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Diabetes Treatment

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

A A A Are There Home Remedies (Diet, Exercise, and Glucose Monitoring) for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterized by the body's inability to regulate glucose (sugar) levels in blood. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but the body is not able to use the insulin effectively. The cause of type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune reaction. Combinations of genetic risk factors and unhealthy lifestyle choices cause type 2 diabetes. The main diagnostic test for diabetes is measurement of the blood glucose level. Changes in lifestyle and diet may be adequate to control some cases of type 2 diabetes. Others with type 2 diabetes require medications. Insulin is essential treatment for type 1 diabetes. No effective approach yet exists to prevent type 1 diabetes. Prevention of type 2 diabetes can be accomplished in some cases by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, sustaining a healthy lifestyle. Prediabetes is a condition that can occur before development of type 2 diabetes. Complications of any type of diabetes include damage to blood vessels, leading to heart disease or kidney disease. Damage to blood vessels in the eye can result in vision problems including blindness. Nerve damage can occur, leading to diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a set of related diseases in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar (specifically, glucose) in the blood. The blood delivers glucose to provide the body with energy to perform all daily activities. The liver converts the food a person eats into glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream from the liver between meals. In a healthy person, several hormones tightly regulate the blood glucose level, primarily insulin. Insulin is Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Treated?

How Is Diabetes Treated?

The goals of diabetes treatment are to control your blood glucose levels and prevent diabetes complications. Your diabetes healthcare team will focus on these three areas to help you achieve optimum health: Nutrition When you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you need to be very aware of not only what you eat, but also when and how much you eat. A Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) at Joslin can work with you to develop a healthy meal plan that fits your lifestyle. Following a meal plan can also help you lose weight and lower your risk of developing complications. Physical Activity Physical activity is an important part of controlling diabetes and preventing complications such as heart disease and high blood pressure. "We know that exercise is a very effective way to help bring blood sugars under control for someone with type 2 diabetes," says Kenneth Snow, M.D., Acting Chief, Adult Diabetes, Joslin Clinic. Try for 30 minutes of moderate exercise, like brisk walking, on most days. Joslin's Why WAIT? and Easy Start exercise programs are great resources for developing a safe weight loss program. Medications If you have type 2 diabetes, sometimes eating healthy and engaging in physical activity is not enough. Your doctor may give you oral medication to help control your blood glucose levels. For people with type 1 diabetes (and some people with type 2 diabetes) this means taking insulin. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin to control diabetes--and this can only be done through multiple injections or by an insulin pump, a small device that delivers insulin continuously throughout the day. For more on medications and diabetes, click here. To make an appointment with a Certified Diabetes Educator at Joslin, please call 617-732-2440 Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Treatments

Type 1 Diabetes Treatments

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) can live long, happy lives with proper care and disease management. Advancements in medication types and delivery methods give people the freedom to choose which treatment options work best with their particular circumstance. T1D prognoses can be greatly improved with a combination of treatments and lifestyle choices. Insulin and other medications Insulin Type 1 diabetes is managed through use of a variety of insulins. People with T1D must work closely with their medical team to find the right insulin treatment for their condition. Further information about the types of insulin and their effects are available on our insulin page. Insulin can be delivered via syringes or pens, pumps or new artificial pancreas systems. Though the administration method, frequency and type of insulin dosage vary on a case-by-case basis, injections may be needed multiple times per day. Metformin and other medications Metformin: Combined with insulin, diet and exercise, type 2 diabetes (T2D) drug metformin is sometimes prescribed to people with T1D to help treat their diabetes. Metformin helps control the body’s blood-sugar levels and how the liver processes sugar. Pramlintide (Symlin): Used in conjunction with insulin, pramlintide is often prescribed after other medications prove not as effective as needed. It acts as a hormone to help the body better control blood sugar. Blood pressure drugs, cholesterol medications and aspirin: Medications for high blood pressure and high cholesterol as well as aspirin can be prescribed with insulin to help the overall health and treatment of diabetes. Since people with diabetes have an increased chance of cardiovascular disease, these drugs are used in combination with other diabetes medications. Side effects of medicat Continue reading >>

