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Diabetes Vascular Dementia

Vascular Dementia: Symptoms, Prognosis, Types, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Vascular Dementia: Symptoms, Prognosis, Types, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Prognosis for People With Vascular Dementia Vascular dementia , also known asmulti-infarct dementia is the second most common cause of dementia in older people. Because it has a lower profile than Alzheimer's , many people don't suspect vascular dementia when forgetfulness becomes problematic. It's also difficult to diagnose so it's difficult to know exactly how many people suffer from vascular dementia. Current estimates attribute 15% to 20% of dementia cases in older adults to vascular dementia. Determining the root cause can help determine the best action plan. If it's vascular dementia, certain lifestyle changes can help prevent further damage. WebMD takes a look at vascular dementia, its causes, symptoms, and prognosis. Compared to Alzheimer's disease , which happens when the brain 's nerve cells break down, vascular dementia happens when part of the brain doesn't get enough blood carrying the oxygen and nutrients it needs. Though they happen in different ways, it is possible to have both vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease . Discouraging as this sounds, there is ample reason to control the risk factors that contribute to vascular dementia. Allowing the condition to run its course without intervention can make Alzheimer's disease worse. Vascular dementia occurs when vessels that supply blood to the brain become blocked or narrowed. Strokes take place when the supply of blood carrying oxygen to the brain is suddenly cut off. However, not all people with stroke will develop vascular dementia. Vascular dementia can occur over time as "silent" strokes pile up. Quite often, vascular dementia draws attention to itself only when the impact of so many strokes adds up to significant disability. Avoiding and controlling risk factors such as diabetes , high blood press Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Ups Vascular Dementia Risk In Women

Type 2 Diabetes Ups Vascular Dementia Risk In Women

Type 2 Diabetes Ups Vascular Dementia Risk in Women People with type 2 diabetes have about a 60% increased risk of dementia compared with those without diabetes, according to a new meta-analysis. The study also found that women with type 2 diabetes are at much higher risk of developing vascular dementia than men with diabetes. The analysis included data on over 2.3 million people and over 100,000 cases of dementia more than seven times the data in past reviews on the issue. "Diabetes increases the risk of developing dementia, but for a major subtype of dementia namely vascular dementia, not Alzheimer's disease the risk is higher in women with diabetes compared with men with diabetes," commented senior author Rachel Huxley, DPhil, head of the School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia. "These findings add to the evidence that diabetes confers a greater vascular hazard in women compared with men," she added, "Diabetes confers a greater risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and now vascular dementia in women compared with men." The study was published online December 17 in Diabetes Care, by Saion Chatterjee of Alfred Health, Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues. Dementia is a growing health problem. About 44 million people have dementia worldwide, with 7.7 million new cases diagnosed each year. Forecasts predict that the prevalence of dementia will double by 2030 and triple by 2050, according to background information in the article. The two most common forms of dementia include nonvascular dementia (mainly Alzheimer's disease) and vascular dementia. A past review found that people with diabetes had about a 70% increased risk of dementia, but it was limited by the fact that most of the documented dementia cases were in people of Asian background. It Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia

Vascular Dementia

Vascular dementia is a decline in thinking skills caused by conditions that block or reduce blood flow to the brain, depriving brain cells of vital oxygen and nutrients. About vascular dementia Related dementias share some common symptoms Vascular changes that start in brain areas that play a key role in storing and retrieving information may cause memory loss that looks very much like Alzheimer's disease. Inadequate blood flow can damage and eventually kill cells anywhere in the body. The brain has one of the body's richest networks of blood vessels and is especially vulnerable. In vascular dementia, changes in thinking skills sometimes occur suddenly following strokes that block major brain blood vessels. Thinking problems also may begin as mild changes that worsen gradually as a result of multiple minor strokes or other conditions that affect smaller blood vessels, leading to cumulative damage. A growing number of experts prefer the term "vascular cognitive impairment (VCI)" to "vascular dementia" because they feel it better expresses the concept that vascular thinking changes can range from mild to severe. Vascular brain changes often coexist with changes linked to other types of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Several studies have found that vascular changes and other brain abnormalities may interact in ways that increase the likelihood of dementia diagnosis. Sign up for our enews to receive updates about Alzheimer’s and dementia care and research. Vascular dementia is widely considered the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, accounting for 10 percent of cases. Many experts believe that vascular dementia remains underdiagnosed — like Alzheimer's disease — even though it's recognized as common. Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes And Dementia | British Medical Bulletin | Oxford Academic

Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes And Dementia | British Medical Bulletin | Oxford Academic

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes and dementia are set to rise inexorably over the next 3040 years. There are now substantial data to suggest that type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of dementia. This is a narrative review using data from individual studies and review articles known to the authors. A Medline search was also undertaken and reference lists were reviewed to identify additional relevant studies. Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of both Alzheimer's and Vascular dementia, although the reality is that many affected individuals have mixed forms of dementia. The mechanisms underpinning this association remain to be clearly delineated. Type 2 diabetes is a complex disorder and so it is likely that multiple different, synergistic processes may interact to promote cognitive decrements. Recent data suggest that glucocorticoids excess and elevated inflammatory markers may also have a role in the aetiology of diabetes-related cognitive impairment. Large-scale, prospective epidemiological studies are now required to accurately delineate the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment in people with type 2 diabetes. These are underway and randomized trials of diabetes-specific interventions are also starting to include cognitive function as an outcome measure. Type 2 diabetes , cognition , dementia , vascular disease , glucocorticoids At the start of the new millennium, 2.8% of the global population (171 million people) was thought to have diabetes and by 2030, it is predicted that 4.4% of the world population, i.e. 366 million people, will have diabetes. 1 Many reasons are offered for this anticipated risepopulation growth, the shift of people from rural to urban communities in developing countries, the rising tide of obesity, physical in Continue reading >>

Dementia Risk Rises With A1c--not Diabetes Diagnosis

Dementia Risk Rises With A1c--not Diabetes Diagnosis

The news often carries stories that link diabetes and Alzheimer's disease or dementia and make it sound as if a diabetes diagnosis may also doom you to developing these terrible, incurable, life-ruining conditions. These media reports are often based on poor understanding of the studies they cite. Here are what several important studies have really found about this relationship. Dementia Risk Rises with A1c--Not Diabetes Diagnosis The most important point is this: it isn't "diabetes" that raises your risk of developing dementia, it is your average blood sugar. There is a close relationship between A1c and your likelihood of developing dementia. One study that demonstrates this was published in this Diabetes Care in January of 2009. It looked at data from the notorious ACCORD study and concluded two things: "Higher A1C levels are associated with lower cognitive function in individuals with diabetes" and "FPG was not associated with [mental functioning] test performance." Relationship Between Baseline Glycemic Control and Cognitive Function in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors.(ACCORD-MIND) trial. Tali Cukierman-Yaffe et al.Diabetes Care 32:221-226, 2009 The study found that a 1% rise in A1c (i.e. from 6.0% to 7.0%) was associated with a significant decline in scores on three different tests of mental functioning. Though this is depressing news if you have a high A1c, people with diabetes frequently lower their A1cs by huge amounts. For some examples (and these are just a very few examples drawn from public postings and emails I get) visit The 5% Club: They Normalized Their Blood Sugar and So Can You Be very clear about this: The risk factor is not a Diabetes diagnosis. It is high blood sugars--the high blood sugars too many doctors co Continue reading >>

An Update On Type 2 Diabetes, Vascular Dementia And Alzheimer's Disease

An Update On Type 2 Diabetes, Vascular Dementia And Alzheimer's Disease

Volume 47, Issue 11 , November 2012, Pages 858-864 An update on type 2 diabetes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease Author links open overlay panel L.G.Exaltoa Get rights and content The risk of dementia is increased in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This review gives an update on the relation between T2DM and specific dementia subtypes i.e. Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia and underlying pathologies. We will show that while epidemiological studies link T2DM to Alzheimer's disease as well as vascular dementia, neuropathological studies attribute the increased dementia risk in T2DM patients primarily to vascular lesions in the brain. Risk factors for dementia among patients with T2DM are also addressed. Currently, there is evidence that microvascular complications, atherosclerosis and severe hypoglycemic events increase dementia risk. However, for a more complete understanding of risk factors for dementia in T2DM a life time perspective is needed. This should identify which individuals are at increased risk, what are vulnerable periods in life, and what are windows of opportunity for treatment. Currently, there are no DM specific treatments for dementia, but we will review observations from clinical trials that tried to prevent cognitive decline through intensified glycemic control and address other clinical implications of the association between T2DM and dementia. Epidemiological studies link T2DM to Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Autopsy studies attribute dementia in T2DM mainly to vascular lesions in the brain. Micro/macro-vascular complications and severe hypoglycemic increase dementia risk. Prevention of vascular damage is key target in the prevention of dementia in T2DM. A life time perspective is needed on risk factors f Continue reading >>

