diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Upper Back Pain

Diabetes Back Pain

Diabetes Back Pain

Diabetes back pain is always a possible source of symptoms for patients who suffer from chronic blood sugar concerns. Diabetes is a major health threat which has reached stellar proportions in the developed world, mostly due to a less active lifestyle combined with a fatty diet. Obesity is the major cause for most adult diabetes and that is a shame, since the condition is completely preventable with a bit of education and effort. Unfortunately, once most patients realize the danger of their lifestyle choices, it is far too late. Many doctors cite diabetes as one of the most significant health threats of our time, with more and more cases being diagnosed every year. Diabetes Back Pain Information 1 1 Trick to Calm Nerves Escape neuropathy symptoms fast Soothe nerves with this quick trick nervestra.com 2 Sciatica Pain Relief Act Now. IntelliSpine℠: More Precise, Faster Recovery. Medicare Not Accepted. NorthAmericanSpine.com Diabetes causes nerve pain due to increased glucose in the blood. The presence of high glucose levels attack the structural integrity of nerves, causing a frightening variety of possible symptoms including weakness, tingling, numbness and of course, pain. The majority of diabetic sufferers experience these painful issues in their extremities, in either the hands or feet. However, symptoms can exist virtually anywhere and cause truly nightmarish conditions for some patients to bear. The technical medical term for this health issue is diabetic neuropathy, but most patients simply call it what it feels like… Hell on Earth! Worse still, these types of pain conditions are notoriously difficult to treat, since they tend to resist many pharmaceutical products and do not respond to surgery. Diabetes Back Pain Concerns Diabetes usually attacks peripheral ne Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Low Back Pain In Diabetes Mellitus And Importance Of Preventive Approach

Low Back Pain In Diabetes Mellitus And Importance Of Preventive Approach

Go to: Background: Musculoskeletal pain is known to be a common problem in diabetic patients. In spite of this fact, there is little information about epidemiology aspect of Low Back Pain (LBP) and necessity of taking preventive approach in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of LBP in diabetic patients and its comparison with non-diabetic subjects. Methods: Low back pain frequency was examined among 317 diabetic patients referred to endocrine clinic, Sina Hospital, Tabriz city, Iran during 3 months interval. The control group included 100 participants who were parents of students of Tabriz University. All participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire including Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Face Pain Scale (FPS). Result: Of the 317 diabetic patients, 63.4% (201) reported LBP while in non-diabetic group was 47% (47).The average functional disability in diabetic group was 9 while in control group was 7. Inter-correlation between low back pain intensity scale and functional disability were significant (r=0.52, P<0.01). Discussion: Low back pain is a common problem in diabetic patients in terms of intensity, frequency and functional level of disability. Keywords: Low back pain, Diabetes mellitus, Disability Continue reading >>

Back Pain | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Back Pain | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi all...I have one question which may be general. Actually I am software engineer and I have to work 10 to 12 hours sitting. So my back pain is increasing . I wanna suggestion how can I stop my back pain. I did all types of medication, but belive does not affect to my back pain...help. Might be worth trying to go and see a physio. I'm a sysadmin / engineer so spend a good chunck of time as a keyboard too and did used to have similar problems. In my case the problem was not actually my back but what I was doing with my feet and legs. A little bit of exercise and a change to how I sit and now all is good.. and no pills either When you are sitting on an armchair or sofa at home, try putting a rolled up towel in the small of your back for support. Oddly my back pain is made worse when I sit in a comfy sofa or chair, and feels better when I sit at a dining chair or the office chair we have in front of the PC. I've been through pretty much all the drugs, a year of physio, an 8 week back rehab course and getting on for 10 months under the pain clinic and nothing really worked for me with the exception of Gabapentin which worked so well I suffered ID. Now I use a re usable hot gel pad on my lower back and a lumber support belt like a weight lifter would use for several hours a day and that seems to be the best relief I could find. I did think about trying one of those chair back massagers with various massage modes but 10 minutes in a shop doesnt give you a decent feel of whether it would work, I'd be interested to hear if anyone else has tried one? Before my accident i suffered with back pain most of my life Heavy Job I tried everything under the sun until Continue reading >>

Mapping The Association Between Back Pain And Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-sectional And Longitudinal Study Of Adult Spanish Twins

Mapping The Association Between Back Pain And Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-sectional And Longitudinal Study Of Adult Spanish Twins

