, and can increase your chances of requiring amputations. Fortunately, you can lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by adding the 20 Foods That Fight Diabetes to your menu and improve your chances of finding the disease while it’s still manageable by discovering the 20 Diabetes Symptoms You Can't Afford to Ignore! Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

Myth: Sugar Causes Diabetes

Myth: Sugar Causes Diabetes

We all know the stereotype – if you’ve got diabetes, you must have eaten too much sugar. But, with this sweet ingredient found in so much of our food – and, recently, so many of our newspapers – what’s the truth about sugar? And how does it affect diabetes? What is sugar? Sugar is found naturally in fruit, vegetables and dairy foods. It’s also added to food and drink by food manufacturers, or by ourselves at home. The debate about sugar and health is mainly around the ‘added sugars’. This includes: table sugar that we add to our hot drinks or breakfast cereal caster sugar, used in baking sugars hidden in sauces, ready meals, cakes and drinks. Does sugar cause diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the insulin producing cells in your pancreas are destroyed by your immune system. No amount of sugar in your diet – or anything in your lifestyle – has caused or can cause you to get Type 1 diabetes. With Type 2 diabetes, though we know sugar doesn’t directly causes Type 2 diabetes, you are more likely to get it if you are overweight. You gain weight when you take in more calories than your body needs, and sugary foods and drinks contain a lot of calories. And it's important to add that fatty foods and drinks are playing a part in our nation's expanding waistline. So you can see if too much sugar is making you put on weight, then you are increasing your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes. But Type 2 diabetes is complex, and sugar is unlikely to be the only reason the condition develops. If I have diabetes, can I eat sugar? Having diabetes doesn’t mean you have to cut sugar out of your diet completely. We all enjoy eating sugary foods occasionally, and there’s no problem including them as a treat Continue reading >>

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

If I Have Diabetes, Will I Have To Stop Eating Sugar?

What is that saying? Everything is good but only in moderation? Well this rings true when it comes to eating sugar with diabetes too. You probably already know that eating a lot of sugar is not great for your body. The problem is that sugar comes in a natural form and in an added form, so sometimes you have no idea that you are consuming it. Also, it is in many foods that you don’t even think to consider. Foods that you think are healthy, such as tomato sauce and protein bars, are packed full of sugar. This article breaks down the facts about eating sugar with diabetes and how you can make the best choices for your body in order to effectively manage your diabetes. How does sugar impact the blood sugar levels? Normally, when you eat something that contains sugar, your pancreas releases insulin. This insulin partners up with the sugar molecules and together they enter into the cells and provide energy to your body. When you have diabetes, your body either isn’t making enough insulin anymore, or your body is resistant to the insulin that you are creating. This prevents the sugar from being used by your cells and it just hangs out in your bloodstream causing high blood sugar levels. Having sugar in your bloodstream can lead to many problems and is dangerous for your health. Sugar, which is also known as carbohydrates or glucose, is found naturally in many different foods such as dairy, fruits, and starchy vegetables. It is also added to many foods like pastas, grains, baked goods, processed foods, and beverages. Since liquids are digested faster, they increase your blood sugar faster than solids do. More about what contains sugar is found later in this article. The myth about sugar and diabetes There are many myths about diabetes in general. One of the biggest ones is Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet, exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; with type 2 diabetes, your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally.) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. More than 4 million people with diabetes have some degree of retinopathy, or dam Continue reading >>

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Give You Diabetes? I Actually Do Work Out And Eat Healthy For The Most Part But I'm Wondering Because I Eat A Lot Of Sugar

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Give You Diabetes? I Actually Do Work Out And Eat Healthy For The Most Part But I'm Wondering Because I Eat A Lot Of Sugar

Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. False: Type 1 diabetes happens when the cells in the pancreas(pronounced: PAN-kree-us) that make insulin (pronounced: IN-suh-lin) are destroyed. This process isn't related to how much sugar a person eats. With type 2 diabetes, the body can't respond to insulin normally. The tendency to get type 2 diabetes is mostly inherited. That means it's linked to the genes people get from their parents. Still, eating too much sugar (or foods with sugar, like candy or regular soda) can cause weight gain, and weight gain can increase a person's risk for developing the disease. Some newer research studies suggest that eating more sugar might increase a person's risk for getting type 2 diabetes, even without extra weight gain. This hasn't been completely proven to be true yet. People with diabetes can never eat sweets. False: You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! People with diabetes need to control the total amount of carbohydrates (pronounced: kar-bo-HI-drates) in their diet, and sugary treats count as carbs. But this doesn't mean that they can't have any sweets. It just means that they should put the brakes on eating too many sweets and other high-calorie foods that are low in nutrients (like vitamins and minerals we all need). Eating too many of these foods also can make it less likely you'll want to eat healthier foods. People can outgrow diabetes. False: People don't grow out of their diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure for diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes may find it easier to control blood sugar levels if they make healthy changes to their lives, like eating Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

