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Diabetes Urine Ph Level

Urine Ph Level Test: Purpose, Procedure & Side Effects

Urine Ph Level Test: Purpose, Procedure & Side Effects

A urine pH level test is a test that analyzes the acidity or alkalinity of a urine sample . Its a simple and painless test. Many diseases , your diet, and the medicines you take can affect how acidic or basic your urine is. For instance, results that are either too high or low can indicate the likelihood that your body will form kidney stones . If your urine is at an extreme on either the low or high end of pH levels, you can adjust your diet to reduce the likelihood of painful kidney stones. In short, your urine pH is an indicator of your overall health and gives your doctor important clues as to whats going on in your body. Kidney stones are small masses of minerals that can collect in the kidneys and cause pain as they prevent urine from passing through your kidneys and urinary system. Since these stones tend to form in a highly acidic or basic/alkaline environment, your doctor may test your urine to determine the likelihood you will form kidney stones. Certain medications can make your urine more acidic. Your physician may order the urine pH level test to determine whether your medications are making your urine too acidic. The urine pH level test can also determine the best medication to prescribe when you have a urinary tract infection . Prior to testing, your doctor may ask you to stop taking certain medications known to affect your urine pH. Examples of these drugs include: thiazide diuretics , used to treat high blood pressure and to reduce the risk of stroke and heart attacks However, dont make changes to your diet prior to the urine pH level test unless directed to by your doctor. The foods you eat affect your urine pH, and you want the test to be as accurate as possible in predicting your typical urine pH level. The test will help your doctor identify the ca Continue reading >>

The Alkaline Diet: Balancing Acid And Base

The Alkaline Diet: Balancing Acid And Base

If you thought fashion was subject to trends, you should take a look at diets. A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the raw food diet. This week, I’ll focus on what’s called the “alkaline diet,” which is sometimes called the “alkaline acid diet.” Getting Your “pH-acts” Straight My guess is that most of you took chemistry at some point in your school career. Unless you completely tuned out, you may remember a discussion of acid-base balance, which is measured by something called “pH.” The human body has a particular range of pH that it needs to be at for good health. The pH is simply a measure of acid-base balance in the body. A pH of 0 is very acidic, 7 is neutral, and a 14 is very alkaline. In normal situations, the body likes to be at a pH of 7.35 to 7.45. The stomach, however, which is very acidic (thanks to hydrochloric acid), has a much lower pH of 1.35 to 3.50. In a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), ketones, which are acids, build up in the blood and urine. If DKA isn’t treated promptly, the condition may be life-threatening. Why an Alkaline Diet? The premise behind the alkaline diet dates back, not surprisingly, to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Way back then, the diet consisted largely of fresh fruit, roots, vegetables, and tubers. Things apparently went awry when grains, meats, sugars, and dairy foods were introduced, and the diet became more “acidic.” Promoters of the alkaline diet believe that the typical Western diet (which definitely has its flaws) makes the blood more acidic and upsets the acid-base balance in the body. In addition, an acidic diet is believed (by proponents of the alkaline diet) to lead to a loss of potassium, magnesium, calcium, and sodium from the body. Hence, the alkaline diet should be followed to Continue reading >>

Fasting Single-spot Urine Ph Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome In The Japanese Population

Fasting Single-spot Urine Ph Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome In The Japanese Population

Fasting Single-Spot Urine pH Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in the Japanese Population Shimodaira M.a, b Okaniwa S.a Nakayama T.b Department of Internal Medicine, Iida Municipal Hospital Objective: To investigate the relationship between urine pH and metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, while controlling for covariates. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 5,430 Japanese subjects (4,691 without MetS; 739 with MetS) undergoing health assessments. Partial correlation analysis and analysis of covariance were used for controlling confounding parameters (age, gender, levels of serum uric acid and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and smoking and drinking status). Using multiple logistic regression analyses, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for MetS incidence were calculated across urine pH categories. Path analysis was used to determine the relationship between MetS and urine pH. Results: Subjects with MetS had significantly lower urine pH (5.9 0.7) than those without MetS (6.0 0.7) (p < 0.001). Partial correlation analysis showed that systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglyceride and fasting plasma glucose levels were negatively correlated with urine pH, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was positively correlated with urine pH. Analysis of covariance indicated that urine pH decreased with an increasing number of metabolic abnormalities. Adjusted ORs (95% CI) for the presence of MetS in subjects with urine pH 5.5-6.0 and pH <5.5 were 1.34 (1.04-1.73) and 1.52 (1.09-2.13), respectively (reference: subjects with a urine pH >6.0). Conclusion: The MetS and its components were independently associated with lower urine pH. 2017 The Author(s) Publis Continue reading >>

Beware The Low Urine Ph--the Major Cause Of The Increased Prevalence Of Nephrolithiasis In The Patient With Type 2 Diabetes.