This Researcher Says Diabetes Is Not Always Chronic. Here’s How To Cure It

This Researcher Says Diabetes Is Not Always Chronic. Here’s How To Cure It

If you Google type 2 diabetes, reliable sources—like the National Institutes of Health website—will tell you that it’s a chronic condition. But Newcastle University researcher Roy Taylor, M.D., begs to differ. His research finds that some people are able to reverse their diabetes by going on an ultra low-calorie diet. For Dr. Taylor’s new study, 30 diabetic people ate just 700 calories daily for two months. They lost 31 pounds on average. Related: THE 21-DAY METASHRED—One Guy Lost 25 Pounds In Just 6 Weeks! Twelve of those subjects’ blood sugar levels fell below the threshold for diabetes, 126 milligrams per deciliter, as a result. Some of their levels were completely within the normal range, Dr. Taylor says, but the average fell within pre-diabetic parameters. Afterward, the researchers gave the study participants guidance on portion size to help them return to a normal diet while maintaining their new, lower weight. Six months later, all of those people were still diabetes-free. That means that as long as they keep their weight down, they no longer need to take insulin or constantly monitor their blood sugar. They’re no longer at risk for premature heart attacks and strokes, or diabetes complications that can damage their eyes, kidneys, and feet, says Dr. Taylor. Plus, they just feel better—poor blood sugar regulation can zap your energy. How does a diet cure type 2 diabetes? It comes down to weight loss, he says. Diabetes is caused by a buildup of fat in your pancreas, Dr. Taylor says. The extra fat screws with your organ’s ability to make insulin, the hormone that controls your blood sugar. Related: Does Sugar Really Cause Diabetes? But when you lose fat, the first bit to go is the fat in your organs, says Dr. Taylor. “In the first 10 to 14 kilog Continue reading >>

Is Trina Diabetes Treatment Right For You?

Is Trina Diabetes Treatment Right For You?

Cutting-Edge Diabetes Treatment Trina Health of West Los Angeles has helped many people ease the complications associated with Diabetes with natural treatment that stimulates your body’s metabolism to properly manage glucose levels.* Take a stand against the disease and talk to our doctors today and find out if Trina Health Diabetes Treatment is right for you! FDA Cleared | Covered by Medicare and most PPO insurance plans. Trina Health Diabetes Treatment When you receive the Trina Health diabetes treatment, you may feel normal, and experience an increased feeling of well-being. Our Treatment may ease many of the complications associationed with diabetes including:* Retinopathy: Vision Problems Neuropathy: Tingling/Numbness Kidney disease Trouble Sleeping Erectile Dysfunction Wounds slow to heal Fatigue, low Energy, weakness Mental Fog or reduced memory Ability to control glucose I have way more energy, and I sleep well now… I was skeptical when I first heard of this treatment. I attended an event in their clinic to learn more. Since starting the treatment my results are clear. My neuropathy in my feet has decreased, My vision is getting better, but MOST important – That diabetic fog seems to have left my head. I think more clearly* – I’m way sharper. I have much more pep to my step. I have way more energy, and I sleep well now. I LOVE THIS!!!! Jenny B. Trina Health of West Los Angeles Team Take the first step…Get a free Health Evaluation today! Continue reading >>

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is often part of treating diabetes. Along with healthy food choices and physical activity, medicine can help you manage the disease. Some other treatment options are also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your type of diabetes and how well the medicine controls your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Other factors, such as your other health conditions, medication costs, and your daily schedule may play a role in what diabetes medicine you take. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin because your body no longer makes this hormone. You will need to take insulin several times during the day, including with meals. You also could use an insulin pump, which gives you small, steady doses throughout the day. Type 2 diabetes Some people with type 2 diabetes can manage their disease by making healthy food choices and being more physically active. Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes medicines as well. These medicines may include diabetes pills or medicines you inject under your skin, such as insulin. In time, you may need more than one diabetes medicine to control your blood glucose. Even if you do not take insulin, you may need it at special times, such as during pregnancy or if you are in the hospital. Gestational diabetes If you have gestational diabetes, you should first try to control your blood glucose level by making healthy food choices and getting regular physical activity. If you can’t reach your blood glucose target, your health care team will talk with you about diabetes medicines, such as insulin or the diabetes pill metformin, that may be safe for you to take during pregnancy. Your health care team may start you on diab Continue reading >>

