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Diabetes Trials

4 Promising New And Upcoming Clinical Trials For Type 1 Diabetes

4 Promising New And Upcoming Clinical Trials For Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes is a disease where your own immune system mistakenly attack your “pancreatic islets”- small clusters of cells in the pancreas that contain insulin-producing “beta” cells. There is currently no cure for Type 1 Diabetes, although it can be managed. Type 1 diabetics must carefully time when and what they eat, monitor their blood glucose by pricking their fingers, and routinely inject themselves with insulin. This life-long struggle can be very annoying for patients. Furthermore, even with careful management, long-term complications generally develop over time. These complications include kidney failure, damage to the retina, heart disease, and foot ulcers. This highlights the need to find better ways to manage the disease. In this article, we have summarised 4 clinical trials for Type 1 Diabetes. We explain the scientific reasoning behind each treatment and what the current findings are (including any potential side effects). NOTE: We did not receive any money from any of the following companies to write this article, nor did they ask us to publicise them. The trials are here because they stemmed from solid scientific research. Before taking any actions, please consult your healthcare provider to determine whether or not you might benefit from these treatments. 1) The “T-Rex” study (T-regulatory cell therapy), Caladrius Biosciences, USA What is the scientific basis of the study? The name of the clinical trial is a pun on T-regs, short for “T-Regulatory cells”, which are a type of white blood cells involved in your immune system. T-regs distinguish which cells are harmful to your body, and which cells are not. So, they are crucial in preventing your immune system from mistakenly destroying your own healthy cells. As mentioned earlier, this is Continue reading >>

Diabetes Research | Diabetes Victoria

Diabetes Research | Diabetes Victoria

Order cookbooks, publications, diabetes supplies and more... First time shoppers need to sign up to view and order products Join us in supporting, empowering and campaigning for all Victorians affected by diabetes. Our members make more possible. Please login to enjoy your exclusive member area! If this is your first visit, you need to reset your password OR register your email address below. Not a member? JOIN NOW to accessexclusive member benefits! Having trouble? Visit our Online Help section Choose a category of diabetes research on the right. Diabetes Victoria provides this information as a service to the community and it is the responsibility of the individual to determine the appropriateness of participating in a study. Diabetes Victoria does not take any responsibility whatsoever arising out of individuals participating in a study and recommend them to seek their own advice from their ususal medical practitioner or any other appropriate source deemed necessary before consenting to participate. Diabetes clinical trials are an essential part of the development of new interventions and tests that may help to improve your diabetes or improve the health care of others. As a consumer you might be interested to know information about: The Australian Clinical Trials website contains general information that addresses all of these questions about clinical trials in Australia. Clinical Trials Connect : Clinical Trials Connect Pty Ltd (CTC) is an online patient recruitment service designed to help people interested in volunteering for medical research find clinical trials that are relevant to them. Australian Clinical Trials : This website aims to provide reliable and up-to-date information and advice about clinical trials in Australia. It provides easy to understand info Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials For Diabetes

Clinical Trials For Diabetes

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and support research into many diseases and conditions. The NIDDK is the primary institute at the NIH that funds diabetes research, including clinical trials. Clinical trials are part of clinical research and at the heart of all medical advances. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. Scientists are conducting research to learn more about diabetes, including the following studies The Glycemia Reduction Approaches in Diabetes: A Comparative Effectiveness Study ( GRADE ) is following more than 5,000 people across the country who have type 2 diabetes to find out which combination of two diabetes medicines is best for blood glucose, also called blood sugar, management; has the fewest side effects; and is the most helpful for overall health in long-term diabetes treatment. TrialNet is conducting research studies around the world, including risk screening for relatives of people with type 1 diabetes, monitoring for people at risk, and innovative clinical trials aimed at slowing down or stopping the disease. Researchers also use clinical trials to look at other aspects of care, such as improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. Find out if clinical trials are right for you . What clinical trials for diabetes are open? Below is a list of selected clinical trials that are currently open and recruiting, but you can expand or narrow your search. Type 1 diabetes includes studies funded by the NIH or other U.S. Government agencies Type 2 diabetes includes studies funded by the NIH or other U.S. Government agencies Gestational diabetes includes studies funded by the NIH; other U.S. G Continue reading >>