Your Brain Matters

Your Brain Matters

Type 2 diabetes in mid and late-life is associated with an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment and dementia. All adults, especially once we reach middle age, should have their blood sugar regularly checked by their doctor. What’s the evidence that diabetes affects dementia risk? Research consistently shows that people who have type 2 diabetes are, on average, more likely to develop dementia compared to those without diabetes. Some people who don’t have diabetes have problems with the way their body deals with glucose and insulin. Impaired insulin secretion, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance are also associated with an increased risk of dementia. Several studies have shown that the presence of type 2 diabetes in midlife is associated with increased risk of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and cognitive impairment. Longer duration and greater severity of diabetes may further increase the risk of dementia. A review of relevant studies found that diabetes was associated with a 47% increased risk of any dementia, a 39% increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and a 138% increased risk of vascular dementia (Lu F-P, et al. Diabetes and the risk of multi-system aging phenotypes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 2009, 4(1): e4144. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0004144). Some studies have shown that people with diabetes who are treated with medications have better cognitive function and less cognitive decline over time compared to those who are not treated. More research is needed to be sure that effective treatment of diabetes can reduce dementia risk, but it seems likely that good glucose control would reduce the risk of long-term problems including dementia. Diabetes can be effectively managed. So to reduce your risk of d Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia | Memory And Aging Center

Vascular Dementia | Memory And Aging Center

Hardening of the arteries anywhere in the body Most people with vascular dementia start having symptoms after age 65, although the risk is significantly higher for people in their 80s and 90s. Vascular dementia can cause different symptoms depending on where the blood vessels are damaged in the brain. For example, a person who had a stroke may have sudden problems with memory, balance, or speech. However, a person can have several strokes that may be unnoticeably small, but the damage can add up over time. Many people with vascular dementia have trouble with memory. Others may have difficulty with organization and solving complex problems, slowed thinking, or being easily distracted. People with vascular dementia may also have changes in mood or behavior, such as irritability, loss of interest, or depression. Sometimes, people with vascular dementia have trouble with balance and movement. This might include weakness on one side of the body, and the symptoms may get worse over time. Are There Medicines to Treat Vascular Dementia? Though there is no cure for vascular dementia yet, there are medications that can help manage the symptoms . Sometimes medications used to treat memory problems in Alzheimers disease may be helpful for vascular dementia. Sometimes, people with vascular dementia can have mood changes, such as depression or irritability. These can be managed by medications like the ones used for depression or anxiety. In addition to medications, there are various ways to help a person with vascular dementia. Research has shown that physical exercise and maintaining a healthy weight help to enhance brain health and reduce the risk of heart problems, stroke and other diseases that affect blood vessels. A balanced diet , enough sleep and limited alcohol intake are o Continue reading >>

Investigating The Relationship Between Diabetes And Dementia

Investigating The Relationship Between Diabetes And Dementia

Investigating the relationship between diabetes and dementia Investigating the relationship between diabetes and dementia Read about a research project we funded: Diabetes, Defective Nutrient Signalling and Dementia: an Epidemiological Neuropathology Approach. Lead Investigator: Professor Stephen Wharton Comments from members of our Research Network: 'This study could provide important information in identifying how diabetes contributes to cognitive decline and dementia. It could also lead to further important research' 'Diabetes and obesity are two ticking time bombs. Understanding their contribution to dementia is of immense importance' 'The project makes excellent use of a very important brain bank' Research has shown that diabetes can increase the risk of developing both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. This is thought to be because the mechanisms behind diabetes development can damage small blood vessels in the brain, which is likely to contribute towards vascular dementia. It is also thought that diabetes-related blood vessel damage could lead to a reduced blood flow to the brain, which may be a factor in Alzheimer's disease development. Professor Wharton believes that diabetes mechanisms may also directly cause damage to brain cells. He intends to use this project to further investigate the molecular reasons behind the apparent link between diabetes and dementia. The project will also determine whether a common condition called metabolic syndrome can influence dementia development. Metabolic syndrome encompasses a group of symptoms including obesity, high blood pressure, impaired blood glucose processing and impaired metabolic processes in cells. The project will look at several aspects of diabetes and metabolic syndrome and how these could link to dem Continue reading >>

An Update On Type 2 Diabetes, Vascular Dementia And Alzheimer's Disease.

