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Diabetes Uk Press Release

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

The information on this page is for people with diabetes. It includes media coverage and academic papers on the low calorie diet, as well as case studies and sample meal plans. Download the Diabetes Reversal Information(PDF: 543KB). Watch Professor Taylor's Newcastle University Public Lecture on reversing type 2 diabetes (4th November 2014). Read Richard Doughty's personal story Type 2 diabetes and the diet that cured me on the Guardian website, including a video interview of another personal story. You can also read an update from Richard, I reversed my diabetes in just 11 days, on the Mail Online. Get sample recipes and meal plans (PDF: 385KB) devised by Karen Heron, a dietician at Newcastle Diabetes Centre. More information on low calorie diets is available from the Diabetes UK website and the British Heart Foundation provide advice on weight loss. Information for your doctor It is important that you discuss the management of your diabetes with your own doctor. It will take years for this new knowledge to become incorporated into textbooks and guidelines, so your doctor may be wary of information from the internet. Therefore, here are some notes for you to take to your doctor. Download our information sheet for doctors on the Information for Doctors (PDF: 227KB). Further information DiRECT results: The DiRECT Results‌ (PDF: 627KB) full paper and the online DiRECT Appendix (PDF: 499KB) are now available. These files are of the final manuscripts as copyright prevents posting of the Lancet paper itself. Academic papers and data: Media coverage and press releases: the press release for the original trial (October 2015) the Food Hospital (Channel 4) the press release for Fixing Dad (July 2016) the press release that Type 2 Diabetes is reversible (September 2017) Further Continue reading >>

Welcome To Sanofi

Welcome To Sanofi

Sanofi UK News and Press Room The Sanofi UK Press Office provides a 24-hour media information service 365 days a year, via a dedicated phone line - 0845 372 6263. Duty press officers operate outside normal office hours. Requests for quotes on company-specific or healthcare-related industry topics are dealt with within appropriate deadlines. An official response from the relevant company spokesperson is usually provided within 24 hours or sooner to meet press deadlines. All queries addressed to the press office are answered promptly, and any additional data or research that may be required is normally supplied within 24 hours. Very rare disease treatment Cerdelga® ▼ (eliglustat) will be made available in Scotland for Gaucher patients • The oral pill offers Gaucher patients and their physicians an alternative to current standard of care delivered by IV infusion • Gaucher disease is an inherited, incurable condition that can lead to enlargement of the spleen and liver, pain, bone damage among other symptoms • The positive decision means NHS Scotland is aligned with NHS England in funding eliglustat, reducing potential disparities in care NICE Recommends Sanofi’s Kevzara®▼ (sarilumab) for the Treatment of Severe, Active Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) • NICE publishes final guidance recommending Kevzara® (sarilumab) as an option for treating adults with active, severe rheumatoid arthritis who respond inadequately to intensive therapy with conventional or other disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) • RA is a progressive, chronic disease, most common in people aged 30-50 years1 • 75% of patients diagnosed while of working age2 Over half (51.4%) of those in the under 65 clinical at-risk groups did not get vaccinated against the flu virus in 2016/20171, Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Way To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Best Way To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Most people have arrived at the state of Type 2 Diabetes because of three factors: 1) Their pancreas has max’ed out on insulin production (usually after increasing insulin production >800%) and the beta cells are in a state of exhaustion, bordering on literal suicide. 2) The adipose tissue mass, especially in the abdomen has increased, developed insulin resistance and is now chronically inflamed by a deficiency of Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and similar cytokines. 3) Deconditioned muscles no longer properly process fats and sugars, are among the organs with insulin resistance. Note I did not say they have been overeating, because there is no reason to rehash the obvious and give an answer which is doesn’t add much to our understanding or historically useful action. How to best fix the system? Fix the largest (potential) metabolic organ in the body - skeletal muscle. Eating small meals is like attempting to tiptoe around the sleeping lion, a temporizing method at best. Bariatric surgery violates Loeb’s Law (Don’t let the surgeon get ahold of your patient ;-)) but seriously has a significant ten-year failure rate and low calorie diet alone contradicts a millennium of evolved metabolic, self-preservation mechanisms. There are three mutually prongs to the best strategy: Diet (Low carbohydrate, possibly with higher fat versus protein) Aerobic exercise Progressive weight training There is plenty of research supporting this including the ADA’s website. If you wish to see a video explaining the scientific basis, check out this YouTube video by yours truly: With Type 2 Diabetes, A Randomized Controlled Trial JAMA. 2010;304(20):2253-2262 Continue reading >>