Diabetes Clinical Trials

Diabetes Clinical Trials

Diabetes clinical trials are an essential way for the medical research profession to understand more about diabetes and how it affects us . Before diabetes treatments are used to treat patients, their effects must be carefully tested in clinical phases. Clinical trials assess whether treatments are more effective than existing treatments. People with diabetes can get involved with this research and participate in research trials to further diabetes knowledge. So I can volunteer for a diabetes clinical trial? People with diabetes can participate in clinical studies or trials, and there is often a financial reward. Diabetes clinical trial participants play an important role in understanding treatments that could help thousands or even millions of people. They may also help to prevent diabetes or even find a cure . Current clinical trials and studies taking place in the UK: Could participating in a diabetes research trial give me side effects? Disadvantages or side effects may, in some cases, be a feature of clinical trials, although of course every step is taken to avoid this. People with diabetes that wish to take part in a research trial should consult with their healthcare team and also discuss clearly with the healthcare professionals engaged in the study. You should be given a clear idea of what to expect before committing to the clinical trial. If I get side effects from a clinical trial, who is liable? Diabetes.co.uk accepts no liability or responsibility for participation in any diabetes clinical trial or research trial, and is therefore not liable for any claims that may arise in the field of diabetes research. Where can I find a diabetes research trial to participate in? The resource above lists diabetes research trials that people with diabetes can participate Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials Of Stem Cell-based

Clinical Trials Of Stem Cell-based "functional Cure" For Type 1 Diabetes Underway

2 pictures A human clinical trial examining the safety and efficacy of a "functional cure" for type 1 diabetes is currently underway. Trials of the novel islet cell replacement therapy developed by ViaCyte involve a device containing stem cells being implanted into a patient with type 1 diabetes. It's hoped these cells will then mature into human islet tissue with insulin-producing beta cells that produce insulin on demand. So far, 2017 is proving to be an exciting year for breakthroughs in diabetes research, particularly in regards to treatments for type 1 diabetes. We have seen two very promising developments based in gene therapy, while a human trial for a type 1 diabetes vaccine is currently underway in Finland targeting a viral group known to trigger the disease. The new treatment developed by ViaCyte is being described as a "functional cure" in that it could replace the missing insulin cells in a diabetic patient, as opposed to a more direct "cure" which would address the autoimmune roots of the disease. The treatment being trialed piggybacks off prior working knowledge of islet cell transplantation being successful in patients with type 1 diabetes. For some time, patients with the disease have been treated with pancreatic cells from organ donors, successfully liberating them from insulin injections. "Islet transplants have been used to successfully treat patients with unstable, high-risk type 1 diabetes, but the procedure has limitations, including a very limited supply of donor organs and challenges in obtaining reliable and consistent islet preparations," says trial investigator James Shapiro. "An effective stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy would solve these issues and has the potential to help a greater number of people." The new treatment involves a Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials: American Diabetes Association

Clinical Trials: American Diabetes Association

The goal of the Vitamin D and type 2 diabetes (D2d) study is to determine whether vitamin D supplementation is safe and effective in delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in people at risk for the disease, and to gain a better understanding of how vitamin D affects glucose metabolism. The Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) is a bold new venture between the NIH, non-profit organizations and biopharmaceutical companies to transform the current model for developing new diagnostics and treatments. By jointly identifying and validating promising biological targets of disease, the partnership strives to increase the number of new diagnostics and therapies for patients and reduce the time and cost of developing them. The Biomarkers Consortium is a public-private biomedical research partnership managed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health that endeavors to discover, develop, and qualify biological markers (biomarkers) to support new drug development, preventive medicine, and medical diagnostics. By policy , the American Diabetes Association does not list or promote specific clinical trials other than the trials above in which it is a formal collaborator. This policy also applies to patient surveys. There are far too many trials and surveys being conducted at any given time for the Association to be able to evaluate them on an individual basis. However, the following resources from the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health provide more information about clinical trials and how to determine which trials are being conducted in a location near you. Continue reading >>

A Clinical Trial Just ‘reversed’ Type 2 Diabetes In 40% Of Participants

A Clinical Trial Just ‘reversed’ Type 2 Diabetes In 40% Of Participants

Researchers conducted a pilot study in which patients with type 2 diabetes underwent a medical intervention that included glucose-controlling drugs and a strict diet and exercise regiment. Four months after the intervention, the study revealed that 40 percent of the 83 subjects were able to effectively stop taking their medications, staying in partial or even complete remission. Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes, a disease wherein the body is incapable of producing sufficient levels of insulin or doesn’t respond to insulin correctly, can be a lifelong disease. It leads to the build up of blood sugars and in the cell’s inability to receive the energy it needs to function correctly. It’s also more likely to afflict people over the age of 40, those who are overweight, or anyone whose family has a history of diabetes. Prior to this research, there was no definitive cure for type 2 diabetes, although experts have long hypothesized that it could be reversible. A team of Canadian scientists have demonstrated that this theory is indeed correct. In some patients, type 2 diabetes can be reversed through a combination of lifestyle changes, intensive medical treatment using oral medication, and insulin therapy. The researchers published their study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. They tested their theory in diabetic patients who had been symptomatic for up to three years. The subjects underwent a personalized exercise regimen, and a strict diet that closely watched and limited their calorie intake to just 500 to 700 a day, and pharmacological treatment with glucose-controlling drugs. Four months after the intervention, the study revealed that 40 percent of the 83 subjects were able to effectively stop taking their medications, staying in partial Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Clinical Trials

Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Clinical Trials

A research study is evaluating an investigational medication for type 2 diabetes in patients who have moderate kidney impairment. We are currently seeking volunteers who are diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and who are currently being treated with oral diabetes medications or basal insulin and at least one oral diabetes medication. This study is comparing an investigational basal insulin to Lantus insulin. Half of the participants will be entered ... Do You Have Moderate Kidney Impairment? Study Seeking Patient with Type 2 Diabetes and an eGFR between 30 60. Study Description: We are currently seeking volunteers who are diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and have moderate kidney impairment. (If youve had labs drawn in the last year, find your ... Type 2 Diabetes Add-On Therapy for Metformin A research study is evaluating an investigational medication for type 2 diabetes in patients who are currently taking metformin (only). This research study may be an option if you: Have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes Are currently on a stable dose of Metformin and are having ... Type 2 Diabetes Add-On Therapy for Metformin A research study is evaluating an investigational medication for type 2 diabetes in patients who are currently taking metformin (only). This research study may be an option if you: Have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes Are currently on a stable dose of Metformin and are having difficulty ... We are currently seeking volunteers who are diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and treating with Metformin alone (1500mg or more a day, or max-tolerated dose). This is a study of an investigational, oral medication that may help to improve blood sugar levels. Participants will continue taking their Metformin, and be ... FIDELIO-DKD & FIGARO-DKD For Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Continue reading >>

The Basics Of Clinical Trials

The Basics Of Clinical Trials

How you can be part of advances in medical care [Participants] need to know everything about the trial, whats going to be expected of them, all the potential risks of the trial, and that its completely voluntary. And there is no punishment or repercussion if you decide to say no. When you choose to take the stairs, inject insulin, or check your blood glucose, you might think you are just following your doctor's orders to manage your diabetes. You may not realize that those actions trace back to knowledge gained from an important scientific process known as a clinical trial. Trials are responsible for the evolution of new treatments and guidelines in diabetes care, and they influence many of the decisions you make to manage your health. "Without clinical trials, there [would] not be advances in medical therapy," says Marc Reitman, MD, PhD, branch chief and senior investigator of diabetes, endocrinology, and obesity at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "They are absolutely essential. You cannot get a new drug without clinical trials, nor should you be able to." A clinical trial, by definition, means a study involving human subjects. Because of this, there is a rigorous approval and review process that ensures the trials are ethical, the risks are minimal, and the participants' rights are protected. There can even be some incentives, such as free medications, screenings, and access to specialized medical care. Read on for some basics to help you decide whether enrolling in a clinical trial is right for you. These types of studies can fall into several different categories and examine any number of scientific questions, but they all look at new ways to better prevent, detect, treat, or understand diseases. Clinical trials to investigate Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials

The DRI conducts research with the goal of translating findings from the lab to patientsas quickly as possible. After a promising treatment is developedand its safety and effectiveness in the pre-clinical setting proven, clinical investigators obtain regulatory approval to conduct diabetesstudies in patients. DRI clinical trials offer participantsthe opportunity to play an active role in the research process and to access potentialnew therapies before they are widely available. These studies provide important information to advance medicalresearch and are crucial to developing a cure for diabetes. Participants receive unparalleled care and related study procedures and medications throughout the trial at no cost. The DRIhas received approval from the Food and DrugAdministration to conduct several clinical trials.New studiesin the final planning stages aim to halt the body's attack on its own insulin-producing cells that caused the onset of type 1 diabetes and preserve islet cell function. These important trials will be conducted in multiple centers at the same time in order to speed the collection of data and the development of meaningful therapeutic strategies for patients. Participating in a clinical trial for diabetes or any other disease is an important personal decision.To learn more about whats involved, the National Institutes of Health provides information about participating in clinical trials on its web site. In addition, it is often helpful to talk to a physician, family members, or friends about deciding to join a trial. Though progress has been substantial and, as a cell therapy, islet transplantation has allowed many patients to live without the need for insulin therapy, it remains an experimental procedure available only through clinical trial participati Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials | Diabetes & Endocrinology Services | University Health System

Clinical Trials | Diabetes & Endocrinology Services | University Health System

Yes, you can change your mind at any time after entering the trial. You may also refuse to take part in any aspect of the research. This decision will not affect your right to receive the care you would receive if you were not in the study. In order for you to decide if the study is right for you, here are some questions you should ask before consenting to participate in the study. Why do researchers believe the new treatment being tested may be effective? Has it been tested before? What is the researcher's reason for doing the trial? Is he/she receiving payment for each research subject's participation? What tests and treatments does the study involve? Will I be hospitalized? What are the short-term and long-term risks and benefits of this trial? How will the trial affect my daily life? Could my condition become worse during the study? What will happen if it does? What do you do to monitor patient safety throughout the trial? What type of long-term follow up care is part of the study? Who will pay for the treatment and all other expenses related to the study? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 Clinical Trials

Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 Clinical Trials

Do you have Type 1 Diabetes? All trial-related visits, tests, and medications will be provided to participants at no cost. In addition, compensation for time and/or travel may be provided. We are currently seeking volunteers who are diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes and who are currently being treated with basal and bolus insulin. This study is comparing an investigational basal insulin to Lantus insulin. Half of the participants will be entered into a year-long study and will take the investigational ... You screen their Internet access. You screen their movies. Have you screened their blood for increased risk of Type 1 diabetes? A blood test can identify risk for type 1 diabetes up to 10 years before symptoms appear. This test is offered at no cost to people who have a ... People with Type I Diabetes Mellitus are asked to participate in a research study being conducted by University Physicians Group. You may be eligible to participate in this study if you: Are a male or female between the ages of 18 and 65 Have a diagnosis of Type ... One-day visit study to evaluate a new glucose meter Patient Inclusion Criteria: 12 years or older Must be able to perform self monitoring glucose testing without assistance Must be able to speak, read and write English Do you have Type 1 Diabetes? Are your blood sugar levels still too high on your current insulin regimen? If you are a man or woman over the age of 18, you may be eligible to participate in a clinical research study evaluating the safety and effectiveness of an investigational form of insulin in reducing blood sugar levels in individuals with Type 1 Diabetes. There is no cost to ... Continue reading >>

Get Involved In Diabetes Research

Get Involved In Diabetes Research

Diabetes research would not be possible without the support of people with diabetes. You can play a vital role by taking part in a research study or trial. Before new treatments can be used to help people with diabetes, they must be carefully tested to determine their safety and effectiveness. Clinical trials rely on volunteers to help them work out if treatments are safe, what the side effects are and whether they are more effective than existing treatments. By taking part in trials, you could play an important role in helping to prevent diabetes, to develop new and better treatments, or to find a potential cure. If you would like to take part in a clinical trial, you should always consult your healthcare team and speak to the healthcare professionals involved in the study. You should be aware that there may be adverse side effects or disadvantages when participating in research or trials. Find out more about what it's like to take part in medical research by listening to those who have already done it at HealthTalkOnline . If you would like to find clinical trials in which you might be able to take part, the UK Clinical Trials Gateway can help. They offer guidance on how trials work and can connect you to researchers running trials that you might be interested in. To find out what trials are currently underway for diabetes, please access the gateway here . We are keen to find out whether you found the gateway helpful, so please contact us on [email protected] with any feedback. We list current opportunities for getting involved here. The list is provided for information purposes only and should not be treated as advice or a recommendation for participation in any of the studies. All clinical trials are reviewed to ensure they are fair to participants and have Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials For Type 1 Diabetes

Clinical Trials For Type 1 Diabetes

Share on Facebook Tweet it Email it Print it Thanks to funding from Proposition 71, Californias $3 billion investment in stem cell research, and the state funding entity it created, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), there are now 36 human clinical trials in various stages of progress, including a trial for sickle cell disease. Description: Clinical trial of stem cell gene therapy for Type 1 Diabetes CIRM Funding Brief: Type 1 diabetes develops when the bodys own immune system kills the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Without insulin, blood sugar levels can spike, and cause organ and nerve damage, heart disease, limb amputation, or even death. This clinical trial will use human embryonic stem therapy to replace the lost beta cells that cause Type 1 diabetes. The partnership is developing a beta cell replacement therapy for insulin-dependent diabetes. If successful, the therapy will go beyond insulin function, and will perform the full array of normal beta cell functions, including responding in a more physiological manner than manual or mechanized insulin administration. Read more at CIRM. Principal Investigator: Robert Henry, James Shapiro Institution:UCSD, University of Alberta, ViaCyte, Inc. As this clinical trial moves forward, we will update this page. Check back here for future developments. As scientists and patient advocates build on the progress that Proposition 71 has enabled, we must keep the momentum going, understanding that there is still much work to be done. We must remember that human trials will celebrate successes; but, barriers will surface, along with complications and challenges, so patience and understanding of the scientific discovery process is essential. Even the setbacks will provide critical knowledge th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Clinical Trials In North Carolina - Find Clinical Trials For Diabetes In North Carolina

Diabetes Clinical Trials In North Carolina - Find Clinical Trials For Diabetes In North Carolina

Have you ever stopped to think what your life would be like without something as simple as an aspirin or as complex as an antibiotic? Before medications like these ever reached the store shelves or your local pharmacy, someone tested these drugs so that you might benefit. Someone also served as a clinical trial volunteer hoping to ease pain, hypertension, infections, and inflammation, and using medications being developed to benefit the general public. You can, too. Watch this video to see how a clinical trial at PMG Research helped a Diabetes patient You can be a volunteer for clinical trials in North Carolina at PMG Research. As a clinical trials volunteer, you're helping to develop medications for yourself, your family and friends, as well as millions of other individuals who need them most. In return, you'll also receive such benefits as access to quality care, health assessments and medications not available through other means at little or no cost, plus reimbursement for travel expenses. Continue reading >>

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