An Update On Type 2 Diabetes, Vascular Dementia And Alzheimer's Disease.

Exp Gerontol. 2012 Nov;47(11):858-64. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2012.07.014. Epub 2012 Aug 3. An update on type 2 diabetes, vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Department of Neurology, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. [email protected] The risk of dementia is increased in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This review gives an update on the relation between T2DM and specific dementia subtypes - i.e. Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia - and underlying pathologies. We will show that while epidemiological studies link T2DM to Alzheimer's disease as well as vascular dementia, neuropathological studies attribute the increased dementia risk in T2DM patients primarily to vascular lesions in the brain. Risk factors for dementia among patients with T2DM are also addressed. Currently, there is evidence that microvascular complications, atherosclerosis and severe hypoglycemic events increase dementia risk. However, for a more complete understanding of risk factors for dementia in T2DM a life time perspective is needed. This should identify which individuals are at increased risk, what are vulnerable periods in life, and what are windows of opportunity for treatment. Currently, there are no DM specific treatments for dementia, but we will review observations from clinical trials that tried to prevent cognitive decline through intensified glycemic control and address other clinical implications of the association between T2DM and dementia. Continue reading >>

The Association Of Diabetes And Dementia And Possible Implications For Nondiabetic Populations

The Association Of Diabetes And Dementia And Possible Implications For Nondiabetic Populations

Type 2 diabetes has consistently been shown to be associated with increased risk for cognitive decline [1], mild cognitive impairment (MCI) [2] and dementia [3–5]: both vascular dementia [6,7] and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) [6,7]. Such results have been demonstrated for diabetes both in midlife [3,5] and in old age [8,9]. Even prediabetes stages, namely, insulin resistance, have been shown to be associated with increased risk for cognitive decline and with increased rates of brain atrophy [10], both of which are associated with dementia. Similarly, impaired fasting glucose has been associated with cognitive impairment [11]. The results of studies on the association of diabetes with the rate of cognitive decline vary, with the majority showing a higher rate or risk for cognitive decline in diabetic subjects compared with nondiabetic subjects [12–16], some showing no association between the rate of cognitive deterioration and diabetes status [17–19] and others even showing a slower rate of decline in diabetic AD patients [20]. Differences between studies may be attributed to the cognitive status and age range of subjects included, as well as to the tools used to measure cognitive status and the definition of cognitive decline [16]. These differences may also reflect different roles for diabetes as a risk factor for dementia and in the rate of disease progression. The importance of these findings is that diabetes-related characteristics are modifiable, so that the degree of control of plasma glucose levels, prevention or treatment of insulin resistance and/or specific treatments in diabetic patients could potentially prevent dementia or delay its clinical onset. Since diabetes prevalence in the Western world is accelerating alarmingly, such treatments may affect a la Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia |dementia

