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Diabetes Where To Inject

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

back to Overview Tips & Tricks Type 1 It is what it is, right? When living with type 1 diabetes there's no getting around the jab of a needle. Whether it's from an insulin pen, a syringe or a pump infusion set, you have to do it. Ilka asked our team for tips on dealing with a fear of shots and needles, and here's what she found... For some, needles are no big deal. For others, each injection is a challenge to overcome – even after many years. The reasons are usually different, and no matter how necessary it is (we all know it, logically) who can criticize? Is there anything normal about stabbing yourself with a sharp metal object? I think not! We have a lot of diabetes experience here at mySugr, collectively more than 150 years under our belts. And who better to ask for tips and tricks for overcoming a fear of needles/needle phobia than a bunch of people living well with diabetes? 1. Injectors Clara: I didn’t do my own injections right away. The day where everything changed was when I watched another girl my age in the hospital do her own injection. I thought, “if she can do it, so can I!” But some time later I developed an “injection-crisis” again and used an injection device, which hides the needle completely, to help me get through it. 2. Build Confidence Marlis: I’ve been helping children with diabetes for a long time, and fear of needles is very common. It can really help if mom or dad offers to let the child inject them, or even put in a pump infusion set. When those little ones see that you trust them to poke you and that it doesn’t hurt when they put the needle in it builds a lot of confidence and trust. Another step is to watch mom or dad do an injection and see that it’s fine. I have often let the kids inject me and they were so incredibly pr Continue reading >>

Tips For Injecting Insulin

Tips For Injecting Insulin

Stomach: Stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. Thigh: Inject at least 4 inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least 4 inches down from the top of the leg. The best area on the leg is the top and outer area of the thigh. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. Arm: Inject into fatty tissue in the back of the arm between the shoulder and the elbow. Buttock: Inject into the hip or “wallet area” and not into the lower buttock area. When rotating sites within one injection area, keep injections about an inch (or two finger widths) apart. Do not inject into scar tissue or areas with broken vessels or varicose veins. Scar tissue may interfere with absorption. Massage or exercise that occurs immediately after the injection may speed up absorption because of the increased circulation to the injection site. If you plan on strenuous physical activity shortly after injecting insulin, don’t inject in an area affected by the exercise. For example, if you plan to play tennis, don’t inject into your racquet arm. If you plan to jog or run, don’t inject into your thighs. When injecting with an insulin pen, inject straight in and be sure to hold the pen in place for a few seconds after the insulin is delivered to ensure that no insulin leaks out. Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Injecting insulin at home is done subcutaneously, under the skin, but not into muscle or vein. See also Syringe and Insulin pen. It's best to pull up some loose skin into a tent[1][2], then insert the needle firmly, bevel side up[3][4] for comfort[5]. {C BD has animations with narrations to help you learn how to draw insulin properly[6]. One can select from drawing one insulin or combining two insulins in the same syringe. Selecting this and the style of syringe you use personalizes the demo for your needs. The presentation is very clear and unhurried. BD also has a slideshow which shows how to inject your dog[7] or cat[8]. Injecting any insulin at the same site repeatedly over time or blunting a needle with re-use[10] can cause a lipodystrophy: either lipoatrophy[11] or lipohypertrophy. Either makes absorption unreliable. But varying the injection site can cause variability in action profile, too. This page illustrates[12] illustrates the most common areas humans with diabetes inject insulin and explains how absorption differs in various areas of the human body. This is true for ALL insulins. The new shot area needn't be very far from where the last shot was given--the distance of the width of 2 fingers will do fine as a measure[13]. Most of us dealing with pet diabetes vary the side we give the injections in--right side mornings and left side evenings, for example. This is another help in avoiding giving shots in the same areas[14]. Many people give insulin shots in the scruff of the pet's neck, which is now considered to be a less than optimum choice. The neck area provides poor insulin Absorption, due to it not having many capillaries, veins. etc. (vascularization). Other sites suggested by Dr. Greco include the flank and armpit[15]. Intervet recommends giving injec Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

Is It Okay To Inject Insulin In Public?

Is It Okay To Inject Insulin In Public?

