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Diabetes Venn Diagram

Type 1 Diabetes Vs. Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Vs. Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes affects over 29 million people in the United States, and 1 in 4 of those affected are unaware that they have diabetes.[1] Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in younger people and occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body cannot use the insulin it produces. This disease, frequently related to obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and genetics, is most often diagnosed in adults, but incidence rates are increasing among teens in America.[2][3] Comparison chart Type 1 Diabetes versus Type 2 Diabetes comparison chart Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Definition Beta cells in pancreas are being attacked by body's own cells and therefore can't produce insulin to take sugar out of the blood stream. Insulin is not produced. Diet related insulin release is so large and frequent that receptor cells have become less sensitive to the insulin. This insulin resistance results in less sugar being removed from the blood. Diagnosis Genetic, environmental and auto-immune factors, idiopathic Genetic, obesity (central adipose), physical inactivity, high/low birth weight, GDM, poor placental growth, metabolic syndrome Warning Signs Increased thirst & urination, constant hunger, weight loss, blurred vision and extreme tiredness, glycouria Feeling tired or ill, frequent urination (especially at night), unusual thirst, weight loss, blurred vision, frequent infections and slow wound healing, asymptomatic Commonly Afflicted Groups Children/teens Adults, elderly, certain ethnic groups Prone ethnic groups All more common in African American, Latino/Hispanic, Native American, Asian or Pacific Islander Bodily Effects Beleived to be triggered autoimmune destruction of the beta cells; autoimmune attack may occur following a viral infection such as mumps, rubell Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2

Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Understanding diabetes starts with knowing the different types of diabetes and their key differences. The two most common types are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin due to an overactive immune system. So people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults but can also appear in older adults. Type 2 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, your body prevents the insulin it does make from working right. Your body may make some insulin but not enough. Most people with diabetes—about 90% to 95%—have type 2. This kind of diabetes usually happens in people who are older, although even younger adults may be diagnosed with it. Type 2 diabetes also usually occurs in people who are overweight. In fact, about 8 out of 10 people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) Some women may develop diabetes during pregnancy, which is called gestational diabetes. Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes doesn't mean a woman had diabetes before or would continue to have diabetes after giving birth. A woman should follow her health care provider's advice closely during pregnancy. Continue reading >>