Urban Kids In Diabetes Timebomb

Urban Kids In Diabetes Timebomb

NEWS - PRESS RELEASES Survey results released today show that children living in inner city areas are at a hugely increased risk of becoming obese and developing Type 2 diabetes. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Leicester, shows that only 37 per cent of children in an urban area walked to school, compared to 67 per cent of suburban children in a previous study Inactive lifestyles can increase the likelihood of obesity and contribute to the development of Type 2 diabetes. The study, presented today at the Diabetes UK Annual Professional Conference, also showed that 47 per cent of pupils who responded to the survey admitted to spending more than four hours per day watching television or videos or playing computer games. 86 per cent of the children surveyed were from South Asian backgrounds. People from South Asian communities are up to six times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes and have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The lack of physical activity is an important factor in contributing further risk. Lead researcher Dr Kamlesh Khunti, from the University of Leicester said, “With this study we wanted to look at the characteristics of children who live a sedentary lifestyle and the impact of demographics on their health. It is quite clear that children living in urban areas are not doing enough exercise. These dire levels of physical activity in urban youngsters need to be addressed, particularly with South Asian children who we know are already more genetically prone to obesity, cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes.” The research was presented today at the Diabetes UK Annual Professional Conference in Birmingham. The survey was conducted in five inner-city schools in a deprived area of Leicester with 3150 pupil Continue reading >>

How Do Pharmaceutical Companies Balance Ethics And Making Profits When Pricing A Drug?

How Do Pharmaceutical Companies Balance Ethics And Making Profits When Pricing A Drug?

They usually don't if they can get away with not appearing to be unethical. The balance is usually tilted towards making profits rather than being ethical. Pharmaceutical companies are driven by profits and I doubt anyone would dispute that. No company would invest billions of dollars in R & D out of the goodness of their heart. Profit is important. But question here is how much is too much and is there an ethical basis for governments to control drug pricing? The American way to look at the pharmaceutical industry is the way Ayn Rand would look at any profit driven business- one with objectivity. I'm not quite sure that attitude works well in medicine. This same attitude is making the Americans pay among the highest among all countries around the world for medicines which were first developed in US itself. But this same attitude unfortunately affects the rest of the world as well. Here's why- In a typical market the price of a product is decided by the compromise between the margins for the seller and the amount the buyer is willing to pay. This dynamic usually controls the pricing to acceptable levels in accordance with the necessity for the buyer. In this pricing dynamic the buyer and the seller have an almost equal say in the matter. If the price quoted is higher than what the buyer is willing to pay then the buyer will refuse to buy. This is not the case with medicine. If the drug company (seller) produces a drug and fixes a price, the patients/insurance companies (buyer) have to cough up the amount since the alternative is sometimes death or other adverse events like blindness,sickness, pain etc. The buyer here does not have the same leverage that the seller has. Unless the insurance companies can negotiate a good deal by promising volumes for a drug, the drug com Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk - The Food You Love, But Healthier

Diabetes Uk - The Food You Love, But Healthier

A major new campaign has being launched by Diabetes UK this week which aims to get people thinking healthily and creatively in the kitchen. The campaign, called The Food You Love, will shine the spotlight on five people who have not let living with diabetes become a barrier to their love of cooking or to enjoying delicious meals. Over the course of the campaign, they will share their healthy versions of some of the nation’s favourite recipes like fish and chips and apple strudel. Alongside these recipes and video tutorials, people who sign up will also receive healthy eating tips, meal planners and more, to help you enjoy the food you love, only healthier. Bob Swindell is one of the stars of the campaign and became a champion of healthy eating after being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Since his diagnosis, he has lost more than 50kg through healthy eating and a new found love of running - which has seen him compete in several marathons and even begin training to become an England Athletics coach. "I wasn’t prepared for how much I would enjoy cooking" Asked about his motivation for auditioning for the campaign, Bob said: “Before my diagnosis, I didn’t really think too much about what I was eating. Although I enjoyed my food, I tended to prioritise convenience and that meant I didn’t cook that many meals from scratch. “This all changed when I received my diagnosis because I was forced to start thinking more carefully about what I was eating. What I wasn’t prepared for was how much I would enjoy cooking and how straightforward it was to make healthier eating choices.” “I am thrilled to be taking part in this campaign because I want to help to deliver the message that eating healthily doesn’t mean you have to give up the food you love. Managing the cond Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Pill ‘improves Blood Sugar Control’

Type 2 Diabetes Pill ‘improves Blood Sugar Control’

Issued by University of Leicester on 17 October 2017 A Type 2 diabetes pill taken once a day has been shown to ‘significantly’ improve the health of people with the condition, according to new research. In a major study, research led by Professor Melanie Davies CBE of the Leicester Diabetes Centre found that semaglutide taken orally lowered HbA1c, a measurement of blood glucose over three months, by up to 1.9 per cent and also aided weight loss. Although there are several Type 2 diabetes treatments currently available, many of them come with greater risks of developing low blood sugar, a condition known as hypoglycaemia, as well as weight gain. But up to 90 per cent of patients receiving oral semaglutide achieved the target HbA1c level of less than 7 per cent and 71 per cent experienced meaningful weight loss, the research published by the prestigious journal JAMA found. Semaglutide is a glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, a relatively new group of injectable drugs, but it can also be taken orally and this study explored the effectiveness of its pill form. Semaglutide works by stimulating insulin production and suppressing the secretion of the glucose-raising hormone glucagon as well as lowering appetite. The trial involved 632 people with Type 2 diabetes randomly selected to take either semaglutide orally or as an injectable or a placebo across 26 weeks. The researchers found that average change in HbA1c from baseline to week 26 decreased with oral semaglutide (dosage-dependent range, -0.7 percent to -1.9 percent) and subcutaneous semaglutide (-1.9 percent) and placebo (-0.3 percent). From an average baseline HbA1c level of 7.9 per cent, between 44 per cent (2.5-mg group) and 90 percent (40-mg standard escalation group) of patients receiving oral semaglutide Continue reading >>

Thousands Of People Set To Access Diabetes And Obesity Prevention Services Through The Touch Of A Button

Thousands Of People Set To Access Diabetes And Obesity Prevention Services Through The Touch Of A Button

NHS England, Public Health England and Diabetes UK have teamed up with leading companies from the tech sector as the battle against obesity and Type 2 diabetes goes digital. More than 5,000 people are expected to benefit from a pilot project, which will see five companies and eight areas of the country test drive a range of apps, gadgets, wristbands and other innovative digital products, which starts this month. Users will be able to access health coaches and online support groups as well as set and monitor goals electronically. Some patients will also receive wearable technology, to help them monitor activity levels and receive motivational messages and prompts, which is being made available on the NHS for the first time. This online method of receiving support has the potential to have a similar impact to face-to-face interventions – helping bring down high blood sugar levels and in turn prevent or delay onset of Type 2 diabetes. Heathier You: The NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme was officially launched last year to support people who are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Those referred on to the face-to-face programme get tailored, personalised help, this includes; education on lifestyle choices, advice on how to reduce weight through healthier eating and bespoke physical activity programmes, which together have been proven to reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. This new pilot offers similar support, assistance and guidance but through the use of the new digital interventions. Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England, said “So much else in our lives is now about online social connection and support, and that now needs to be true too for the modern NHS. This new programme is the latest example of how the NHS is now getting practical and Continue reading >>

Press Release – People Living With Diabetes Benefit From Watching Films Online

Press Release – People Living With Diabetes Benefit From Watching Films Online

The PocketMedic films were ‘prescribed’ to people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, alongside standard treatments, by a GP or practice nurse. After just 3-months, routine tests showed a clinically significant improvement in HbA1c – an established marker of diabetes control. Swansea University’s Professor Jeffrey W Stephens, consultant physician at Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, said, “These results are highly encouraging. One in four patients watched at least one PocketMedic film and these film-watchers demonstrated that, as a result, they were better able to manage their condition.” Self-management skills are widely recognised as an increasingly important treatment that can have a major effect on an individual’s quality of life. Yet less than 1 in 100 people typically choose to attend an educational programme that can, potentially, prevent them from developing blindness, kidney failure, amputation or other health complication. During the study, there were eleven films in the PocketMedic ‘Living with diabetes’ series including: What is diabetes? What can I eat? Diabetes and weight, Looking after your feet, Stopping smoking, Medication and monitoring, Jill’s story, Jeff’s story and Tony and Michelle’s story. Swansea University’s Dr Sam Rice, a consultant physician at Hywel Dda University Health Board, explained, “Digital prescriptions encourage people to access expert health information, practical advice and emotional support from the comfort of their own home. Each motivational film can be watched by patients and carers as many times as required and, crucially, at a time when the individual faces a new health challenge.” PocketMedic is the brainchild of Kimberley Littlemore, co-founder and creative director of eHealth D Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk Case Study – Prime Contracting In North East Essex

Diabetes Uk Case Study – Prime Contracting In North East Essex

From everybody at the NEEDS team, we would like to wish our patients, staff members and partners a very Merry Chris… 1 week ago Continue reading >>

Cambridge Weight Plan Used In Ground-breaking Diabetes Remission Trial

Cambridge Weight Plan Used In Ground-breaking Diabetes Remission Trial

A landmark trial funded by Diabetes UK has shown that it is possible to put Type 2 diabetes into remission using an intensive low calorie formula diet-based weight management programme. The trial, called DiRECT (Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial), is a two-year study aimed at finding an effective and accessible way to put Type 2 diabetes into remission. To do this the trial used the Counterweight Plus weight management programme whose low calorie formula diet products were supplied by Cambridge Weight Plan. The results from DiRECT show that almost half (45.6%) of all those who took part in the programme were in remission after 12 months. Nine out of ten participants who lost more than 15kg put their condition into remission and over half (57%) of those who lost 10 to 15kg achieved remission (along with a third (34%) who lost five to 10kg). Only 4% of the control group achieved remission. The first year findings of the study suggest that Type 2 diabetes remission is closely linked to significant weight loss. Of the 298 people who took part in the trial, half received standard diabetes care from their GP, whilst the other half received Counterweight Plus structured weight management programme within primary care. The programme included a 800kcal a day, low calorie, nutrient-complete formula diet supplied by Cambridge Weight Plan for three to five months, food reintroduction and long-term support to maintain weight loss. Professor Anthony Leeds who is Medical Director of Cambridge Weight Plan said: “I’m very impressed by the evidence showing that large weight losses using formula diets can be achieved and maintained in people with diabetes and other conditions such as heart disease, and obstructive sleep apnoea. People who lose weight with formula diet programmes often Continue reading >>

[add Hospital] Encourages People Who Experience Day- Or Night-time Hypos To

[add Hospital] Encourages People Who Experience Day- Or Night-time Hypos To

Hypos occur when glucose in the blood falls to a low level, and symptoms can include a pounding heart, trembling, hunger, difficulty concentrating and blurred vision.[endnoteRef:3] Symptoms of night-time hypos include waking up with a morning headache, night sweats and extreme tiredness.[endnoteRef:4] Night-time hypos can be of particular concern as they can be unpredictable and hard to detect.[endnoteRef:5] [3: WebMD. Available at: Last accessed August 2015. ] [4: Diabetes.co.uk. Nocturnal Hypoglycemia - Night Time Hypos. Available at: www.diabetes.co.uk/nocturnal-hypoglycemia.html. Last accessed September 2015.] [5: Brunton SA. Nocturnal hypoglycaemia: answering the challenge with long-acting insulin analogs. MedGenMed 2007;9(2):38. ] Night-time hypos have a significant impact on the lives of people living with diabetes and the survey showed that they can lead to absenteeism from work (21%), a loss of productivity at work (12%) and a reduced desire to socialise (13%) and exercise (12%).1 Almost half of people (47%) reported that their sleep had been affected by night-time hypos, and one quarter (25%) of people are scared of being alone when experiencing a night-time hypo.1 Simon O’Neill, Director of Health Intelligence for Diabetes UK, said, “We encourage all people with diabetes to remember the simple TALK Hypos message and to take steps to better manage their day- and night-time hypos. These steps can include simple changes to lifestyle, diet and treatment so it is very important to discuss hypos as part of the regular consultation with your doctor or nurse.†TALK Hypos is an awareness campaign from Novo Nordisk, supported by Diabetes UK. It provides an acronym to encourage people with diabetes to discuss hypos with their doctor or nurse: · THINK Continue reading >>