The Sugar Myths

The Sugar Myths

“To manage diabetes, just cut out the sugar.” “This candy’s okay, it’s sugar-free” “Too much sugar causes diabetes.” Do you believe any of these sugar myths? If so, you’re not alone. They come up over and over again in the Diabetes Daily community. Far too many learn the truth the hard way. So let’s set the records straight. Myth: To manage diabetes, just cut out the sugar. This myth is downright dangerous. Many people get diagnosed with diabetes, cut out the sugar, and struggle to understand why they have sky high blood sugars. They think, “I skipped the sugary foods and just ate a big baked potato. What went wrong?!” The body converts all carbohydrates into simple sugars with the exception of some amount of dietary fiber. So that sugar-free baked potato makes its way into blood sugar just a surely as a piece of candy will. Of course, not all carbohydrates are equal. Pure sugar will raise your blood sugars much more quickly than fibrous carbohydrates from vegetables. Myth: This candy’s okay, it’s sugar-free! This is wrong on a few levels. Many sugar-free foods are actually loaded with carbohydrates. In some cases, a sugar-free food will have more carbohydrates than a comparable product made with sugar! It’s vital to read the actual package to see how many carbohydrates a product contains. The second issue is that many sugar-free candies are full of artificial sweeteners like malitol, sorbitol, and others ending in “-ol”. These compounds are engineered to taste sweet but pass through the stomach undigested. This can nausea or diarrhea in some people, especially in larger quantities. This doesn’t mean that sugar-free foods are always bad. But it’s important to read the nutritional labels to make sure that you’re eating what you thi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

A A A Topic Overview What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes happens when your body can't use insulin the right way or when the pancreas can't make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle, fat, and liver cells. Without insulin, this sugar can't get into your cells to do its work. It stays in your blood instead. Your blood sugar level then gets too high. High blood sugar can harm many parts of the body, such as the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. It can also increase your risk for other health problems (complications). Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, so that over time the body can't produce insulin at all. In type 2 diabetes, the body still makes some insulin, but it can't use it the right way. What causes type 2 diabetes? You can get type 2 diabetes if: Your body doesn't respond as it should to insulin. This makes it hard for your cells to get sugar from the blood for energy. This is called insulin resistance. Your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. If you are overweight, get little or no exercise, or have type 2 diabetes in your family, you are more likely to have problems with the way insulin works in your body. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including staying at a healthy weight, making healthy food choices, and getting regular exercise. What are the symptoms? Some people don't have symptoms, especially when diabetes is diagnosed early. This is because the blood sugar level may rise so slowly that a person may not know that anything is wrong. The most common symptoms of high blood sugar include: Fee Continue reading >>

Diabetes Q&a: When You Can't Feel Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Q&a: When You Can't Feel Low Blood Sugar

Q: I have been living with type 1 diabetes for over 20 years. Lately I’ve been experiencing more episodes of low blood sugar that seem to come without warning. What can I do if I can no longer tell when my blood sugar is getting low? A: If you’ve been living with type 1 diabetes for a while and control has become more difficult for you, it’s possible that you may not be able to feel the symptoms of low blood sugar as easily as you used to. Those symptoms include sweating, shaking, dizziness, and hunger. Often, the threshold blood sugar level at which someone would ordinarily feel those symptoms is lowered over time, and rather than coming on gradually, the symptoms may happen suddenly. The reason for this is “autonomic neuropathy." Just as uncontrolled blood sugar can take a toll on the sensory nerves, leading to peripheral neuropathy, which causes pain, tingling, and numbness in the hands and feet, it can also cause damage to autonomic nerves. These are nerves that manage involuntary body functions, such as digestion, and in this case, the communication between the heart, blood pressure, and brain. If low blood sugar comes on suddenly, it can increase the risk of falling and fracturing a bone; it can also put a strain on the heart. It’s possible to screen for autonomic neuropathy by noninvasive tests in a medical office. The key to preventing diabetic autonomic neuropathy is to maintain good blood sugar control. Sometimes a supplement called alpha-lipoic acid can help control the symptoms. Of course, before starting a supplement, you should be sure to talk to your doctor about whether it’s appropriate for you. The good news is that continuous glucose monitoring, insulin pump mechanisms, and easier means of testing blood sugar can help. The bottom line is th Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Many overweight adults can't seem to lose weight no matter what they try. The problem may not lie in their calorie counts but their very cells: Increasing numbers of Americans, leading nutritionists say, are insulin-resistant. That is, their bodies no longer properly use the hormone insulin to process the food that's eaten. Net result: The body hangs on tight to the fat that's already there. A stubborn inability to lose weight because of insulin resistance is a complicated but common problem, says integrative nutritionist Beth Reardon, director of nutrition for Duke Integrative Medicine, part of the Duke University Health System. If you're fighting the scale, she adds, you may be among the 79 million American adults who have or are heading toward prediabetes, a syndrome of insulin-related challenges that usually leads to diabetes unless health changes are made. In 2010, 1.9 million new cases of full-blown diabetes were diagnosed, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Indeed, diabetes and obesity are so related that some health experts have coined the descriptor diabesity. Why You May Not Be Losing Weight When we eat, the food is broken down into glucose (blood sugar), the body's main energy source. As blood flows through the pancreas, this organ detects the high levels of glucose and knows to release insulin, a hormone that it produces in order to allow the cells throughout the body to use the glucose. The cells have insulin receptors that allow glucose to enter. Then the cell either uses the glucose to make energy right away or stores it as a future energy source. For some people, though, this system has gone haywire. The cells' insulin receptors have pretty much stopped acknowledging the insulin, which means the cells don't get the glucose. Instead, the glucos Continue reading >>

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