Type 1

Type 1

Type 1 Takes place when the pancreas does not produce insulin because the body attacked the beta cells Normally, appears before the age of 40 AKA Juvenile/Childhood Diabetes Type 1 diabetics have to inject themselves with insulin regularly to stay alive Not preventable 15% of diabetics have Type 1 Type 2 Takes place when the person's cells do not respond to the insulin, or there is too much insulin produced by the pancreas Can appear at any age AKA Gestational Diabetes Because the cells do not respond to the pancreas-made insulin, a Type 2 diabetic must also inject man-made insulin that the cells will respond to Now-a-days, most often occurs because of diet and lack of exercise (obesity), but also occurs through genetics 85% of diabetics have Type 2 diabetes Similarities Both types of diabetes generally have the same symptoms. Both types of diabetics must keep a close eye on their blood sugar levels. Both types of diabetics need to stay in close contact with their diabetic specialists in case their blood sugar levels get too high or too low. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Definition Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar (glucose) level. Hyperglycemia is defined as too high a blood sugar (glucose) level. Description As you regulate your blood glucose and keep your diabetes record, there are two problems that you need to be able to recognize and treat (with your personal physician’s advice): hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia, or an insulin reaction, can happen if you are taking insulin or oral medications. Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose. This reaction happens when there is not enough glucose in your blood. A hypoglycemic reaction usually comes on very suddenly. It often happens at the time when insulin action is at its peak, during or after strenuous exercise or when a meal is delayed. Most people learn to recognize their own symptoms to an insulin reaction. If you begin feeling any symptoms or think your blood glucose may be too low, the best way to be sure is to check your blood level using a blood glucose test strip. If your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dl, then you are probably having a hypoglycemic reaction. Hyperglycemia: Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, is the condition found in individuals with diabetes, either insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent. Causes The most common causes of hypoglycemia are: 1. too much insulin, 2. too much exercise, or 3. not enough food Hyperglycemia usually occurs slowly, over several hours or days. It may be caused by: 1. not taking enough insulin 2. illness (such as a cold or flu) 3. infection 4. eating too much 5. stress 6. certain medications Symptoms Symptoms that you may notice with hypoglycemia are: sweating weakness anxiety trembling fast heartbeat inability to think straight irritability grouchiness hunger headache sleepiness Signs and sympto Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Despite sharing a name, type 1 and type 2 diabetes are quite different. Understanding the key differences in type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes is critical for research into finding a way to cure, treat and prevent diabetes, but also for caring for someone with diabetes and managing your own diabetes. How these diseases begin, how they affect the body and how they are treated are all quite different. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is the result of the human immune system mistaking the body’s beta cells, which produce insulin, for foreign cells and causing their destruction. Insulin is a protein that allows the transport of sugar into cells to provide energy. When sugar can’t get from the blood into the cells, the cells have no access to the glucose they need and cannot function correctly. The composition of our blood also gets off balance, with high blood sugar levels leading to detrimental effects on other organs of the body. Injecting synthetic insulin solves this problem because it keeps blood glucose levels in the right range and helps glucose reach our cells. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Although type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1, the causes for it aren’t fully understood. What doctors and scientists do know is that excess weight, inactivity, age and genetic makeup contribute to development of the disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but the cells in the body cannot respond to it adequately so they cannot take up glucose. Later on, especially when treatment fails, type 2 diabetes is aggravated by exhausted beta cells, decreasing their insulin production resulting in further increases in blood sugar levels. Since beta cells aren’t killed off in type 2 diabetes, at least initially, blood sugar levels often become elevated Continue reading >>

The Venn Diagram Of Healing

The Venn Diagram Of Healing

If you have been reading my blog on liveinmagic.com, you know a little about my healing journey. I will give you a quick review, so you will know where I’m coming from. I am presently 59 years, diagnosed at 16 with type 1 diabetes. I have been using different healing modalities for at least 37 years. Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution saved my life in 1996, and stopped all diabetes complications. Entered the Raw Vegan Diet in 2003, after wreaking havoc with my blood sugars, skeletal system and overall well being, it exited in 2010, when I began a Locavore, quasi Weston A. Price inspired diet. This is when I started my Liveinmagic.com blog. Between 2007 and 2012 I had Aimee’s Livin’ Magic company that produced Raw Vegan Snacks and Chocolate. I have been a health researcher since the year I finished college, in 1976, and have tried every diet that came “down the Pike” with any promise of lowering my need for insulin injections. When I started back on low carbs as in Dr. Bernstein’s book, Diabetes Solution, in 2010, after nearly ruining my health, trying to heal on the Raw Vegan diet, I was hopeful that I would find a way to heal. Enter Weston A. Price: I read the tome by Weston A. Price, written in 1939, hoping that simply by incorporating his amazing ideas, I would heal by eating all local food from farmers in my area who were raising animals on the food they were meant to eat, Grass! Eating raw, grassfed dairy especially local butter, and making sure to get fermented foods, like Kimchee. See my blogs on making butter and kimchee.and I was able to get my blood sugars under better balance than I have ever had. A type 1 diabetic’s blood sugars are very tricky to balance, trickier than most people realize, and Dr. Bernstein had taught me the basics. Keep your Continue reading >>

Estimating Diabetes Prevalence In South Auckland: How Accurate Is A Method That Combines Lists Of Linked Health Datasets?

Estimating Diabetes Prevalence In South Auckland: How Accurate Is A Method That Combines Lists Of Linked Health Datasets?

