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Diabetes Urination

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

My Sugars Are Normal… What’s Causing My Frequent Urination?

My Sugars Are Normal… What’s Causing My Frequent Urination?

Q: I thought that people with diabetes experience frequent urination only when their BGs are high. Is this incorrect? Could frequent urination even when a person has consistently normal BGs be an indication of another medical problem? Mary Udell Cleveland A: Generally, the frequent urination caused by diabetes is related to high blood sugars (over 250 mg/dl for several hours or more), due to myriad causes, including overeating, inadequate insulin or medication doses and stress. In this case, there is passage of large volumes of urine. When blood sugars are normal, if there is frequent urination, it could come from other causes, which may or may not be related to diabetes. Impaired bladder emptying related to neuropathy, prostate enlargement or an overactive bladder are the three most common causes. Medications, particularly diuretics, can also be the cause. Then, there are some other underlying medical disorders that could be factors. If your blood sugars are in the normal range of 70 to 140 mg/dl and you are experiencing frequent urination, it is important to seek professional advice on finding other causes. Peter Lodewick, MD Diabetes Care Center Birmingham, Alabama I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms … Continue reading >>

Polyuria And Type 1 Diabetes

Polyuria And Type 1 Diabetes

What causes frequent urination with diabetes? Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than normal. Frequent urination is also a symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes that can lead to extreme dehydration and eventually affect your kidney function. Polyuria in diabetes occurs when you have excess levels of sugar in the blood. Normally, when your kidneys create urine, they reabsorb all of the sugar and direct it back to the bloodstream. With type 1 diabetes, excess glucose ends up in the urine, where it pulls more water and results in more urine. What should I do if I think I’m experiencing type 1 diabetes-related polyuria? If you find you are suddenly urinating more frequently—especially if it’s accompanied by other symptoms—it’s important to see your doctor. As we mentioned above the dehydration that results from polyuria, or excessive urination, can lead to kidney problems—or even diabetic ketoacidosis, which can be life-threatening. Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent urination means having an urge to pass urine more often than usual. It can disrupt one's normal routine, interrupt the sleep cycle, and it can be a sign of an underlying medical condition. Many people live with frequent urination, known medically as frequency. When one urinates more than 3 liters a day of urine, this is known as polyuria. Often, there is often a simple cause that can be put right through treatment. Frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, where there is leakage of urine. Sometimes, frequent urination can indicate a more serious condition. Early identification of the problem can lead to a timely and effective treatment and prevent complications. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about frequent urination. More detail is in the main article. Urinary frequency, or just frequency, is different from urinary incontinence. Most people urinate 6 or 7 times in 24 hours. Urinating more often than this may be referred to as frequency, but everyone is different. It is normally only a problem if it affects a person's quality of life. Frequency can often be treated with exercises, but if there is an underlying condition, such as diabetes, this will need attention. What is frequent urination? Urination is the way the body gets rid of waste fluids. Urine contains water, uric acid, urea, and toxins and waste filtered from within the body. The kidneys play a key role in this process. Urine stays in the urinary bladder until it reaches a point of fullness and an urge to urinate. At this point, the urine is expelled from the body. Urinary frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, which refers to having little control over the bladder. Urinary frequency just means needing to visit the bathroom to urinate more often. It can occur a Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Frequent Urination