Beware The Low Urine Ph--the Major Cause Of The Increased Prevalence Of Nephrolithiasis In The Patient With Type 2 Diabetes.

Beware the low urine pH--the major cause of the increased prevalence of nephrolithiasis in the patient with type 2 diabetes. Southside Endocrinology, University of Alabama Medical School, 1020 26th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35205, USA. [email protected] Diabetes Obes Metab. 2012 Apr;14(4):299-303. doi: 10.1111/j.1463-1326.2011.01519.x. Epub 2011 Nov 13. There is an increased prevalence of nephrolithiasis and an increase in the incidence of renal colic in patients with diabetes, obesity, hypertension and insulin resistance because of an increased frequency of uric acid crystallization. Uric acid crystallization occurs in the milieu of an acid urine and is not due to hyperuricosuria as with insulin resistance, urinary uric acid levels are generally decreased because of increased renal tubular reabsorption. However, in the presence of insulin resistance, there is decreased renal tubular generation of ammonia and increased sodium absorption leading to acidification of the urine and uric acid crystallization. The presence of a low urine pH should alert the clinician to the increased risk of nephrolithiasis particularly in the obese, diabetic or hypertensive patient. Prevention of nephrolithiasis can be achieved in susceptible individuals either by alkalizing the urine and/or by further decreasing the uric acid content of the urine with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor such as allopurinol. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Urine Tests

Diabetes Urine Tests

Urine tests may be done in people with diabetes to evaluate severe hyperglycemia (severe high blood sugar) by looking for ketones in the urine. Ketones are a metabolic product produced when fat is metabolized. Ketones increase when there is insufficient insulin to use glucose for energy. Urine tests are also done to look for the presence of protein in the urine, which is a sign of kidney damage. Urine glucose measurements are less reliable than blood glucose measurements and are not used to diagnose diabetes or evaluate treatment for diabetes. They may be used for screening purposes. Testing for ketones is most common in people with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms? This test detects the presence of ketones, which are byproducts of metabolism that form in the presence of severe hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar). Ketones are formed from fat that is burned by the body when there is insufficient insulin to allow glucose to be used for fuel. When ketones build up to high levels, ketoacidosis (a serious and life-threatening condition) may occur. Ketone testing can be performed both at home and in the clinical laboratory. Ketones can be detected by dipping a test strip into a sample of urine. A color change on the test strip signals the presence of ketones in the urine. Ketones occur most commonly in people with type 1 diabetes, but uncommonly, people with type 2 diabetes may test positive for ketones. The microalbumin test detects microalbumin, a type of protein, in the urine. Protein is present in the urine when there is damage to the kidneys. Since the damage to blood vessels that occurs as a complication of diabetes can lead to kidney problems, the microalbumin test is done to check for damage to the kidneys over time. Can urine tests be used to Continue reading >>

Ph Balance And Diabetes

Ph Balance And Diabetes

Earlier, I looked at several diseases that might be helped with an alkaline diet . Today, I am adding diabetes to that list. Before I look at how pH balance might help diabetes, I need to clarify some important points about alkaline diets and pH balance. I will explain the importance of measuring food intake the right way. Then I will describe a nutrition study showing a link between correctly measured alkaline foods and diabetes. Both these terms are used widely in books, the Internet, and wider media. They are related in that pH Balance is what we strive to achieve, and alkaline diet is the way to achieve it. pH Balance simply means that the food you eat balances the acid load on your kidneys. It is measured by testing urine: The target pH for urine in healthy individuals is 6.5 to 7 in the morning, rising to 7.5 through the day. Confusion arises when people publish data on food pH values, made worse because they usually omit to explain how pH has been measured. Food pH, however it is measured, does not affect acid load. It is useless, and potentially dangerous, to measure pH values for food or food ash. We know that alkaline diets can be beneficial, but if you use the wrong measurements, you can mistakenly eat too many acid-forming foods or eat too few alkaline-forming foods. The correct food measurements for alkaline diets estimate the acid load on the kidneys. PRAL (Potential Renal Acid Load) is currently the best measurement, though I have also explained other options for defining pH Balance Diet Scores . A Recent nutrition study has discovered a link between pH balance and diabetes. Dietary acid load and risk of type 2 diabetes: the E3N-EPIC cohort study was published last year by Fagherazzi and colleagues. Though this is a statistical study, it does provide evi Continue reading >>