Estimating diabetes prevalence in South Auckland: how accurate is a method that combines lists of linked health datasets? 17th December 2010, Volume 123 Number 1327 Simon Thornley, Roger Marshall, Gary Jackson, James Smith, Wing-Cheuk Chan, Craig Wright, Dudley Gentles, Rod Jackson With the global rise of obesity and Type 2 diabetes in the last 30 years in New Zealand and elsewhere, timely and accurate estimates of the burden of this disease are required to plan health interventions and assess their influence on disease prevalence.1In areas where prevalence of diabetes is thought to be high, reliable estimates are required. In New Zealand, the highest concentration of diabetes is likely to be in Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB), given the high proportion of Mori and Pacific peoples; and the high level of socioeconomic deprivation in this district health board (DHB) population. This administratively defined region encompasses most of South Auckland, and is one of 21 geographically defined DHBs in New Zealand, with a population of about 464,500. Accurate, cost-effective and timely measurement of diabetes prevalence in CMDHB would help determine the effect of prevention programmes by allowing time trends to be studied. Such information has been extrapolated from national health status surveys that allow regional estimates to be calculated, by assuming nationally aggregated ethnic specific rates of disease apply to a local population. Such methods are, however, limited in a number of ways. For example, health status surveys are potentially biased by high levels of non-response (e.g. the 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey had a non-response rate of 32% in adults2). People who do not respond to such surveys, generally, have poorer health than responders. Moreove Continue reading >>

Insulin Vs Glucagon

Insulin Vs Glucagon

Insulin and glucagon have both similarities and differences. Both are hormones secreted by the pancreas but they are made from different types of cells in the pancreas. Both help manage the blood glucose levels in the body but they have opposite effects. Both respond to blood glucose levels but they have opposite effects. Each of us has insulin and glucagon in our systems because it is a strict requirement that the blood sugar level in the body is kept in a narrow therapeutic range. You need both insulin and glucagon to respond to various levels of glucose in the bloodstream. While insulin responds and is secreted by the pancreas upon having high glucose levels in the bloodstream, glucagon responds and is secreted by the pancreas upon having low glucose levels in the bloodstream. This maintains homeostasis in the body and keeps the blood sugar stable at all times. Function of Insulin Insulin is a protein-based hormone that is secreted by the beta cells inside the pancreas whenever the pancreas senses that the blood sugar is too high. Low levels of insulin are constantly being secreted into the bloodstream by the pancreas, even when blood glucose levels are normal. After you eat a meal, the glucose from the food you eat is taken up by the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the level of glucose in the blood. When this happens, the beta cells get activated and more insulin is secreted to help decrease the glucose levels, primarily by helping the glucose enter the cells to be used as cellular fuel. When the glucose level in the blood decreases, insulin levels by the islet (beta) cells of the pancreas return to a baseline status. In response to the elevated insulin level, the various cells of the body bind to insulin and the insulin facilitates the transfer of glucose from t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Debate: Hba1c Or Glucose?

Diabetes Debate: Hba1c Or Glucose?

February 2014—If it were a boxing match, the debate over whether hemoglobin should be used to diagnose diabetes would place the odds-on favorite in the “Yes” corner. In the “No” corner would be the underdog. At least based on the mainstream consensus since 2010, HbA1c for diagnosis is well established as an alternative to measuring glucose. " At the July 2013 meeting of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, where opposing sides on this question squared off in a debate, a quick vote beforehand showed “Yes” with a 20-to-one edge. But the speakers came armed with provocative data on comparative benefits and drawbacks, and both sides scored solid points. Most of the debate centered on two questions: Which is more accurate, HbA1c or glucose? And with regard to diagnosing diabetes and predicting risk of complications, what are the most important things to measure anyway? “Even though we’ve been measuring glucose in blood for 100 years, the question that comes up is: How accurate is a glucose result?” said moderator David Sacks, MB, ChB, FRCPath, senior investigator with the National Institutes of Health, in introductory remarks before the debate. Not only is there the usual preanalytical and analytical variation, but there is also large biological variability among people and even within a single person, he pointed out. “That means for every one of you sitting here, if you are healthy, your fasting plasma glucose can have a coefficient of variation of up to 8.3 percent between today and tomorrow, even if everything’s the same.” HbA1c is not a perfect alternative, but since 1993, when the NGSP (formerly the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program) launched efforts to standardize HbA1c, there has been a huge improvement in the assay Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