Smart Artificial Beta Cells Could Lead To New Diabetes Treatment

Smart Artificial Beta Cells Could Lead To New Diabetes Treatment

Media contact: Mark Derewicz, 984-974-1915, [email protected] CHAPEL HILL, NC – Treating type 1 diabetes and some cases of type 2 diabetes has long required painful and frequent insulin injections or a mechanical insulin pump for insulin infusion. But researchers from the University of North Carolina and NC State have now developed what could be a much more patient-friendly option: artificial cells that automatically release insulin into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise. These “artificial beta cells” (AβCs) mimic the functions of the body’s natural glucose-controllers, the insulin-secreting beta cells of the pancreas. The loss or dysfunction of these cells causes type 1 diabetes and many cases of type 2 diabetes. The idea is that the AβCs could be subcutaneously inserted into patients, which would be replaced every few days, or by a painless and disposable skin patch. As the researchers report in Nature Chemical Biology, a single injection of the AβCs into diabetic mice lacking beta cells quickly normalized the animals’ blood glucose levels and kept those levels normal for up to five days. “Our plan now is to further optimize and test these synthetic cells in larger animals, develop a skin patch delivery system for them, and ultimately test them in people with diabetes,” said principal investigator Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering. Gu also holds appointments in the UNC School of Medicine, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and the UNC Diabetes Care Center. At least six million people in the United States use insulin as a diabetes treatment, either by injection or a mechanical pump. So far, delivered insulin in pill form has been challenging because it’s a large molecule th Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your blood glucose levels. One medicine (usually metformin) is used first but two or even three medicines may be needed. Most of the medicines for type 2 diabetes are given in tablet form. However, some people with type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to help control blood glucose levels. Some people gain a great deal of benefit from insulin injections and these are sometimes used fairly soon after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has been made. Insulin injections can be used in combination with other medicines to further improve glucose control. Lifestyle - diet, weight control an Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment

Diabetes Treatment

On this page you will find links to diabetes-related treatments found on FDA web pages and other trusted government websites. Medicines to Treat Diabetes Devices to treat Diabetes Diabetes Research Search for Diabetes Related Clinical Trial Enter a word or phrase, such as the name of a medical condition or intervention. Example: Diabetes AND Los Angeles Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Learn how to manage type 2 diabetes. In this section, you'll learn about: This section focuses on the medical management of type 2 diabetes. And as the term “ medical management” implies, this management is done with the guidance of your medical provider and medical team. The key principles of medical management are: Regular blood sugar (and ketone) self monitoring as a part of daily living Taking diabetes medications such as pills, injected medicines or even insulin Problem solving how and when to make adjustments in your medication doses to prevent high or low blood sugars Understanding complications and how to screen for, prevent and treat them Good management requires all of these elements. All the elements are intertwined. For example, you need to monitor your blood sugar to know if your treatment is successful. You need to problem solve if the self blood sugar monitoring shows your treatment is not successful. The self blood sugar monitoring will indicate if you need to start, adjust the dose or change the type of diabetes medications. Regular screening for diabetes-related complications may pick up a complication that is in the early stages, and early treatment usually gives the best results. In this section, you will find: Self-management solutions: How to analyze what is causing you to have low blood sugars and/or high blood sugars There are different problem solving sections depending upon your type of treatment: Complications: Reviews diabetic complications –both ones that develop rapidly (acutely) or slowly (chronically) – how to recognize them, and what to do if they occur. Continue reading >>

Treatment For Diabetes

Treatment For Diabetes

Tweet Successful treatment makes all the difference to long-term health, and achieving balanced diabetes treatment can be the key to living with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment varies for each individual, not simply on the type of diabetes that they have, but also more individual-specific diabetic treatment differences. Treating your diabetes Your diabetes treatment and management strategy should be agreed between you and your health care team. The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep, within reason, blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible. Training in self management of diabetes forms an essential part of diabetes management. Treatment should be agreed on an individual basis and address medical, psychosocial and lifestyle issues. Balanced diabetes treatments A variety of different factors have a role to play in treating diabetes, but the importance of balanced, co-ordinated diabetes treatment for all diabetics cannot be underestimated. Regular and successful treatment decreases the risk of each patient developing diabetes complications. The basics of diabetes treatment are broken down into each diabetic type below. Treatment of Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes treatment is a daily task. Lack of insulin production by the pancreas makes Type 1 diabetes is particularly difficult to control. Treatment requires a strict regimen that typically includes a carefully calculated diet, planned physical activity, multiple daily insulin injections and home blood glucose testing a number of times per day. Treatment of Type 2 diabetes Treatment typically includes diet control, exercise, home blood glucose testing, and in some cases, oral medication and/or insulin. Approximately 40% of people with type 2 diabetes require insulin injections. Tweet Type 2 diabetes m Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Treated In Children?