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

Diabetes causes your body's pH levels to become more acidic and develop a condition called ketoacidosis, the American Diabetes Association explains. Your body's pH level refers to the acidity or alkalinity of the fluids in your body. Diabetes impairs your body's ability to properly utilize the glucose in your blood. Instead, your body is forced to convert fat into energy through a process that develops into ketoacidosis. Diagnosing ketoacidosis involves testing blood for the presence of ketones, the University of Maryland Medical Center explains. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is congenital, and its symptoms appear as early as childhood, MayoClinic.com explains. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by your body's inability to produce insulin, the hormone needed for cells to metabolize glucose into energy. Type 2 diabetes is essentially defined by acquired insulin resistance that usually manifests in adulthood. Both types of diabetes cause increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, hypertension and ketoacidosis. Left untreated, both types of diabetes lead to complications that damage your cardiovascular system, kidneys and nerves due to the accumulated glucose in your blood. Complications due to diabetes such as ketoacidosis are fatal if not treated. Ketones are the acidic byproducts of fat breakdown that accumulate when your body uses fat instead of glucose as a source of fuel, MedlinePlus, a service of the National Institutes of Health, explains. As your ketone levels increase, your body becomes more acidic. Ketones are present in both types of diabetes but are generally more typical of type 1 diabetes. Ketones are also sometimes present in urine. Acetone and acetoacetic acid are examples of ketones. Ketoacidosis does not happen o Continue reading >>

Your Urine Is Not A Window To Your Body: Ph Balancing – A Failed Hypothesis

Your Urine Is Not A Window To Your Body: Ph Balancing – A Failed Hypothesis

One of my first encounters with “alternative” health was the “pH balance” idea. A customer approached me at the pharmacy counter and asked for “pH test strips.” I asked him about kidney stones, diabetes – the usual reasons you test your urine. He told me he was healthy, and he was just monitoring his body’s “acid balance” and that he kept his body “alkali” to be healthy. “You can’t change your body’s pH, sir – if your pH changes, you’ll die,” I explained, in my most reassuring pharmacist voice. “You don’t know what you’re talking about,” he snapped at me, “I adjust my pH all the time.” I handed over the urine testing strips, rang it into the cash register, and wondered, what is this guy talking about? Where did he get the idea he could manipulate his body’s acidity? The pH balancing concept covers a variety of alternative health ideas, practices and treatments. The idea that our body’s acidity needs monitoring and adjusting is regularly promoted by “alternative” health providers – particularly naturopaths, but supported by pharmacies that sell urine test strips, and supplements like greens+ [PDF]. pH testing and monitoring is held out as a panacea for pretty much everything: “Virtually all degenerative diseases including cancer, heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, kidney and gall stones, and tooth decay are associated with excess acidity in the body” says a typical website. The medical profession, and the medical literature, is quiet on the topic of pH balancing. So let’s consider a few questions. What’s the premise and hypothesis for pH balancing and testing our urine? Does the amount of acidity in our urine give us meaningful insight into our health? Can dietary changes and and supplements prevent a Continue reading >>

Urine Ph As A Predictor Of Diabetes

Urine Ph As A Predictor Of Diabetes

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01017848 Information provided by (Responsible Party): Suzanne El-Sayegh, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System Study Description Study Design Groups and Cohorts Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Urine pH has been lately linked to insulin resistance. The early phase of Diabetes Mellitus involves insulin resistance. Thus, the investigators want to check if a simple cheap study like a urine analysis that can predict diabetes. adults who are nondiabetic, no CKD, no urinary tract infection, no bladder dysfunction development of diabetes using a predicting formula [TimeFrame:10 years] Study Description Study Design Groups and Cohorts Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. Continue reading >>

How To Measure Blood Acidosis And Urinary Ph Levels To Monitor Your Adrenal Health

How To Measure Blood Acidosis And Urinary Ph Levels To Monitor Your Adrenal Health