News you can use about diabetes Living with diabetes is about so much more than well, diabetes. It's about the ups, like small daily accomplishments and achieving your goals, and the downs. It can be complicated, but it may help to keep in mind that you can find inspiration, information, and motivation here. In these featured articles, you'll discover ideas to take the pressure off and help you deal with everything from making travel easier to making dining out more enjoyable. Since stress can really take its toll on your blood sugar, you can read how to tackle that, too. More articles are added each month. So browse them all, get inspired, and check back in with us often. If you'd like, you can sign up for more TeamingUp to get regular updates. Continue reading >>

Comparative Genetic Analysis Of Type 1 Diabetes And Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Comparative Genetic Analysis Of Type 1 Diabetes And Inflammatory Bowel Disease

1. Introduction Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been fruitful in identifying common variants underlying many complex human diseases (McCarthy et al., 2008, Altshuler et al., 2008), with notable success especially in several autoimmune diseases (Lettre & Rioux 2008, Zhernakova et al., 2009). Hundreds of distinct genomic loci have been associated with various autoimmune diseases, including celiac disease (CeD), Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Besides individual studies, recent meta-analysis of GWAS has also enabled the identification of dozens of susceptibility loci for T1D (Cooper et al., 2008, Barrett et al., 2009, Bradfield et al., 2011), CD (Barrett et al., 2009, Franke et al., 2010), and UC (McGovern et al., 2010, Anderson et al., 2011), since single studies are typically underpowered. Additionally, comparisons of susceptibility loci between different autoimmune diseases have revealed important insights into their common genetic architecture. For example, interleukin 23 receptor (IL23R) has been consistently implicated in multiple related autoimmune disorders including CD, UC, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis, suggesting that it may be a common susceptibility factor for the major seronegative diseases (Cargill et al., 2007, Duerr et al., 2006, Tremelling et al., 2007). Another study compared shared genetic risk factors for T1D and CeD and reported multiple identical risk alleles (Smyth et al., 2008), suggesting that common biologic mechanisms may be etiologic features of both diseases. Several similar studies that examined known CD susceptibility loci in GWAS for UC identified previously unreported susceptibility loci shar Continue reading >>

Which Type Of Diabetes Develops Quickly When The Production Of Insulin Stops?

Which Type Of Diabetes Develops Quickly When The Production Of Insulin Stops?

Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Usually develops before the age of 20, with a peak at 12 years old. Usually appears after the age of 40. Pancreas stops making insulin. Pancreas makes reduced amounts of insulin, or the body does not respond normally to the insulin produced. Treatments include insulin injections, diet control and regular exercise. Treatments include diet control, medication and regular exercise. About 10% of diabetes cases. About 90% of cases. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Also called non-insulin dependent diabetes Symptoms: develop quickly. Tiredness, excessive urine production, weight loss, increased thirst and blurred vision. Symptoms: same as for type 1 but less severe and may go undetected for many years. What type of diabetes is this person more likely to develop? Male aged 52 who is over weight and takes little exercise. What type of diabetes is this person more likely to develop? Girl aged 9 who has a history of diabetes in her family. What type of diabetes is caused when the body's own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas? Which type of diabetes develops quickly when the production of insulin stops? In Type 1 Diabetes the main problem is the body ___________________. a. cannot produce insulin b. cannot use the insulin c. kills the insulin it has d. cannot absorb insulin _____ 8.In Type 2 Diabetes, the main problem is the body __________________. a. cannot make insulin b. cannot use insulin c. cannot produce glucagon d. cannot absorb glucagon Type 2 Diabetes is most commonly found in people who a. are young b. are overly thin c. exercise frequently d. regularly eat sugar-rich foods COMPARE AND CONTRAST TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 DIABETES VIA VENN DIAGRAM Directions: On the following Venn diagram, compar Continue reading >>