Abstract Back pain and type 2 diabetes often co-occur, resulting in greater impact on people’s health and complexity in their care. Plausible causal mechanisms for this association have been proposed, yet the nature of the link remains unclear. We therefore explored the direction of the association between type 2 diabetes and chronic back pain in twins, controlling for genetics and early environmental confounding. 2,096 and 1,098 twins were included in the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, respectively. Any or severe (≥ 9) low back pain (LBP), neck pain (NP), and spinal pain (concurrent LBP and NP) and type 2 diabetes were investigated. Sequential analyses were performed using logistic regression. Firstly, twins were analysed unpaired (adjusted age and gender): total sample analyses. Then, to control for genetic and shared environmental factors, a co-twin case-control analysis was performed including monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs discordant for back pain (cross-sectional only). In the cross-sectional total sample analyses, type 2 diabetes was associated with chronic spinal pain (OR 1.61; 95%CI 1.12 to 2.31), severe chronic spinal pain (OR 3.33; 95%CI 1.47 to 7.53), chronic NP (OR 1.37; 95%CI 1.01 to 1.85), severe chronic NP (OR 2.28; 95%CI 1.24 to 4.21), and severe chronic LBP (OR 1.63; 95%CI 1.00 to 2.64). After further adjustment for genetic and shared environmental factors, none of the associations remained significant. The longitudinal analyses indicated that the presence of type 2 diabetes did not increase the risk of future back pain, or vice-versa, after two to four years. Chronic back pain (spinal pain, NP, or LBP) was associated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Associations are stronger for severe cases of pain. Future research should Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetes can harm your nerves. That damage, called neuropathy, may be painful. It can happen in several ways, and they all seem to be related to blood sugar levels being too high for too long. To prevent it, work with your doctor to manage your blood sugar. You may hear your doctor mention the four types of diabetes-related neuropathy: peripheral, autonomic, proximal, and focal. Peripheral Neuropathy This type usually affects the feet and legs. Rare cases affect the arms, abdomen, and back. Symptoms include: Tingling Numbness (which may become permanent) Burning (especially in the evening) Pain Early symptoms usually get better when your blood sugar is under control. There are medications to help manage the discomfort. What you should do: Check your feet and legs daily. Use lotion on your feet if they're dry. Take care of your toenails. Ask your doctor if you should go to a podiatrist. Wear shoes that fit well. Wear them all the time, so your feet don't get injured. Autonomic Neuropathy This type usually affects the digestive system, especially the stomach. It can also affect the blood vessels, urinary system, and sex organs. In your digestive system: Symptoms include: Bloating Diarrhea Constipation Heartburn Nausea Vomiting Feeling full after small meals What you should do: You may need to eat smaller meals and take medication to treat it. In blood vessels: Symptoms include: Blacking out when you stand up quickly Faster heartbeat Dizziness Low blood pressure Nausea Vomiting Feeling full sooner than normal If you have it: Avoid standing up too quickly. You may also need to wear special stockings (ask your doctor about them) and take medicine. In Men: Symptoms include: He may not be able to have or keep an erection, or he may have “dry” or reduced ejaculations. What Continue reading >>

Managing Chronic Pain

Managing Chronic Pain

Pain affects millions of people with diabetes. For most of these people, the pain is chronic, defined as pain persisting for more than six months, experienced almost every day, and of moderate to severe intensity, or that significantly interferes with daily activities. In some cases, a person’s pain is clearly related to complications of diabetes; in other cases, it is not. Regardless of the cause, however, studies show that chronic pain makes diabetes self-management much more difficult and often leads to higher blood glucose levels. Surveys of people with diabetes report rates of chronic pain anywhere from 20% to over 60% – much higher than rates in the general population. The types of pain most often reported by people with diabetes include back pain and neuropathy pain in the feet or hands. (Peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the feet and hands, is a common complication of diabetes.) Headaches and other pain sites are also frequently reported. Many people with diabetes also have arthritis, fibromyalgia (an arthritis-related illness that causes widespread muscle and joint pain and fatigue), or other painful conditions. Pain has been shown to interfere with self-management activities, sleep, physical functioning, work, family relationships, mood, and quality of life. To make matters worse, pain is often invisible to others, so family members, coworkers, and health-care professionals often have no idea what a person in pain is going through. Many people feel that their physicians don’t understand and tell them they “just have to live with it.” Why is there so much pain, and what can be done about it? Acute versus chronic pain When speaking of pain, it’s important to understand the difference between acute and chronic pain. Acute pain is what a person Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Upper Back Pain

Diabetes-related Causes Of Upper Back Pain

Diabetes-related causes of Upper back pain Our information shows that 2causes of Upper back pain are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 20total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Upper back pain if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. The full list of all possible causes for Upper back pain described in various sources is as follows: See full list of possible disease causes of Upper back pain Conditions listing medical symptoms: Upper back pain: The following list of conditionshave ' Upper back pain ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Upper back pain or choose View All. By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use . Continue reading >>

Could My Borderline Diabetes Cause Nerve Pain In My Upper Back?