Last week, one of our members said that they were fed up injecting insulin in dirty public restrooms. We wondered how common this practice was. Are you comfortable injecting in public or do you seek out a private place like a restroom? We posed the question on the Diabetes Daily Facebook page. And over 300 of you responded… strongly! Here are the nine most popular answers: “Of course; it’s nothing to be ashamed of. We inject, we live :)” – Jessica Alcorn “Yes I do! However back in the day when I was a teenager I went to the restroom at a McDonald’s and injected my insulin and had some lady call the police and tell them I was “shooting up” heroin in the bathroom!!! Three armed cops came rushing into the bathroom and grabbed my purse!! I was so scared and embarrassed!! They later apologized, but I was done doing it in the bathroom! So now I do it in the open,but the pens make it easier!!” – Randee Fratto “Of course! Its definitely nothing to be ashamed of, be proud you are taking care of your condition!” -Leanne ‘Brizzle’ Davis “Have done for the past 30 odd yrs!! Why on earth wouldn’t you? You’re Diabetic, that’s all! Its not a contagious disease!!” – Annette Columbine “gave my 5 year old her insulin in public. and boy people would stare. i dont care. she didnt either. she thought it was funny cuz people would cringe when she got a shot. :D” – Mellodie Humbert “When I was using pens I didn’t give it a second thought – nor do I now that I’m on a pump. I was and am discreet about it… don’t stand on a table and scream ‘look at me,’ but I personally don’t feel the need to hide it, be ashamed of it, or make a special trip to the ladies’ to inject. In some respects, if the right people see me and ask questions Continue reading >>

Injecting

Injecting

Injections are often all that people think of when you mention diabetes. But if you're new to Type 1 diabetes, injecting yourself (or having someone else do it for you) can be quite easy. You can't get away from the need to inject, but these tips can make it a bit easier. There's no escaping the fact that injecting can be a bit uncomfortable, especially the first few because you may be tense and anxious. We can't guarantee that this will go away, but as you become more confident and relaxed, injecting will become easier. Where to inject Well, you have a choice of four main injection sites – your stomach, bum, arms or thighs. All these body parts have a wide skin area so you can inject in lots of different places within these sites. This is called 'rotating' your injection sites and is really important. If you keep injecting in the same place small lumps may build up under your skin. These will make injections less effective and you won't appreciate the lumps left behind. You might find your arms are a bit on the skinny side – most people's are when compared to, say, your legs. Talk to your nurse about whether it's OK for you to inject in your arms. When injecting just before you do some physical activity, avoid injecting the limb you are just about to use (for example, don't inject your thigh just before playing football). If you do inject the limb you are just about to use, this will speed up the action of insulin and make a hypo more likely. Heat can also speed up the action of your insulin after it has been injected, so be careful if it's a hot day. Other things, such as taking a hot bath or a massage, can have an effect too – so, if you are doing any of these things, you have to check your blood glucose levels more often. Your comments "I've been Type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

A 55-year-old man with type 1 diabetes shocked his doctors, after he revealed what looked like two bottom cheeks hanging below his navel. The patient from South Africa, had been told to inject his life-saving insulin jabs into two areas of his stomach to control his blood-sugar levels. However, he hadn't realised that he needed to rotate the injection site around different parts of his body because the hormone insulin encourages the build up of soft fatty swellings within the layers of the skin. The man went on to develop 'firm and pendulous' masses on his stomach - a condition known as lipohypertrophy. Mild cases are surprisingly common, however this patient had a severe case as he hadn't changed his injection sites for three decades. Dr Stan Landau, from the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Joannesburg, was part of the team who treated the patient. He told Mail Online: 'We are a group of five senior doctors with many years experience between us and have never seen such a case before. 'We felt we needed to publish the picture in a journal because it was such an extreme case.' Dr Landau said the patient had continued to inject himself in his stomach because he thought the lumps were normal in insulin users. 'He had seen others with similar, but smaller masses in the same location. Sadly the lumps, though painless, had never been inspected,' the expert said. Dr Landau added that although the lumps may shrink slightly the disfiguration would be permanent without plastic surgery. The patient was encouraged to rotate the injection-site and use a smaller needle. He was also given a different type of insulin. Unfortunately the team lost contact with the patient after he failed to return for follow-up appointments. Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, the te Continue reading >>

What Is The Easiest Way To Give A Diabetes Insulin Injection?

