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Diabetes Where To Prick Finger

How To Test Your Blood Glucose

How To Test Your Blood Glucose

Tweet Testing your blood glucose with a blood glucose meter allows you manage your diabetes. Watch a video guide on how to test your blood glucose (sugar) levels. For people new to diabetes, this guide to testing your blood glucose levels should get you started. Testing your blood sugar levels helps you to make informed decisions about your diet, activity and, if self-adjusting insulin, dosing requirements. Bear in mind that not all blood glucose meters are the same, so you may need to slightly the modify the method here. What do I need to test my blood sugar? In order to test your blood sugar levels, you will need: a blood glucose meter a test strip and a lancing device Some blood glucose meters may come with test strips and/or lancing devices. If in doubt, ask your healthcare professional. How to test your blood glucose Prepare your kit ready for testing. This should include: your meter, a test strip to hand (it may be advisable to have a spare strip to hand too), the finger pricker (lancing device), cotton wool (optional) and a monitoring diary to record the results Ensure that the finger pricking device has been loaded with a new lancet. Wash and dry your hands - to ensure that the result is not influenced by any sugars that may be present on your fingers A fuller drop of blood will be obtained if your fingers are warm, so it’s worth warming your hands up if you can. Be careful not to overheat your fingers so as not to hurt yourself. Put a test strip into your meter Prick your finger with the lancing device at the sides of the finger as there are less nerve ending here than at the tips or the ‘pads’. Recommended finger: the World Health Organisation recommends the middle or ring fingers are used for blood glucose tests (second and third fingers). You may want Continue reading >>

Fda Oks Device With No Finger-prick For Diabetes

Fda Oks Device With No Finger-prick For Diabetes

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The first fingerstick-free blood sugar monitoring system for adults with diabetes has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System features a small sensor wire that's placed below the skin's surface and continuously monitors blood sugar (glucose) levels. People with diabetes can wave a mobile reader above the sensor wire to check their glucose levels. The system is approved for use in people with diabetes aged 18 and older. After a 12-hour start-up period, it can be worn for up to 10 days, the FDA said. "This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes -- with a wave of the mobile reader," Donald St. Pierre said in an FDA news release. He is deputy director of new product evaluation in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Approval of the system, made by Abbott Diabetes Care, was based on a clinical trial of diabetes patients aged 18 and older. The system does not provide real-time alerts on its own, the FDA noted. For example, it cannot warn patients about low blood glucose levels while they're sleeping. Potential risks associated with the system include low or high blood sugar if data it provides is inaccurate and used to make treatment decisions, the FDA said. Some patients may also have mild skin irritation around the area where the sensor wire is inserted. More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with diabetes either don't make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin pr Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar Testing Important?

Why Is Blood Sugar Testing Important?

Measuring blood sugar (glucose) levels at home has become a cornerstone of diabetes care. Measuring blood sugar regularly can: Help you know if your blood sugar is within your target range. Staying in a healthy range can help prevent or delay the long-term complications of high blood sugar, such as heart, kidney, eye, nerve, and circulation problems Help you know if your blood sugar is too low or too high and treatment is needed Help you know how much and which type of medicine to use Prevent low blood sugar at night Help you manage illness at home Let you know if you need to do a ketone test (if you have type 1 diabetes) Help you understand the effects of certain foods, exercise, and stress on your blood sugar Help your healthcare provider know if changes in your treatment are needed What supplies are needed? Doing a blood test requires: Finger-pricking (lancing) device: A finger-pricking device (called a lancet) is used to get a drop of blood for the test. The lancet can often be set at different depths for different people. Adjustable lancets are good for young children and tender skin and for when you do not need the lancet to go deep. Remember to change the lancet every day. A sharp and clean lancet helps prevent injury and infection. Blood glucose meter (glucometer): Most people use blood glucose meters to test blood sugar. Not all meters measure in the same way, so the results from different meters are not always the same. It doesn't matter which type of meter you choose as long as you always use the same meter. Bring the meter to each clinic visit. Your healthcare provider can get a record of the test results from the meter. Some features to look for in a meter include: Accuracy: Make sure the meter is accurate in the environment where you live, for example, in Continue reading >>