How to Measure Blood Acidosis and Urinary pH Levels to Monitor Your Adrenal Health How to Measure Blood Acidosis and Urinary pH Levels to Monitor Your Adrenal Health Your healthcare provider can order two blood tests to get a sense of how acidic your blood is to monitor for adrenal fatigue. The first test is a serum (blood) bicarbonate level. The level of bicarbonate (a base) is often measured in the routine blood work that your doctor orders. Its often part of a lab chemistry panel called a CHEM-7 or a basic metabolic panel. A normal reference range for a serum bicarbonate level in the blood is 23 to 27 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L). Levels less than 23 suggest that your blood is more acidic than it should be, making it a source of acute adrenal stress. Other lab chemistries sometimes reveal other conditions that may be causing your blood to be acidic: Diabetes: If your glucose level is really high (a normal level is 70 to 100milligrams per deciliter or less), an element of diabetes may be causing the acidosis. Kidney problems: If your serum creatinine level is higher than normal, a kidney problem may be contributing to your acidosis. For most people, a serum creatinine less than 1.0 milligram per deciliter means the kidneys are functioning normally. Adrenal exhaustion: If your sodium level is low and your potassium level is high, adrenal exhaustion may be contributing to your acidosis. The range for a normal sodium level in the blood is 135 to 140 mEq/L. The normal potassium range in the blood is 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L. The second pH test is a check of the bloods pH level. A normal pH is approximately 7.36. Anything less than that is acidic. Doctors may order a pH from blood initially, in addition to other serum chemistries, if multiple reasons suggest that the body i Continue reading >>

How Do Sugars Affect A Person's Urine Ph?

How Do Sugars Affect A Person's Urine Ph?

Urine pH is a measurement of your urine’s relative acidity. Your doctor may need to check your urine acidity if you need to take certain medications or have known risks for the formation of kidney stones. Normally, sugars in your body don’t directly affect your urine pH. However, in certain circumstances, your sugar glucose can show up during the same procedure used to check urine pH levels. Video of the Day Doctors check urine pH with a procedure called a dipstick test, which places fresh urine in contact with a plastic stick coated in strips of specially formulated chemicals. These chemicals trigger detectable changes that vary according to the qualities of your urine. Human urine can fall anywhere from 4.5 to 8 on the pH scale, which extends from a highly acidic reading of zero to a highly alkaline reading of 14. However, in most cases, the pH of human urine is a moderately acidic 5.5 to 6.5. Dietary Influences There are several dietary factors that can influence your urine pH. For instance, high intake of vegetables, dairy products or citrus fruits can make your urine less acidic and raise your pH levels. On the other hand, high intake of cranberries or various forms of meat can make your urine more acidic and lower your pH levels. In advance of a urine pH test, your doctor may ask you to eat a diet that balances acidic and alkaline foods. This will minimize medically unimportant changes in your pH level and allow your doctor to detect changes that could have potential health implications. When you consume sugar or other carbohydrate foods, your body breaks them down and passes a simple sugar called glucose into your bloodstream. Normally, a hormone from your pancreas gland called insulin lets your body manage this glucose and deliver it to your cells, where it Continue reading >>

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine as a Diagnostic Tool A long time ago, disgusting as it may be, people used to actually taste and drink urine in order to try and diagnose a patient's disease! I'm not even kidding you. Thankfully, modern-day doctors do not have to resort to such disgusting and even dangerous methods. One of the reasons the doctor barbers of yesteryear used to drink their patient's urine was to see if it had a sweet taste, often indicative of diabetes mellitus. Finding the sweet-tasting glucose in the urine was covered in detail in another lesson, so we'll focus on other important measurements here instead. Interpreting Urine pH One value that can be measured in the urine is known as urine pH. pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. If the pH is low, then it is acidic. If the pH is high, then it is basic, or alkaline. To remember which is which, I'll give you a little trick that has worked for me. If you grew up watching cartoons, you probably saw some comical ones where cartoonish robbers poured acid on the roof of a bank vault and waited while the acid ate its way downward into the vault, so the robbers could get down there to steal all the cash. If you can recall that acid likes to eat its way downward into things, then you'll remember that acidic substances go down the pH scale. That is to say, their pH numbers are lower than basic substances. Normal urine pH is roughly 4.6-8, with an average of 6. Urine pH can increase, meaning it will become more basic, or alkaline, due to: A urinary tract infection Kidney failure The administration of certain drugs such as sodium bicarbonate Vegetarian diets On the flip side, causes for a decreased, or acidic, urine pH, include: Metabolic or respiratory acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis, a complication of diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