How Is Diabetes Treated In Children?

Download PDF (713 K) On this page Is your child packing on the pounds? Becoming a couch potato? Then he or she may be at risk for getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes once occurred mainly in adults who are overweight and over 40, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Today, it is increasingly diagnosed in youths age 10 to 19. Why is this happening? Because just like adults, kids are heavier now. An estimated 1 in 6 children and teens is obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Along with a family history of diabetes, being overweight and inactive are the main risk factors for type 2 diabetes, says Ilan Irony, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The two main types of diabetes—type 1 and type 2—are treatable, says Irony. “In addition to changes in diet and a healthier lifestyle, treatments can help control blood sugar and prevent or delay long-term complications of diabetes.” FDA-approved treatments for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are all about keeping the blood sugar (glucose) levels in a normal range. But there is no one treatment that works for everybody, says Irony. And treatments may need to be changed if side effects of a particular medication are not tolerated. Also, additional medications may need to be added as diabetes gets worse over time. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children starting at age 12 or 13, says Irony. “In children, the disease tends to get worse in puberty when the body produces hormones that make insulin less effective,” he says. Insulin is the hormone that controls blood sugar levels. “The first line of treatment is a healthy diet and other lifestyle changes,” says Irony. “If a child is ov Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: It's Not Just Insulin

Diabetes Treatment: It's Not Just Insulin

Insulin usually isn’t the first line of defense for type 2 diabetes treatment. Find out about lifestyle changes and other medication options you can try to help control type 2 diabetes. If you’re newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your first worry might be that you’ll need to begin insulin injections immediately to get your blood sugar under control. But unless your blood sugar levels are dangerously high, chances are that insulin won’t be the first step in your type 2 diabetes treatment plan. The most recent type 2 diabetes treatment guidelines, published in the January 2015 issue of the journal Diabetes Care, suggest that the best place to begin may be with a personalized, diabetes-friendly diet and increasing physical activity, along with using the common oral type 2 diabetes medication metformin (or an alternative, if there’s a reason you can’t take metformin). People who are very motivated to address type 2 diabetes through lifestyle changes may try diet and exercise alone for three to six months after diagnosis. The current type 2 diabetes treatment recommendations are: Weight loss. Losing at least 5 percent of body weight can improve type 2 diabetes control significantly, according to the guidelines. Dietary changes. Work with your doctor to create a diet that has a healthy balance of protein, carbohydrates, fats, and fruits and vegetables, according to the American Diabetes Association. Limiting the simple carbohydrates in your diet, such as crackers and bread, is a cornerstone of diabetes control. Physical activity. About 150 minutes of exercise a week, or 30 minutes five or more days a week, is recommended for type 2 diabetes control. In addition, resistance training at least two days a week is also recommended to significantly improve blood sug Continue reading >>

Apple Is Reportedly Working On Sensors For Diabetes Treatment

Apple Is Reportedly Working On Sensors For Diabetes Treatment

Apple is quietly developing sensors that can track the body’s blood sugar levels in a bid to help people with diabetes, CNBC reports. The company has apparently hired a small team of biomechanical engineers to work on the project, which would monitor glucose levels through contact with the skin, rather than through invasive blood tests or similar mechanisms. The company is basing the team working on the sensors out of an office in Palo Alto, rather than at its main headquarters. The engineers have apparently been working on the sensor technology for at least five years, and it is complete enough that Apple has started feasibility trials at clinical locations in the Bay Area. The company has also hired consultants that are helping it navigate complex health regulations, CNBC says. The team is reportedly managed by Johny Srouji, Apple's senior vice president of hardware technologies, but previously reported to Michael D. Hillman before he left the company in 2015. CNBC says the team is made up of about 30 people, including biomedical experts Apple hired away from major firms like Masimo Corp, Sano, Medtronic, and C8 Medisensors. Those hires, reported early last year, sparked speculation that Apple may indeed be working on such a product. The idea of wearable devices being used to manage conditions like diabetes was developed during Steve Jobs’ tenure as Apple head, but developing technology that can accurately measure blood sugar levels without piercing the skin is particularly difficult. John L. Smith, a biomedical expert who has published papers on the failure of non-invasive glucose sensors, said it was "the most difficult technical challenge I have encountered in my career." Apple’s in-development solution reportedly shines light through the skin to check curren Continue reading >>

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