Ten Tips To Help Reduce The Pain Of Finger Pricks

Ten Tips To Help Reduce The Pain Of Finger Pricks

Testing regularly can get painful pretty quickly. It can also lead to developing calloused fingers and scar tissue. In order for us to avoid some of these problems, we should consider the following tips: Use soap and water, instead of alcohol, whenever possible: Soap and water is just as effective at reducing the risk for infection as alcohol without the drying effects of alcohol on skin, especially during the coming winter months. Dry skin is more sensitive, and more prone to infection. Always wash your hands. Test on the sides of your fingers, not on the pads: The pads of our fingers have the most nerve endings in order to better feel and touch – they are therefore going to hurt the most. The sides of our fingers have less nerve endings, and will produce just as accurate blood glucose readings, with less pain. Rotate fingers regularly: Many folks stick to a few favorite fingers to test. This might seem convenient but it ends up as a painful choice because it lessens the time a testing site has to heal. Testing on the same fingers over and over increases the risk for infection, keeps them inflamed, and increases callus formation and scar tissue. Test on a different finger every day, and use all 10 fingers. Make a hand map: Draw an outline of your hand on a piece of paper, and keep track of where you had a finger prick by coloring dots on the respective fingers. This way, it’ll be easier to remember which fingers to rotate, and allow time for healing. Consider alternative site testing: Many glucose meters now allow for alternative site testing – where you can test on your palm or forearm. While these sites are not ideal for when we suspect we have hypoglycemia, they make a fine alternative for every day testing and give our fingers a break. Lower the setting on yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes System Continuously Checks Glucose Without A Finger Prick

Diabetes System Continuously Checks Glucose Without A Finger Prick

Thanks to a system developed by Dexcom, a developer of technology for diabetes, diabetics won’t need to prick their fingers anymore to check their glucose levels. The Dexcom G5 is a glucose monitoring system that uses a sensor, a transmitter, and the user’s smartphone to continuously monitor the user’s glucose levels. “The Dexcom G5 Mobile system is the only continuous glucose monitor that the FDA has approved to replace finger stick blood glucose measurements when making diabetes treatment decisions,” says Jake Leach, senior vice president of research and development at Dexcom. A hair-like, stainless steel needle is inserted into the abdomen and releases the sensor, a flexible, metal wire with proprietary embedded membranes. After insertion, the needle is removed while the sensor is left behind. “These membranes are highly biocompatible and include glucose oxidase enzyme technology, which allows the sensor to accurately measure glucose” Leach says. "It undergoes testing to ensure biocompatibility." The coding also manages the amount of glucose that goes to the sensor enzyme, allowing consistency with the amount of glucose being transported. The sensor is connected to a thin, patch-like transmitter with two electrodes that use a 12-amp signal. As soon as the transmitter snaps with the sensor, it begins to function. The sensor comes out when the patch is removed. The transmitter is similar to a shell, designed with a polymer resin using a custom molding process. It was designed without a seal so it cannot be opened, which keeps it waterproof. Since the transmitter is not disposable, the batteries, two silver oxide coin cells, cannot be replaced. The transmitter, which runs on low power to ensure only its frequency is picked up, should be replaced after thre Continue reading >>

Glucose Monitoring System Eliminates Need For Finger Pricks

Glucose Monitoring System Eliminates Need For Finger Pricks

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The FreeStyle Flash Glucose Monitoring System has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, making it the first sanctioned device to monitor blood sugar in adult diabetics without the need for a finger prick. "This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes," said Donald St. Pierre, acting director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health and deputy director of new product evaluation in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. The system uses a small sensor implanted below the skin and a mobile reader to continuously monitor blood sugar, the agency said in a news release. People with diabetes must monitor their blood glucose levels frequently, often multiple times per day. Typically, they use a fingerstick sample to decide whether to administer the pancreatic hormone insulin. The new system eliminates the need to take this blood sample, which may be painful, the agency said. More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with type 2 cannot use insulin properly, triggering a buildup of blood sugar. This can lead to heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and amputation of the legs, feet or toes, the FDA said. The new device does not produce any type of alarm or alert if blood sugar levels are inappropriate, the agency noted. The system is produced by Abbott Diabetes Care, based in Alameda, Calif. -- Scott Roberts Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

New Technology Lets Diabetics Skip Multiple Finger Pricks

New Technology Lets Diabetics Skip Multiple Finger Pricks

One of the biggest complaints for diabetics is that they hate having to prick their fingers multiple times to test sugar levels throughout the day. But now, there’s new technology that’s changing that. The Food and Drug Administration A has approved the Dexcom G5 continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM). Instead of multiple finger pricks to track your blood sugar levels, you will only need two per day. Here’s how the Dexcom G5 works: A sensor is attached to a transmitter, which is placed under your skin on the abdomen. The device lasts for about a week and then is removed and replaced. Glucose data is sent via Bluetooth to a smartphone app to update your insulin levels for up to 12 hours. Users can get up to 288 readings per day. The system is available now and is covered by many insurance companies. For more information, go to Dexcom.com. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Glucose Testing Of Little Value To Some Patients