Urine Ph

Urine Ph

Urine pH is used to classify urine as either adilute acid or base solution. Seven is the point of neutrality onthe pH scale. The lower the pH, the greater the acidity of asolution; the higher the pH, the greater the alkalinity. Theglomerular filtrate of blood is usually acidified by the kidneysfrom a pH of approximately 7.4 to a pH of about 6 in the urine.Depending on the person's acid-base status, the pH of urine mayrange from 4.5 to 8. The kidneys maintain normal acid-basebalance primarily through the reabsorption of sodium and thetubular secretion of hydrogen and ammonium ions. Urine becomesincreasingly acidic as the amount of sodium and excess acidretained by the body increases. Alkaline urine, usuallycontaining bicarbonate-carbonic acid buffer, is normally excretedwhen there is an excess of base or alkali in the body. Secretionof an acid or alkaline urine by the kidneys is one of the mostimportant mechanisms the body uses to maintain a constant bodypH. Respiratory diseases that involve hyperventilation (blowing off carbon dioxide and the development of alkalosis) In people who are not vegetarians, the pH ofurine tends to be acidic. A diet rich in citrus fruits, legumes,and vegetables raises the pH and produces urine that is morealkaline. Most of the bacteria responsible for urinary tractinfections make the urine more alkaline because the bacteriasplit urea into ammonia and other alkaline waste products. Theurine pH varies in different types of acidosis and alkalosis.Control of pH is important in the management of several diseases,including bacteriuria, renal calculi, and drug therapy. The formation of renal stones is related to theurine pH. Patients being treated for renal calculi are frequentlygiven diets or medications to change the pH of the urine so thatkidney Continue reading >>

Original Articles: Metabolic Basis For Low Urine Ph In Type 2 Diabetes

Original Articles: Metabolic Basis For Low Urine Ph In Type 2 Diabetes

Metabolic Basis for Low Urine pH in Type 2 Diabetes We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Metabolic Basis for Low Urine pH in Type 2 Diabetes Naim M. Maalouf, Mary Ann Cameron, [...], and Khashayar Sakhaee Background and objectives: Type 2 diabetes is associated with excessively low urine pH, which increases the risk for uric acid nephrolithiasis. This study was conducted to assess the metabolic basis responsible for the excessive urinary acidity of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Nine nonstone-forming patients who had type 2 diabetes and low urine pH and 16 age- and body mass indexmatched nonstone-forming volunteers without type 2 diabetes were maintained on a constant metabolic diet for 7 days, and 24-hour urine was collected on the last 2 days of the diet. Results: Urine dietary markers (potassium, sulfate, phosphorus, and urea nitrogen) were not different between the two groups. Patients with type 2 diabetes exhibited a significantly lower 24-hour urine pH (5.45 0.27 versus 5.90 0.42; P < 0.01) and higher net acid excretion (NAE; 57 12 versus 38 18 mEq/d; P < 0.01) compared with control subjects. The proportion of NAE excreted as ammonium (NH4+/NAE) was significantly lower in patients with type 2 diabetes than in control subjects (0.70 0.12 versus 0.94 0.36; P < 0.01); however, the greater NAE in patients with type 2 diabetes was not accounted for by the differences Continue reading >>

Urine Composition In Type 2 Diabetes: Predisposition To Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

Urine Composition In Type 2 Diabetes: Predisposition To Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

Abstract Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis in general and has been associated with uric acid stones in particular. The purpose of this study was to identify the metabolic features that place patients with type 2 diabetes at increased risk for uric acid nephrolithiasis. Three groups of individuals were recruited for this outpatient study: Patients who have type 2 diabetes and are not stone formers (n = 24), patients who do not have diabetes and are uric acid stone formers (UASF; n = 8), and normal volunteers (NV; n = 59). Participants provided a fasting blood sample and a single 24-h urine collection for stone risk analysis. Twenty-four-hour urine volume and total uric acid did not differ among the three groups. Patients with type 2 diabetes and UASF had lower 24-h urine pH than NV. Urine pH inversely correlated with both body weight and 24-h urine sulfate in all groups. Urine pH remained significantly lower in patients with type 2 diabetes and UASF than NV after adjustment for weight and urine sulfate (P < 0.01). For a given urine sulfate, urine net acid excretion tended to be higher in patients with type 2 diabetes versus NV. With increasing urine sulfate, NV and patients with type 2 diabetes had a similar rise in urine ammonium, whereas in UASF, ammonium excretion remained unchanged. The main risk factor for uric acid nephrolithiasis in patients with type 2 diabetes is a low urine pH. Higher body mass and increased acid intake can contribute to but cannot entirely account for the lower urine pH in patients with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

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