Must Read Articles Related To Frequent Urination

Myrbetriq® (mirabegron) is not for everyone. Do not use Myrbetriq if you have an allergy to mirabegron or any ingredients in Myrbetriq. Myrbetriq may cause your blood pressure to increase or make your blood pressure worse if you have a history of high blood pressure. It is recommended that your doctor check your blood pressure while you are taking Myrbetriq. Myrbetriq may increase your chances of not being able to empty your bladder. Tell your doctor right away if you have trouble emptying your bladder or you have a weak urine stream. Myrbetriq may cause allergic reactions that may be serious. If you experience swelling of the face, lips, throat or tongue, with or without difficulty breathing, stop taking Myrbetriq and tell your doctor right away. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including medications for overactive bladder or other medicines such as thioridazine (Mellaril™ and Mellaril‑S™), flecainide (Tambocor®), propafenone (Rythmol®), digoxin (Lanoxin®). Myrbetriq may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how Myrbetriq works. Before taking Myrbetriq, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney problems. The most common side effects of Myrbetriq include increased blood pressure, common cold symptoms (nasopharyngitis), urinary tract infection, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, and headache. For further information, please talk to your healthcare professional and see accompanying Patient Product Information and complete Prescribing Information for Myrbetriq® (mirabegron). You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088. A A A Frequent Urination (cont.) Urinary tract infection: The lining of the urethra (the tube that c Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes symptoms may occur when blood sugar levels in the body become abnormally elevated. The most common symptoms of diabetes include: increased thirst increased hunger excessive fatigue increased urination, especially at night blurry vision Symptoms can vary from one person to the next. They also depend on which type of diabetes you have. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to begin abruptly and dramatically. Type 1 diabetes is most often seen in children, adolescents, and young adults. However, type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. In addition to the symptoms listed above, people with type 1 diabetes may notice a quick and sudden weight loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. Although it primarily develops in adults, it’s beginning to be seen more frequently in younger people. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being overweight, being sedentary, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes don’t experience any symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms are slow to develop. Oftentimes, your symptoms may seem harmless. The most common symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst and fatigue, are often vague. When experienced on their own, symptoms such as these may not be anything to worry about. If you’re experiencing one or more of these symptoms, you should speak with your doctor about being screened for diabetes. Frequent thirst You’ve had glass after glass of water, but you still feel like you need more. This is because your muscles and other tissues are dehydrated. When your blood sugar levels rise, your body tries to pull fluid from other tissues to dilute the sugar in your bloodstream. This process can cause your body to dehydrate, prompting you to drink more water. Frequent urination Drinking excessive amou Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Does How Often You Pee Say Something About Your Health?

Does How Often You Pee Say Something About Your Health?

If you’ve ever wondered how often you should pee on a daily basis, you’re not alone. How often you urinate is actually a very important sign of your overall health, beginning in infancy and continuing throughout your life. Keep reading to learn more about urination and when your pee may signal that you need to visit your doctor. A healthy person may urinate anywhere from four to ten times in a day. The average amount, however, is usually between six and seven times in a 24-hour period. But it’s not out of the ordinary to urinate more or less on any given day. How much you pee depends on many factors, such as: age how much you drink in a day what you drink medical conditions, such as diabetes or a urinary tract infection medication usage bladder size Special circumstances, such as pregnancy and the weeks after giving birth, can affect how often you urinate as well. During pregnancy, a woman urinates more frequently due to fluid changes along with bladder pressure from the growing fetus. After birth, a woman will have an increased urinary output for up to eight weeks. This is because of the extra fluids she may have received during labor from an IV, or medicine, as well as the body’s natural response to mobilize and eliminate fluids after birth. Several medical conditions may affect how often you pee, such as urinary incontinence or retention, or prostate issues for men. Other conditions that may cause excessive urination include: Diabetes. If you have diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes, the extra sugar in your bloodstream causes fluid to shift so that you urinate more frequently. Hypo or hypercalcemia. If the calcium levels in your body are unbalanced, whether they’re too high or too low, this can upset the urine flow in your body. Sickle cell anemia. This condit Continue reading >>

Polyuria - Frequent Urination

Polyuria - Frequent Urination

Tweet Polyuria is a condition where the body urinates more than usual and passes excessive or abnormally large amounts of urine each time you urinate. Polyuria is defined as the frequent passage of large volumes of urine - more than 3 litres a day compared to the normal daily urine output in adults of about one to two litres. It is one of the main symptoms of diabetes (both type 1 and type 2 diabetes) and can lead to severe dehydration, which if left untreated can affect kidney function. Causes of polyuria Polyuria is usually the result of drinking excessive amounts of fluids (polydipsia), particularly water and fluids that contain caffeine or alcohol. It is also one of the major signs of diabetes mellitus. When the kidneys filter blood to make urine, they reabsorb all of the sugar, returning it to the bloodstream. In diabetes, the level of sugar in the blood is abnormally high. Not all of the sugar can be reabsorbed and some of this excess glucose from the blood ends up in the urine where it draws more water. This results in unusually large volumes of urine. Other causes of polyuria include: Diabetes inspidus - a condition unrelated to diabetes mellitus that affects the kidneys and the hormones that interact with them, resulting in large quantities of urine being produced. Kidney disease Liver failure Medications that include diuretics (substances that increase the excretion of water from the body/urine) Chronic diarrhoea Cushing’s syndrome Psychogenic polydipsia - excessive water drinking most often seen in anxious, middle-aged women and in patients with psychiatric illnesses Hypercalcemia - elevated levels of calcium in the blood Pregnancy Polyuria as a symptom of diabetes As well as being one of the symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes, polyuria can also occur in peop Continue reading >>