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Glucose Testing Of Little Value To Some Patients

Many patients with type 2 diabetes consider finger-prick blood tests key for keeping blood glucose levels under control. But according to a new study, they are unlikely to be beneficial for patients who are not receiving insulin therapy. Researchers found that self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for 1 year failed to improve blood glucose control or health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with type 2 diabetes who were not treated with insulin. Senior study author Dr. Katrina Donahue, of the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and colleagues believe that their findings raise questions about the value of SMBG for many patients with type 2 diabetes. "Of course, patients and providers have to consider each unique situation as they determine whether home blood glucose monitoring is appropriate," says Dr. Donahue. "But the study's null results suggest that self-monitoring of blood glucose in non-insulin treated type 2 diabetes has limited utility. For the majority, the costs may outweigh the benefits." The team's findings were recently reported in JAMA Internal Medicine. Type 2 diabetes and blood glucose control According to the American Diabetes Association, around 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, accounting for around 90 to 95 percent of all cases. In type 2 diabetes, the body is unable to effectively use insulin, which is a hormone that helps to regulate blood glucose levels. As a result, glucose accumulates in the blood. Left untreated, high blood glucose levels can lead to severe complications, including kidney disease, stroke, and nerve damage. While some patients with type 2 diabetes require insulin therapy, the majority of patients are able to manage their Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Fda Oks Continuous Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks (update)

Fda Oks Continuous Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks (update)

U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn't need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. But most don't do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. "We're able to lower blood sugar safely" with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott's device was approved for adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company, based near Chicago, did not disclose the price of the reader or the sensors. Abbott's system can't be used with an insulin pump, a device worn against the skin th Continue reading >>

Are There Alternatives To Finger Pricking For People With Diabetes?

Are There Alternatives To Finger Pricking For People With Diabetes?

Many diabetes patients find that drawing blood for glucose testing from arms and other places hurts less than the traditional finger-prick. The results are not always comparable, however. Alternate-site testing allows you to draw blood from areas such as the palm, arm and thigh; only the fingertips and palm give a current blood glucose result. If you take blood from the arm or thigh, it tells you what your blood sugar was 20 to 35 minutes ago. You should always rub the arm and thigh before testing to bring fresh blood to the skin surface. An alternate-site reading is fine if you haven’t eaten for the past four hours or so and when you wake up, because most likely the blood sugar is stable. But results obtained from the arm or thigh are not helpful if you need to know what your blood sugar is right now and you are testing at a time when the blood sugar level is changing, such as an hour or two after a meal. An alternate-site test can give deceptively comforting results at a time when your blood sugar actually is dangerously low. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration gives these guidelines: People with hypoglycemia unawareness (your body gives no warning when your blood sugar is low) should never use alternate-site testing. For others, don’t use alternate sites when you have just taken insulin, anytime during or after exercise, when you are ill, when you just feel “low,” when you are about to drive or whenever your day is not routine, such as having to eat at an unusual time. Alternate-site testing can provide a break from the finger-prick routine, but it needs to be used with care. Videos Questions Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