Could My Borderline Diabetes Cause Nerve Pain In My Upper Back?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

The Musculoskeletal Effects Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae, with Type-2 DM representing the most common form of the disease. Neuromusculoskeletal sequelae of DM are common and the practicing chiropractor should be alert to these conditions, as some are manageable in a chiropractic office, while others are life and/or limb threatening. This paper reviews the effects of DM on the musculoskeletal system so as assist the chiropractor in making appropriate clinical decisions regarding therapy, understanding contraindications to therapy, referring patients to medical physicians when appropriate and understanding the impact that DM may have on the prognosis for their patients suffering from the myriad musculoskeletal conditions associated with this disease. Keywords: diabetes, musculoskeletal, chiropractic Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-system disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia that has both acute and chronic biochemical and anatomical sequelae. It is thought to affect almost 17 million Americans, only 11 million of whom have been diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association. In type 1 diabetes, a lack of insulin results in poor carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. Insulin is functionally absent, typically due to immune-mediated destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas, though other etiologies of beta cell destruction have also been implicated, including drugs, chemicals, viruses, mitochondrial gene defects, pancreatectomy and ionizing radiation.1 Type 1 DM (DM1) occurs most commonly in juveniles. It can occur in adults, especially in those in their late 30s and early 40s. Unlike people with Type 2 DM ( Continue reading >>

Low Back Pain At Presentation In A Newly Diagnosed Diabetic

Low Back Pain At Presentation In A Newly Diagnosed Diabetic

Patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are generally more susceptible to infections, which can cause hyperglycaemia and trigger diabetic ketoacidosis.1 In many cases, the focus of infection, such as the urinary or respiratory tract, may be apparent at presentation. Occasionally, however, patients can present with unusual foci of infection and vague clinical symptoms and signs. Both epidural2–5 and psoas6,7 abscesses have been reported in diabetics, but mainly in adults with longstanding disease. Presentation with an epidural abscess and psoas abscess in the same patient is extremely rare in adults, particularly at first presentation of IDDM,2 and, to our knowledge, has not been reported in children. CASE REPORT A 12 year old boy of mixed race (White/Afro-Caribbean) presented to casualty with a three day history of central abdominal pain, vomiting, lethargy, and low back pain, followed by a five hour history of difficulty in breathing. There was no previous history of respiratory problems, polyuria, polydipsia, or weight loss. His past medical history was unremarkable with normal development and no previous acute hospital admissions. On examination, he was 10% dehydrated with cold peripheries, dry mucous membranes, sunken eyes, and reduced skin turgor. He had Kussmaul breathing, with a respiratory rate of 60 breaths per minute, but good bilateral air entry on auscultation and no wheeze or crackles. There was no lymphadenopathy but he was noted to be anaemic. Axillary temperature was 36.0°C on admission. His heart rate was regular at 120 per minute with a blood pressure of 130/70 mm Hg. He had mild central abdominal pain with no hepatosplenomegaly. Examination of the spine revealed mild tenderness on palpation over the upper lumbar spine, but peripher Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

May 18, 2011 at 07:47 | Report abuse | Reply Heather, I have had tremendous success dealing with my sleep-related fatigue problems (non-restorative sleep) and significantly reduced my fibromyalgia by taking a low dose (30mg to 40mg) of desipramine just before bedtime. Desipramine is a low dose antidepressant and been in use for years. I have been using it for the last 18 years with great success. Your symptoms sound exactly like mine just before I started this treatment. Just a suggestion. It is important to note that at its early stages, diabetes does not cause many symptoms and may pass unnoticed. But the disease develops silently, causing damage to eyesight, kidneys and the cardiovascular system. PS – men can also have fibromyalgia. It is either underdiagnosed (possibly) or may be more common in women. I know a few men who have been diagnosed. Not enough is known about it to make the assumption that it doesn't occur more often (than diagnosed) in men. May 18, 2011 at 07:51 | Report abuse | Reply I am in the Marine Corps and need to run atleast 3 milesbut can't run 1/2 mile anymore. I am on a Beta blocker for chest pain and atrial tach. I lift weights and I try to run but have a shortness of breath while attempting to run, yard work, and walking up one flight of stairs. Cardiologist says all is good with my heart no obstructions. What else could be causing my shortness of breath. May 18, 2011 at 08:05 | Report abuse | Reply Have you been to a cardiologist who ran a stress-test scan on your heart? That particular test lets the examiner look at your hear function under duress. Your problem may be respiratory-related, maybe you should see a pneumologist, as compromized lung function may tax your heart and give you chest pain. Also, you might want to lay off the weight Continue reading >>

Upper Back Pain | Help! I Have Diabetes...

Upper Back Pain | Help! I Have Diabetes...

Despite the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, causing death and forcing the evacuation of so many, including my daughter and her family, plus the seriousness of world events and the Presidential election, physically I feel terrific. My body joy is linked to a cleansing of my liver. Bizarre, indeed, but quite miraculous. Imagine your liver, this teeny organ responsible for purifying the sludge that accumulates in our bodies, filling up , and patiently waiting for us to flush it clean. According to Dr. Clark, cleaning the liver helps digestion (my goal), but also diminishes gallstones, improves energy, should, upper arm and upper back pain. Sounds impossible, but after seven years of doing these flushes, I can testify stuff comes out, stones covered with bile (the gallstones). What I know is after each cleanse, I am calmer, energized and my blood sugars go normal. Its like magic, only its concrete and natural. I encourage any of you to test it out. Check it out online. Note, I had not done this flush for over a year, but some times, I have done it seasonally. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes