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Diabetes Travel Case

Diabete-ezy - Multi-fit Case - Diabetes Case - Diabetes Management

Diabete-ezy - Multi-fit Case - Diabetes Case - Diabetes Management

The stylish Multi-fit Case carries everything that the Ezy-fit Case carries plus much more. This new design is suitable for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. The outer case is made of a tough, easy to clean material with a lanyard loop handle, while Velcro and elastic features are used to hold equipment into place. The top compartment carries a BG Meter, 2 x pen needles, foil or canister test strips, a lancet device, insulin vials, Test-wipes, a Record Book, a Card Sized Personalised Management Plan, a biro, a needle and lancet tips, as well as a rubbish bin. The compartment underneath can carry Insulin Pump Consumables, a GlucaGen Hypokit, jelly beans or food for hypo treatments, spare batteries, Test-wipes, test strips, other medications or even money and credit cards. The case suits most blood glucose meters, including the Optium, Xceed, FreeStyle mini, Accu-Chek Perfoma, Integra, Go, Senso Card, CareSens, TrueTrack. Finally, everything can truly be stored in the one place. The Diabete-ezy, Multi-fit case is fitted with YKK zips. These zips are known for being the strongest in the world. Although the Multi-fit cases have these zips and are designed to house many different items, over packing the case with bulky items can shorten the lifespan of the zips. Continue reading >>

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

A New Diabetic Supply Carrying Case

The day after I was released from the hospital after my diagnosis of being a Type 1 Diabetic, I looked over my syringes, vials, test strips, lancets, logbook and other such supplies and decided I needed some sort of carrying case. However, in being either vain or private, I wanted it to be discrete. Thankfully, this was before the age of smartphones, and toting around a day planner wasn’t all that uncommon. I wound up using my diagnosis as an excuse to buy a Palm Vx to eliminate the logbook and my paper sliding scale and then I picked up a day planner from Franklin Covey. I wound up emptying it of everything except the zip-lock pouch inside, and that’s where I stored my supplies. It had a nice little pocket inside for PDAs, which fit my Palm Vx nicely, and when it was obsolete, that’s where my glucometer and lancing device went. I had this day planner so long that it even got nicknames, it was known as “The Diabetes.” I’ve always been afraid of losing “The Diabetes.” It had its own place everywhere that I’ve lived, and the minute it is moved from that place, chaos and anarchy began to take over my life. 999 times out of 1000, “The Diabetes” just wound up getting pushed out of the way, relocated over to my computer desk, left in my laptop bag or scooped up by my loving wife and tucked away because she takes such good care of me. I remember scolding her a little bit and telling her that I loved how much she helped out but that one day I’d take it for granted and we’d both forget “The Diabetes” and we’d wind up somewhere and needing it, or worse, forgetting it somewhere. We tackled that challenge and it just became part of our routine, she grabbed it and packed it in her purse and then I asked her before we left to make sure she had it. Ever Continue reading >>

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply And Travel Case

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply And Travel Case

Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Travel Cases When you have diabetes, you know how painful it is to travel with the entire insulin supply; there are numerous things at once, and also they are fragile. So, in that situation, you need to have good quality insulin travel cases to support the whole package you are carrying. There are several different things like test strips, medications, glucose meter and other backup items. Hence, Top 10 Best Diabetes Insulin Supply and Travel Case. Insulin: Insulin is a hormone that is created by the beta cells in the pancreatic islets. It is responsible for regulating the proper metabolism of different components like Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Fats by helping the glucose in getting absorbed in the fat, muscles and liver cells from the blood. The glucose is further then converted into glycogen or fats, and when it is the liver tissues, it is converted into both the forms. The excessive production of glucose is controlled by the insulin present in the blood. The insulin circulation also has effects on the manufacture of proteins. Thus if the insulin levels go down in your blood, it has harsh effects on your whole body. Types of Insulin: There are various types of Insulin’s, but there are three main types of them: Fast-acting insulin: This insulin is very quickly absorbed into the blood from the fat tissues. This is also helpful when one wants to control or correct sugar levels in the blood while having meals or snack or even when one wants to correct high levels of sugar in the blood. Intermediate-acting Insulin: This insulin is absorbed slowly and very steadily in the blood and also lasts a lot longer than the other ones. This is mainly had between meals or to control blood sugar level Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Travel - Diabetes Can't Stop Me!

Diabetes And Travel - Diabetes Can't Stop Me!

If you have diabetes you will understand the anxiety that can arise when planning a trip away from home or out of your usual routine. Many people worry about how they will manage their diabetes in an environment that is unpredictable. How will you get meals that you can eat, when you need them? How will you get through airport security? Will the weather impact on your blood glucose levels? And how about keeping insulin and medications at the right temperature? These and many other questions can run through your mind when thinking about travelling with diabetes. If you have not had diabetes for long and/or have never travelled since getting diabetes, these concerns can even prevent you from going away. Having diabetes doesnt mean your travelling days are over! Like many other situations in life with diabetes, to make sure you have safe, healthy and enjoyable trip it is important to plan ahead and consider all aspects of your journey such as weather, time zones, length of transit time, access to meals, the amount of activity you will be undertaking and potential adjustment to medications and insulin. Consider how much medication, insulin, blood glucose monitoring supplies, batteries and so on and making sure you have more than enough, is also critical. Many people with diabetes travel across the world. If travelling locally and you are driving: Pan plenty of rest stops, opportunities to check your blood glucose levels and stock up on carbohydrates. Dont drive long distances without keeping tabs on what is happening with your blood glucose. Share the driving with your travelling companions if possible. If travelling to tropical or hot regions, be aware that some people find their insulin works faster under these conditions. Travel in general can play havoc with your blood Continue reading >>

Cases | No More Shots For Shannon

Cases | No More Shots For Shannon

What do you carry your diabetes supplies in? Lets discuss my history with cases for a moment. I was diagnosed in 1992. And at the time, they admitted me in the hospital for a week so I could do inpatient training 3x a day to basically learn how to flip my life upside down and be diabetic. In a nutshell. But I digress. Then they sent me home with this beauty of a case. It was big enough to hold it all my meter (One Touch which was ginormous compared to my tiny Freestyle I use now), my insulin, a freezer pack, syringes, alcohol wipes, glucose tablets, and pretty much a spare of anything I needed. I used it for several years then gradually just started using the infamous black case. You know the one. The one that every meter comes in. So the only main difference is the size of said black case. The only thing you can really care in there is the meter, lancet device, and spare lancets. (Which those are pointless for most of us, considering we dont change them, right? #likeyoudo) And I am terrible about not carrying insulin with me. I have what is in my pump reservoir, and my spare supply is almost always at home. When I was still on injections with syringes or pens, I just carried them loose in my purse. And I put the insulin vial in my black case with my meter. Not very secure or sanitary, though. But its what I did for years. And years. Last year I decided to try a Myabetic case. I had kept hearing about them and they are SO stinkin cute. And I have a few friends that absolutely rave about theirs on Facebook and I wanted my own to love. I first bought this one at Target. It was super cute, but I ended up taking it back. It was bulky and I just didnt like the layout of it. It wasnt functional for my needs/preferences. (Everyone is different YDMV.) Then I decided to bite th Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

Top 10 Diabetes Carrying Cases

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you don’t realize how much STUFF you have to always carry with you wherever you go. The items only multiple as time goes on and more treatment methods are added, etc. So where are you supposed to keep everything from your meter, to extra test strips, emergency medications and more? For women, you can opt to keep everything in your purse, but most often this can become disorganized and only creates additional frustration when you have to find everything in a pinch. In this guide we’re going to take a look at some of the best diabetes carrying cases on the market for those with all types of diabetes and of any age. If you haven’t found a case yet, then this guide can help start you on your journey of purchasing the right one. Or if it’s time to update your case, you may find one that suits your needs. I know with my kids with Type 1 diabetes, in the beginning I would have to purchase a new case every few months because of the wear and tear from carrying them virtually 24/7 no matter where we go. That was before I knew which were some of the best ones that not only provide you with somewhere to nicely keep all supplies organized but are durable enough to withstand frequent use. Here are some of my all-time favorites. 1. Medicool Dia-Pak The Medicool Dia-Pak allows you to conveniently keep all your supplies in one organized place. What’s nice about this diabetes carrying case is it comes with a freezable ice pack that allows you to keep your insulin or other supplies cool when traveling. Keeping everything together in one bag without bulkiness can be tricky, especially when it comes to making sure you have all the supplies you may need. The Medicool Dia-Pak folds up nicely to fit into a purse, travel bag, suitcase, or even ca Continue reading >>

The Fantastic Four Diabetes Travel Tips

The Fantastic Four Diabetes Travel Tips

In my junior year of college I was suppose to study abroad in Europe. I had my trip all set and was in the midst of selecting my classes. 6 weeks before I was suppose to depart, I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. After my diagnosis, my family and I felt it was best not to go. I needed to master diabetes first before I could venture off as an exchange student. I spent that semester re-learning how to live my daily life. Since being diagnosed 4 years ago, I’ve gone from being intimidated by travel to figuring out how to do what I love and travel all the time. Travel for me ranges from a weekend at the beach to ski trips, hiking, exploring cities, and of course trips as part of my job as a Customer Success Manager at Glooko. To make traveling a reality for me, I’ve developed what I call the “Fantastic Four Diabetes Travel Tips” which have made traveling for me easier and safer. I thought I’d share them here: 1: Have a Packing List & Triple Check It! Early in my days with diabetes, I didn’t have traveling mastered and it almost proved catastrophic. I was heading to my cousin’s wedding in Cleveland, Ohio and I was in the airport scheduled to board my flight. I hear my Omnipod chirp, notifying me it was time to change my pod. I go to get my insulin and it is not there. I then realize I left my insulin and backup pods at my house. What to do? I called my parents (already in Cleveland for the wedding) to let them know the situation. In a worst case scenario, I would have had to resort to insulin pens for that weekend. I hadn’t used pens since my early diagnosis, so I was in for an experiment and some pain in the midst of this weekend away. My parents called Omnipod who then connected them with the local Cleveland rep. She was extremely kind, dropped everythin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Travel Case Travels To Market

Diabetes Travel Case Travels To Market

A new diabetes travel case called the Daily Organizer holds three days of supplies, including insulin and a glucose meter. The Daily Organizer, from Medport, comes with a refreezable ice pack to keep insulin cool, and a temperature monitor to make sure the insulin remains at the proper temperature. A separate compartment keeps a monitor at room temperature. The retail price is $18.99, which includes a free brochure with tips on diabetes care while traveling. The Daily Organizer is available by calling (800) 299-5704. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website. A few facts about me in case you are new to my column and site. My life in the diabetes community started at a young age as the secret keeper of my maternal and paternal Grandmothers. They both had type 2 diabetes and my days spent alone with them exposed me to their misunderstanding of how their diabetes really affected them. Eating candy bars, hiding the candy wrappers and smoking cigarettes seemed innocent enough to them. A decade later I married a type 1 person living with diabetes and experienced the full court of the diabetes spectrum with my type 2 family members and type Continue reading >>