Resolving Diabetes-related Bladder Problems

Resolving Diabetes-related Bladder Problems

Diabetes can cause a host of medical complications, some well-known and others less so. Bladder and voiding (bladder emptying) problems are quite common in people with diabetes, both in those who have had trouble maintaining good blood glucose control and in those who have been able to keep a tight rein on their levels. The bad news is that bladder problems, like so many complications of diabetes, are at first “silent” ones — they can go unsuspected for months or even years before suddenly manifesting themselves. The good news is that by looking out for certain warning signs, you can catch bladder problems early and treat them before permanent injury is done. Why bladder problems? The reason people with diabetes develop bladder problems is complex and involves the bladder muscles and the nerves that control them. The picture is further complicated by the fact that people with diabetes can develop all of the same bladder and voiding problems as people who don’t have diabetes. For instance, women with diabetes can develop the same overactive bladder problems (including feeling sudden urges to void and needing to void more frequently) that women without diabetes often have. Likewise, men with and without diabetes tend to develop enlarged prostates as they get older, causing both obstruction of the flow of urine and irritability of the bladder (a condition that has symptoms similar to overactive bladder, but different treatments). A stroke or a herniated disk compressing a spinal nerve, among other non-diabetes-related conditions, can also cause bladder problems. Sometimes a person with diabetes may have bladder and voiding problems with multiple causes, only one of which is diabetes. Seeing a physician who is familiar with the many possible causes of bladder dysfun Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Make You Urinate So Much?

Why Does Diabetes Make You Urinate So Much?

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, but more than a quarter of them don’t know it. Frequent urination may be one of the first signs that you have high blood sugar, a hallmark sign of diabetes. When you have diabetes, your body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels. Excess sugar causes more fluids to pass through the kidneys and increases urinary frequency, known as polyuria. “There are other reasons that people with type 2 diabetes can have increased urinary frequency and incontinence,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “But the most common cause is hyperglycemia [high blood sugar], or uncontrolled diabetes.” Polyuria is not as serious as many other complications commonly associated with diabetes, such as blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and premature death. But it can be a sign that your blood sugar is elevated, so it’s something you should address with your doctor. Frequent urination is not the only bladder problem that occurs in people with diabetes. They may experience a frequent urge to urinate (even if only a small amount of urine comes out), a loss of bladder control that results in leaking urine, and urinary tract or fungal infections. Such infections can also lead to an increase in urinary frequency and incontinence, especially in the elderly. “It really depends on the point a person is at in developing diabetes, and what level of [blood sugar] control they have,” says Dr. Bloomgarden. If diabetes goes untreated or if it has been poorly controlled for a long time, you can develop se Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination?

How Can Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination?

How can diabetes cause frequent urination? Frequent urination with an abnormally large amount of urine is often an early symptom of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This happens because the body tries to rid itself of unused glucose through the urine. International Painful Bladder Foundation: "The Urinary Tract and How It Works." MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination." American Diabetes Association: "Dropping Insulin to Drop Pounds." March of Dimes: "Changes During Pregnancy" National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia." National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Interstitial Cystitis/ Painful Bladder Syndrome." University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority: "After a Stroke, Managing Your Bladder." MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination." MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Urinalysis." WebMD Information and Resources: "Cystoscopy." National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures." The American Heritage Medical Dictionary, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007. National Center of Biotechnology Information: "Comparing Drugs for Overactive Bladder Syndrome." National Association for Continence: "Overactive Bladder Syndrome." Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

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