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

“Oh, you have diabetes? That’s where you can’t eat sugar and have to poke yourself with needles and stuff because you ate too much candy as a kid…right?” *sigh* Wrong. Most people have no clue what diabetes is let alone that there is more than one type of diabetes. Type 1, type 2, LADA, MODY, and gestational are just some classification examples of diabetes. All have a range of differences and similarities but the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. As type 1 and type 2 diabetics [should] know, there are a few major differences between the two conditions which, all too often, get confused and misconstrued by the public. Yet, there are also a few similarities that get overlooked even among people in the diabetic community. Take a look at these two major forms of diabetes and make sure you can not only distinguish the differences but also share the similarities. Similarities Symptoms The symptoms for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are identical in most ways. Both conditions involve three distinct symptoms prior to diagnosis: Polyuria – excessive urination often due to high blood sugar Polydipsia – excessive thirst Polyphagia – excessive hunger In type 2 diabetes, symptoms tend to be more gradual than type 1 but they both still share these symptoms along with the other usual byproducts of diabetes like high and low blood sugar, increased agitation, shaky/sweaty blood sugar reactions, as well as the more severe hypoglycemic events that can lead to seizures, coma, and death. Complications People often ask “so, do you have the bad kind of diabetes” and it kind of makes my ears bleed. There is no “good kind” of diabetes and anyone who thinks there is either doesn’t understand diabetes or is living in a warped world of “th Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

Although there are three main types of diabetes, there is also a stage before diabetes called pre-diabetes. Pre-diabetes, also known as Impaired glucose tolerance is a condition where your Blood sugar level elevates to a level higher than the normal range for most people, but is still low enough not to be considered diabetes. People who have pre-diabetes are at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life if they do not monitor their condition carefully. People who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes can help keep from progressing to a full blown diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes by watching their weight, exercising and eating the right foods. The first main type of diabetes is Type 1 diabetes, an Autoimmune disease where the pancreas produces very little insulin or no insulin at all. People who get Type 1 diabetes are usually under the age of 20, usually presenting itself when the person is a child or young adult. Some scientists believe that Type 1 diabetes is a genetic condition where the cells of the Pancreas are attacked and then stop functioning. Others feel the disease may be caused by a virus that prompt the immune system to begin attacking the pancreas. Because the pancreas cells that produce Insulin are destroyed, people who develop Type 1 diabetes will have the disease for life and will need treatment in the form of insulin shots or an insulin pump. In addition to insulin therapy, exercise and careful attention to diet is necessary to prevent fluctuations of blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes is normally found in people who are overweight as they get older. Although it is sometimes called adult onset diabetes, in some country, such as the United States, more children and young adults are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes because they are not getting enough acti Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 And 2 - Topic Overview

Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 And 2 - Topic Overview

In general, people with diabetes either have a total lack of insulin (type 1 diabetes) or they have too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively (type 2 diabetes). Type 1 diabetes (formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes), accounts for 5 to 10 out of 100 people who have diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, eventually eliminating insulin production from the body. Without insulin, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose), which they need to produce energy. Type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes) can develop at any age. It most commonly becomes apparent during adulthood. But type 2 diabetes in children is rising. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the vast majority of people who have diabetes-90 to 95 out of 100 people. In type 2 diabetes, the body isn't able to use insulin the right way. This is called insulin resistance. As type 2 diabetes gets worse, the pancreas may make less and less insulin. This is called insulin deficiency. How are these diseases different? Differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Symptoms usually start in childhood or young adulthood. People often seek medical help, because they are seriously ill from sudden symptoms of high blood sugar. The person may not have symptoms before diagnosis. Usually the disease is discovered in adulthood, but an increasing number of children are being diagnosed with the disease. Episodes of low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia) are common. There are no episodes of low blood sugar level, unless the person is taking insulin or certain diabetes medicines. It cannot be prevented. It can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including maintaining a healthy wei Continue reading >>

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