One of the main aims of diabetes treatment is to keep blood glucose levels within a specified target range. The key is balancing your food with your activity, lifestyle and diabetes medicines. Blood glucose monitoring can help you understand the link between blood glucose, food, exercise and insulin. Over time your readings will provide you and your health professionals with the information required to determine the best management strategy for your diabetes. Maintaining good blood glucose control is your best defence to reduce the chances of developing complications from diabetes. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to check your blood glucose levels as often as you need to or as recommended by your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. To test blood glucose levels, you need: A blood glucose meter A lancet device with lancets Test strips. Blood glucose meters are usually sold as kits giving you all the equipment you need to start. There are many different types, offering different features and at different prices to meet individual needs. Most of these are available from Diabetes Australia in your state or territory, pharmacies and some diabetes centres. Your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator can help you choose the meter that’s best for you, and your Credentialled Diabetes Educator or pharmacist can show you how to use your meter to get accurate results. To test your blood glucose levels, you prick your finger with the lancet and add a small drop of blood onto a testing strip. This strip is then inserted into the meter, which reads the strip and displays a number – your blood glucose level. When and how often you should test your blood glucose levels varies depending on each individual, the type of diabetes and the tablets and/or insulin being us Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood sugar testing is an essential part of managing and controlling diabetes. Knowing your blood sugar level quickly can help alert you to when your level has fallen or risen outside the target range. In some cases, this will help prevent an emergency situation. You’ll also be able to record and track your blood glucose readings over time. This will show you how exercise, food, and medicine affect your levels. Conveniently enough, testing your blood glucose level can be done just about anywhere and at any time. In as little as a minute or two, you can test your blood and have a reading using an at-home blood sugar meter or blood glucose monitor. Learn more: Choosing a glucose meter » Whether you test several times a day or only once, following a testing routine will help you prevent infection, return true results, and better monitor your blood sugar. Here’s a step-by-step routine you can follow: Wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Then dry them well with a clean towel. If you use an alcohol swab, be sure to let the area dry completely before testing. Prepare a clean lancet device by inserting a clean needle. This spring-loaded device that holds the needle is what you will use to prick the end of your finger. Remove one test strip from your bottle or box of strips. Be sure to close the bottle or box completely to avoid contaminating the other strips with dirt or moisture. All modern meters now have you insert the strip into the meter before you collect blood, so you can add the blood sample to the strip when it is in the meter. With some older meters, you put the blood on the strip first, and then put the strip in the meter. Stick the side of your fingertip with the lancet. Some blood sugar machines allow for testing from different sites on your body, such as t Continue reading >>

Can I Avoid Black Dots From Finger Pricks?

Can I Avoid Black Dots From Finger Pricks?

Q: I'm testing my blood sugars more often, and now I have lots of little black dots on my fingers from the finger pricks. They're not really painful, but is there a way to avoid them? A: First of all, you deserve a lot of credit for the extra attention you've been paying to your diabetes self-management. Kudos! To avoid overstressing your fingers, check your lancing device -- are you using a deep setting? A deep lance will take longer to heal (the black dots are tiny scabs). Try using a lighter setting, but prepare your finger first so you get a good drop of blood. Some helpful tips include washing your hands in warm water, vigorously shaking your hands to get blood to the tips, and squeezing (or milking) the fingertip before lancing. Make sure your fingers are warm. Also consider the gauge of the lancet. Try using a 33-gauge ultrafine lancet, the thinnest available. This should cause less damage to the tissues in your fingers. Frequent lancing can lead to sore fingertips. Consider applying tea tree oil to your fingertips twice a day. The terpenoids in oil from the Australian tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) have antiseptic properties that can help your skin heal. The oil is sold over-the-counter. After using tea tree oil, avoid rubbing your eyes. Virginia Zamudio Lange, R.N., M.S.N., CDE, is a registered nurse, certified diabetes educator, and a past president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Avoid Finger Pricks With New App From Abbott, Silicon Valley Partner

Diabetics Can Avoid Finger Pricks With New App From Abbott, Silicon Valley Partner

(Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune) When Jeffrey Brewer's son was 15, the boy nearly lost his life because he took too much insulin. The diabetic teen took insulin to eat a large bag of chips late at night. But about 20 minutes later, he forgot about that first dose and took another. He spent two days in the hospital, his father said. "It was only by a miracle that my wife woke up at 4 a.m. and checked on him," said Brewer, president and CEO of Bigfoot Biomedical. "He would have been dead by 7 a.m." Now, Bigfoot Biomedical and north suburban-based Abbott Laboratories hope to help prevent such problems — and make life easier for millions of people with diabetes — with a new partnership announced Thursday. The partnership aims to combine several technologies to make it easier for diabetics to monitor their glucose levels and figure out how much insulin to take throughout the day. All people with Type 1 diabetes and nearly one-third of those with Type 2 diabetes must inject insulin to manage their glucose levels, according to Abbott and Bigfoot. Abbott already sells, in more than 35 countries outside the U.S., a small sensor that can be worn on the back of the upper arm for 14 days to track blood glucose levels. The sensor, unlike other wearable sensors, does not require patients to prick their fingers for calibration. Patients can place a hand-held reader near the device to see their current glucose levels, trends, patterns and where those levels might be headed. The system, called the FreeStyle Libre, is under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for potential sale in the U.S., according to Abbott. Abbott on Thursday announced that it has entered into an agreement with Silicon Valley-based Bigfoot to combine the FreeStyle Libre with a system now being devel Continue reading >>

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