What Is The Easiest Way To Give A Diabetes Insulin Injection?

The way that you insert your syringe or pen needle into your skin in order to get a proper dosage of insulin is called your insulin injection technique. Your healthcare professional can help you to learn an injection technique that will make your insulin therapy as effective and successful as possible. Injecting at the proper depth is an important part of good injection technique. Most healthcare professionals recommend that insulin be injected in the subcutaneous fat, which is the layer of fat just below the skin. If you inject too deep, the insulin could go into muscle, where it's absorbed faster but might not last so long (and, it hurts more when you inject into muscle). If the injection isn't deep enough, the insulin goes into the skin, which affects the insulin's onset and duration of action. Most people pinch up a fold of skin and insert the needle at a 90° angle to the skin fold. To pinch your skin properly, follow these steps: Squeeze a couple of inches of skin between your thumb and two fingers, pulling the skin and fat away from the underlying muscle. (If you use a 4 or 5 millimeter mini pen needle to inject, you don't have to pinch up the skin when injecting at a 90° angle; with this shorter needle, you don't have to worry about injecting into muscle.) Insert the needle. Hold the pinch so the needle doesn't go into the muscle. Push the plunger (or button if you're using a pen) to inject the insulin. Release the grip on the skin fold. Remove the needle from the skin. Note that not everyone injects at a 90° angle. If you inject into an area of the body that has less fat, you may need to inject at less than a 45° angle, to avoid injecting into a muscle. The angle you should use to insert the syringe or pen needle into your body depends on your body type, the Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 1 Diabetes And Insulin

It’s necessary to take insulin when you have type 1 diabetes. Your body doesn’t produce the hormone insulin, and without that, your body can’t properly get the energy and fuel it needs from glucose. Because people with type 1 diabetes rely on insulin, it was formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes. To learn about how the hormone insulin works, we have an article that explains the role of insulin. As soon as you are (or your child is) diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you will be immersed in the world of insulin, and it may feel overwhelming at first. There are doses to calculate, different types of insulin to consider, and the pressure of needing to keep blood glucose in a normal range to prevent short- and long-term complications. Your diabetes treatment team is there to help you. They can walk you through the basics of insulin dosing, answer any questions, and help you figure out how to balance food, exercise, and insulin. You will learn to take care of your diabetes with your diabetes team. If you are a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, we also encourage you to visit our Patients' Guide to Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes. It's often comforting to hear stories about others who are also going through the same things you are. Jay Cutler, quarterback for the Chicago Bears, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008, and he is still getting used to regular blood sugar testing and insulin injections. To learn more about his journey with type 1 diabetes, read Jay Cutler's interview with EndocrineWeb. This article will provide basic details on insulin treatment. You can also visit our Patients' Guide to Insulin for more details. Types of Insulin With type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin on a daily basis, and there are several types of insulin you Continue reading >>

Tips For Comfortable Injections

Tips For Comfortable Injections

Tips Massage or stroke your pet before the injection. This calms them and prevents them from being surprised by a needle stick. An extra minute or two of petting and relaxing may be all your pet needs to prepare for an injection. Many people use a food reward during or just after injection time. Giving the injection while the pet is busy eating is very common. Putting a small treat in front of your pet can help keep them still for an injection. Some people give a treat right after the injection. The pet is well behaved during the injection because it knows a treat is coming. Maybe a big hug and praise is all your pet needs. Warm the insulin before injecting. Human diabetics say that injecting cold insulin causes discomfort, and this is probably true for pets too. Room temperature insulin makes for a more comfortable injection. After filling the syringe with the proper amount of insulin, hold the syringe between your fingers for a minute. Some people take the entire vial of insulin out of the refrigerator and let it sit until it is room temperature. I prefer warm only the amount that is used for each injection, returning the insulin vial to the refrigerator as soon as possible.. DO NOT USE HOT WATER, A MICROWAVE, OR ANYTHING ELSE TO WARM THE INSULIN. Use your hands or let the syringe (or vial) sit on the table-top for a few minutes. When injecting, push the needle quickly and firmly through the skin. Going through the skin is the most sensitive time. Once the needle is through the skin the animal doesn't feel much. Inject the insulin at a moderate rate. Not too fast, but not too slow. This takes a little practice and your pet will let you know if you are doing it right. No alcohol wipes. Most people do not clean the injection site with alcohol before an injection. Alcoho Continue reading >>