Vascular Dementia |dementia

Vascular dementia which is the second most common dementia sub-type after AD is caused by damage to the blood vessels that supply brain cells leading to loss of blood flow to the brain. There are a number of different causes of vascular dementia. Vascular dementia can be caused by a series of small strokes that often go unnoticed.These mini-strokes, also referred to as transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), result in temporary, partial blockages of blood supply and brief impairments in consciousness or sight. Vascular dementia can have a step-wise progression where symptomsworsen gradually as a result of further minor strokes or other conditions that affect smaller blood vessels leading to cumulative damage. One single large stroke can sometimes cause vascular dementia depending on the size and location of the stroke.This type of vascular dementia, called strategic infarct dementia, is characterized by (following the stroke) the sudden onset of changes in thinking skills and behavior. Symptoms vary depending on the area of the brain affected by the damage.Providing no further strokes occur, symptoms may stabilize and in some cases can improve. Another form of vascular dementia is called subcortical dementia, or Binswangers disease.This is associated with disease in the brains small blood vessels system and damage to subcortical areas of the brain.It can be a consequence of untreated high blood pressure or diabetes leading to vascular disease.Symptoms often include deterioration of reasoning and thinking skills, mild memory problems, walking or movement problems and behavioural changes.Subcortical dementia is usually progressive with symptoms getting worse over time as more vascular damage occurs. It is possible to have a dementia caused by both vascular disease and Alzheim Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Vascular Dementia - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Vascular dementia is a general term describing problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, memory and other thought processes caused by brain damage from impaired blood flow to your brain. You can develop vascular dementia after a stroke blocks an artery in your brain, but strokes don't always cause vascular dementia. Whether a stroke affects your thinking and reasoning depends on your stroke's severity and location. Vascular dementia can also result from other conditions that damage blood vessels and reduce circulation, depriving your brain of vital oxygen and nutrients. Factors that increase your risk of heart disease and stroke including diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking also raise your vascular dementia risk. Controlling these factors may help lower your chances of developing vascular dementia. Vascular dementia symptoms vary, depending on the part of your brain where blood flow is impaired. Symptoms often overlap with those of other types of dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease dementia. Vascular dementia signs and symptoms include: Sudden or frequent urge to urinate or inability to control passing urine Vascular dementia symptoms may be most clear-cut when they occur suddenly following a stroke. When changes in your thinking and reasoning seem clearly linked to a stroke, this condition is sometimes called post-stroke dementia. Sometimes a characteristic pattern of vascular dementia symptoms follows a series of strokes or ministrokes. Changes in your thought processes occur in noticeable steps downward from your previous level of function, unlike the gradual, steady decline that typically occurs in Alzheimer's disease dementia. But vascular dementia can also develop very gradually, just like Alzheimer's disease dementia. What's more, Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia

Vascular Dementia

Vascular dementia is a common type of dementia caused by reduced blood flow to the brain. It's estimated to affect around 150,000 people in the UK. "Dementia" is the name for problems with mental abilities caused by gradual changes and damage in the brain. It's rare in people under 65. Vascular dementia tends to get worse over time, although it's sometimes possible to slow it down. Symptoms of vascular dementia Vascular dementia can start suddenly or come on slowly over time. Symptoms include: slowness of thought difficulty with planning and understanding problems with concentration mood, personality or behavioural changes feeling disorientated and confused difficulty walking and keeping balance symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, such as problems with memory and language (many people with vascular dementia also have Alzheimer's) These problems can make daily activities increasingly difficult and someone with the condition may eventually be unable to look after themselves. Read more about the symptoms of vascular dementia. Getting medical advice See your GP if you think you have early symptoms of dementia, especially if you're over 65 years of age. If it's spotted at an early stage, treatment may be able to stop the vascular dementia getting worse, or at least slow it down. If you're worried about someone else, encourage them to make an appointment with their GP and perhaps suggest that you go with them. Your GP can do some simple checks to try to find the cause of your symptoms and they can refer you to a memory clinic or another specialist for further tests if needed. Read more about getting a dementia diagnosis. Tests for vascular dementia There's no single test for vascular dementia. The following are needed to make a diagnosis: an assessment of symptoms – for exampl Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia Symptoms: Diabetes Sufferers At Greater Risk Of Condition | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Vascular Dementia Symptoms: Diabetes Sufferers At Greater Risk Of Condition | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Vacular dementia: The illness can develop following a stroke or series of strokes Emmerdale actor John Middleton is currently starring in a storyline that sees his character, Ashley, struggle with the illness. A special episode airing tonight will show the world how Ashley sees it. Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia after Alzheimer's disease . It can cause memory loss and difficulties with thinking and language. Symptoms occur when the brain is damage because of problems with blood supply to the brain. It can be caused by the narrowing of the blood vessels inside the brain, or a stroke, which causes the blood supply to the brain to be cut off, usually as a result of a blood clot. Vascular dementia: John Middleton plays Ashley in Emmerdale While not everyone who has a stroke will develop vascular dementia, the Alzheimers Society said one in five people who have a stroke will develop post-stroke dementia within the following six months. The condition can be caused by a series of mini strokes which cause damage to the brain. These can often be symptomless or cause temporary symptoms. To function properly, brain cells need a constant supply of blood. But if the vascular system is affected - the way in which blood is delivered to the brain - brain cells can be damaged and they will eventually die. Around one in ten people with dementia are diagnosed with mixed dementia - which means that Alzheimers disease and vascular dementia have caused the symptoms. Dementia affects the ability to remember, think and reason. Here are the early signs to look out for in yourself and loved ones. Vascular dementia: Risk of developing condition higher in stroke survivors and diabetics The most common cognitive symptoms in the early stages of vascular dementia are pr Continue reading >>

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