Bivda And Diabetes Uk Call For Urgent Action On Blood Glucose Monitoring

Bivda And Diabetes Uk Call For Urgent Action On Blood Glucose Monitoring

The British In Vitro Diagnostics Association (BIVDA) and Diabetes UK are calling for healthcare professionals (HCPs) to take urgent action and check their patients’ blood glucose meter systems for compliance ahead of the implementation of ISO Standard 15197: 2013 in May. To help ensure the accuracy and consistency of results for people with diabetes, revisions have been made to the ISO 15197: 2013 Standard for blood glucose monitoring. The revised standard will come into effect in May and as a result, some meter systems may be rendered non-compliant. Up to a third of people diagnosed with diabetes are expected to be affected by the changes. As test strips will become unavailable for non-compliant meter systems, it is vital that HCPs check their patients’ meters and if necessary, upgrade them. BIVDA has provided guidance for HCPs which outlines some of the changes to the revised ISO 15197: 2013 Standard and how to check if a meter system is compliant. BIVDA’s Chief Executive, Doris-Ann Williams MBE, said: “With the implementation deadline rapidly approaching, BIVDA is reminding HCPs to check their patients’ meter systems for compliance. If meter systems are not upgraded, individuals may find themselves unable to monitor their blood glucose as test strips may become unavailable for non-compliant meter systems. “We strongly encourage HCPs to read our guidance and take action now to help ensure a smooth transition for patients”. Simon O’Neill, Director of Health Intelligence and Professional Liaison at Diabetes UK, said: “For people with diabetes, monitoring their blood glucose levels is key to them managing their condition well." “It is therefore critical that healthcare professionals make their patients aware of the changes being made to the ISO 15197 Continue reading >>

Clinicians Launch Campaign To Raise Awareness Of Diabetes

Clinicians Launch Campaign To Raise Awareness Of Diabetes

Clinicians across Suffolk and north east Essex are launching a campaign in order to improve awareness of diabetes. Around 48,000 people across the two areas currently live with the condition, which if not managed correctly can result in serious health complications such as blindness, kidney failure, stroke and loss of limbs. The campaign – called ‘Let’s Beat Diabetes Together’ – has been launched to mark World Diabetes Day on Tuesday 14th November 2017. It aims to help people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes manage their health better. Health chiefs also aim to educate the wider public about how they can help prevent developing type 2 diabetes in the first place by making modest adjustments to their lifestyles and diets. According to the charity Diabetes UK, the cost to the nation associated with treating diabetes currently stands at £23.7 billion-a-year. That figure is expected to almost double over the next 20 years. Professor Gerry Rayman, Senior Diabetologist and lead of diabetes research at Ipswich Hospital’s Diabetes Centre, said: “Diabetes is fast becoming the biggest health threat in the UK and can reduce life expectancy. “However, if managed correctly, many people can go on to lead happy and independent lives without developing these complications.” Professor Rayman, who is also an adviser to Diabetes UK and Clinical Lead in Diabetes for NHS Improvement’s national diabetes improvement initiative GIRFT (Getting It Right First Time), advised people with diabetes to undergo regular checks to ensure they are controlling their condition. He said: “They should monitor their cholesterol, blood pressure and kidney function to ensure they are kept at safe levels to avoid future complications. “It is essential that everyone living with diabet Continue reading >>

Fear And Shame Leading To People With Type 2 Diabetes Risking Future Life Threatening Conditions

Fear And Shame Leading To People With Type 2 Diabetes Risking Future Life Threatening Conditions

New campaign launches to highlight how emotional and psychological factors are impacting effective diabetes management Guildford, United Kingdom – 14 November 2016 – Sanofi today announced that new research reveals that negative emotions are jeopardising people living with Type 2 (T2) diabetes’* ability to effectively manage their condition. A quarter of people with T2 diabetes feel anxious or fearful about getting ‘hypos’ (low blood glucose levels), with 42% preferring to have high blood glucose levels instead of risking another ‘hypo’, despite this risking life threatening conditions in the future.1 *Please note that all references in the press release to ‘people with type 2 diabetes’ refer only to those who are diagnosed and on insulin The UK has the worst T2 diabetes blood glucose levels in Europe2, so Sanofi is launching a new campaign dedicated to helping patients - ‘Highs & Lows: Better Balance for a Better Future’, that includes a Sanofi sponsored patient support website, to help the 52% of patients with T2 diabetes who find it challenging to balance their blood glucose levels or who worry about doing so.1 Another Sanofi-funded study conducted in UK adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and published in the journal Diabetic Medicine, showed even modest and sustained improvement in blood glucose control could help prevent almost a million serious medical complications such as eye disease, kidney disease, foot ulcer and amputations, and potentially blindness, which could avoid billions in future NHS costs.3 Dr Max Pemberton, GP and Psychiatrist at St Anne’s Hospital, London explains: “This research shows that people with T2 diabetes are making fear-driven decisions in the ‘here and now’ to prevent low blood glucose levels, without co Continue reading >>

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