Giving Yourself Insulin Injections

Giving Yourself Insulin Injections

The thought of injecting insulin may make you feel anxious. However, with good training from your diabetes educator, doing it can be surprisingly comfortable. Your health care provider and diabetes educator will show you where insulin can be injected. The most common site for pregnant women is the abdomen. The needle poses no threat to your baby, which is well protected in your uterus far away from the needle. Do not use insulin that is lumpy, sticks to the bottle or looks discolored. Return it to your pharmacy for a new bottle. Measuring and injecting a single type of insulin Wash your hands. Roll the bottle of cloudy insulin between your hands and turn it upside down to mix. Remove the cover from the needle. Draw air into the syringe equal to your prescribed dose of _______ units. Put the needle into the top of the insulin bottle and shoot air in. Turn the bottle and the syringe upside down. Pull down and push up on the plunger two or three times - slowly - to get rid of air bubbles. Look carefully to make sure that all air bubbles are gone. Draw out your prescribed amount of insulin: _______ units _______ type. Pull the needle out of the bottle. Clean the skin at the injection site, if needed. Gently pinch skin and inject insulin. Your diabetes educator or doctor will advise you where to inject your insulin (usually the abdomen). Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Injecting Insulin Through Clothing In Diabetic People

Dangers Of Injecting Insulin Through Clothing In Diabetic People

Present recommendations for insulin injections in patients with diabetes are varied and at times controversial. One such recommendation is to inject insulin through the clothing provided the clothes and skin are reasonably clean.1 This practice allows the patient to administer the injection at an appropriate time in almost any place when outside home, with minimal disruption. There are some anecdotal reports2 of this being done successfully without any adverse reaction. However, any scientific evidence comes from a single short-term study1 where no major complication was noted over a period of 20 weeks. Neither the British3 nor the American4 diabetic authorities recommend this practice in their detailed instructions and advice for patients. Standard textbooks5 suggest that people with diabetes may be immunocompromised and prone to infection following minimal trauma.6 Abscesses resulting from insulin injection at injection sites are well-documented.6 Injecting through clothing may pose additional danger by carrying cloth fibres or contaminants from the clothes. A patient is currently being treated in our department whose history clearly demonstrates the risk. The patient is a 40-year-old woman who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was a teenager. Her physician at the time of diagnosis recommended injecting insulin through her clothing. Initially, she found this practice to be very convenient. She continued with this practice for about four years and discontinued only after the injection sites (her thighs) started to become painful and uncomfortable. She started to use other anatomical areas for the insulin injections directly through skin and had no significant problem for over 15 years. Her glycaemic control had been largely satisfactory over these years and s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

The young people we talked to tell us what it is like to inject insulin every day, the problems they've had and how they've coped with them. Where and how to inject Young people are taught by specialist diabetes nurses and doctors how and where to inject. Arms, legs and the stomach are all parts of the body recommended for injection. Most people said that their preferred place was the stomach. But they also said that it's important to vary the place where they inject, over a wide area. They said that injecting in the same place can cause lumps or other changes, called hyperlipotrophy, to develop under the skin. Your healthcare team can teach you how to recognise these changes. Injecting into the areas that have developed this problem is usually completely painless but the insulin may then be absorbed unevenly, which makes blood sugar much harder to control. Some young people who were small children when diagnosed said that they have grown up with doing daily injections and thought it was normal. Other children were scared of needles at first and their parents had to inject them, to begin with. Young people have different opinions as to whether insulin injections hurt or not. Some said that the needles they use are so thin that they don't feel it, but others said it depends on how relaxed and comfortable they are at the time of the injection. Several young people commented that it's much easier and painless to do the injections themselves because they know their own body. Most young people said that it is down to practice and that 'practice makes it perfect'. The people we talked to said that doing their own injections made them feel in control and gave them a feeling of independence. Getting used to injecting everyday It could take a long time to get used to injecting e Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

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