The Essential Diabetes Travel Bag

The Essential Diabetes Travel Bag

Whether you’re traveling for 2 days or 2 weeks, your packing goal is probably the same: to pack and travel as lightly as possible. Skyrocketing baggage fees—not to mention the hassle of toting around extra luggage—can make you more inclined to leave unnecessary items behind whenever possible. However, for people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, a host of essential health-related travel items can make the goal of traveling lightly seem impossible. From syringes and pen needles to blood glucose meters, the supplies you need to manage your health while you’re away can seem daunting. This article offers a list of common “must-haves” for the management of diabetes during your vacation. Be sure to consult with your healthcare professional to discuss any essential additions or subtractions that can keep you healthy—while lightening your load. Diabetes medications: Count up the number of days you plan to be away—then pack at least twice as much medication as you think you’ll need.1 Though it may seem like a lot, a host of factors (think multi-hour flight delays) can extend your trip. If you are flying, it is important to pack your medications in your carry-on bag so that you have easy access to them, and so that there is no threat of them getting lost in checked luggage. While you’re in the air, make sure to store your bag under the seat in front of you (instead of in the overhead compartment) so that you can reach them at any point during the flight. Insulin and syringes/pen needles: You are allowed to take insulin, syringes/pen needles, and other equipment on airplanes (See our Airport Travel Regulations article for more information). To keep insulin from losing its strength, it should not be stored at extreme temperatures. Use an insulated travel Continue reading >>

Timesulin Travel Tips: 3 Gadgets For Making Travel With Diabetes Better

Timesulin Travel Tips: 3 Gadgets For Making Travel With Diabetes Better

If there’s one hallmark of the holiday season, it’s traveling. Visiting family and catching up with old friends is always great. Getting from here to there, though, may not be so great. We’ve written before about how to effectively manage traveling with diabetes supplies, but traveling during the holiday season with a bunch of T1D gear can test the patience (and sanity!) of even the saintliest traveler. So before you pack everything up and head to the airport, take a look at these nifty travel diabetes gadgets that we use while we’re on the road. It may not take all the stress out of traveling, but it can definitely make it a lot more manageable. Diabetes supplies travel kits and cases usually comes in two varieties: ones that are stylish, but provide very little functionality; and ones that provide great functionality, but look like boring medical supply cases. Diabete-ezy has managed to find a great middle ground, though, by creating a trendy and colorful case that’s durable while still having a million compartments for everything from your BGM and insulin pen to test wipes, insulin vials, and snacks (for any hypos that may happen). On common challenge that we all have when we’re on the road is how to keep our insulin refrigerated. FRIO has helped solve that problem by creating a slim, easy-to-pack wallet that holds your insulin, keeps it cool, and protects it from breakage (if it’s in a vial). The best thing, though, is that it’s versatile, so you can use it with an insulin pen (or two, as they have a duo wallet) or with a syringe and vial of insulin. Keep in mind, to use the FRIO wallet with our Timesulin replacement cap, you’ll need to specifically order the protective cover, which will shield Timesulin from moisture. Did we also mention that it Continue reading >>

Diabetes Carry Case Reviews From Diabetesmine

Diabetes Carry Case Reviews From Diabetesmine

One universal truth about living with diabetes is that you’ll need to carry around a lot of gear – a glucose meter with lancing device and test strips, medications, low-blood sugar treatments and more, with backups for everything when you travel. Women with diabetes often joke that their days of cute little party purses are over. And men with diabetes often complain that there aren’t enough options for male-friendly diabetes gear bags. If you take insulin, there’s also the issue of keeping that sensitive drug safe and temperature-controlled (cool enough not to overheat but also never freezing). What to do for tote bags and travel-case options? Over the years, DiabetesMine has looked at an array of carry bags and insulin coolers that help solve these issues (in alphabetical order): aDorn Designs - link to our video review aDorn makes a collection of fashionable handbags, clutch cases and even an over-the-shoulder messenger bag designed specifically to carry diabetes supplies. Special zipper compartments with mesh pockets and elastic grips make it easy to store glucose test strips, syringes, fast-acting glucose and more. In this review, we look at the Elite clutch case in bright patterns. BellaSoul - link to our written review Founded by the aunt of a type 1, Bella Soul has a line of both classy patent leather evening bags and embroidered shoulder bags that have built-in pockets for your diabetes supplies. Their mission? "To support diabetes management without compromising style and femininity." ChillMed Bags These are soft-sided “organizer bags” designed to be sturdier than competitors. They use industrial-quality zippers and a high thread count fabric that's heavier-gauge and extremely durable. ChillMED bags also compliment the popular FRIO Cooling Wallet (s Continue reading >>

Diabete-ezy

Diabete-ezy

The stylish Multi-fit Case carries everything that the Ezy-fit Case carries plus much more. This new design is suitable for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. The outer case is made of a tough, easy to clean material with a lanyard loop handle, while Velcro and elastic features are used to hold equipment into place.The top compartment carries a BG Meter, 2 x pen needles, foil or canister test strips, a lancet device, insulin vials, Test-wipes, a Record Book, a Card Sized Personalised Management Plan, a biro, a needle and lancet tips, as well as a rubbish bin. The compartment underneath can carry Insulin Pump Consumables, a GlucaGen Hypokit, jelly beans or food for hypo treatments, spare batteries, Test-wipes, test strips, other medications or even money and credit cards.The case suits most blood glucose meters, including the Optium, Xceed, FreeStyle mini, Accu-Chek Perfoma, Integra, Go, Senso Card, CareSens, TrueTrack.Finally, everything can truly be stored in the one place.Terms & ConditionsThe Diabete-ezy, Multi-fit case is fitted with YKK zips. These zips are known for being the strongest in the world. Although the Multi-fit cases have these zips and are designed to house many different items, over packing the case with bulky items can shorten the lifespan of the zips... The dispenser box is designed to fit easily into most testing cases and provides a convenient and simple way to clean your testing site prior and post BGL testing. Test-wipes are also great for cleaning insulin pump sites before inserting and once a site has been removed.Whether you have Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes, an accurate reading of your blood glucose level (BGL) is vital. Washing your hands before testing seems like a simple solution to remove all impurities, such as fruit juice, food and dirt. Continue reading >>

Travel And Diabetes

Travel And Diabetes

Diabetes shouldn't stop you from going places. If you plan and prepare well, you can travel knowing that you can manage your diabetes no matter where your travels take you. Here are some general guidelines for traveling with diabetes. Carry or wear an ID that lets people know you have diabetes. It's also a good idea carry a note from your doctor about your diabetes care and the medicines you're taking. If you go through airport security, carry a letter from your doctor stating that you need certain diabetes supplies. Be sure to tell the security agent that you have diabetes and are carrying your supplies. You should check ahead with the airline about any requirements. Stick to routines as much as possible. This includes the timing of your medications, meals, and exercise. Plan for time changes. If you'll be crossing two or more time zones, ask your health care team about how to adjust the timing of your meals, medications, and blood sugar testing. Carry snacks. Include some form of fast-acting sugar because you might not always be able to eat meals on schedule. Check your blood sugar often. Your activity level, meals, and sleep patterns will change when you're traveling. By checking your blood sugar, you'll find out if you need to make adjustments to your food or medicine. Take extra care of your feet. Traveling often means walking more than usual. Be sure to take comfortable shoes that provide good support. Pack extra socks so you can keep your feet warm and dry. Keep your diabetes supplies where you can easily reach them. If you're traveling by air, train, or bus, pack your diabetes supplies in a carry-on bag. Carry extra supplies. Plan to bring enough supplies to last an extra week beyond your planned stay, and bring a prescription for each item. That way you won't Continue reading >>

Myabetic Review: Tools To Help Me Travel The World

Myabetic Review: Tools To Help Me Travel The World

I've been fortunate enough to review two Myabetic cases, designed specifically to help you travel the world more easily when you have a lot of supplies. When travelling the world with type 1 diabetes, it can become a little difficult to manage all of your supplies in one place, especially when you’ve got to bring such a large amount for a long period of time. I wouldn't describe myself as the best-organised person, especially when it comes to my diabetes supplies, so I was in desperate need for something to help keep me organised while travelling. The problem is, I don’t like using stuff that looks “medical”. There is something quite depressing about it and I’m always reminded of what I have when I look at my supplies etc. Thankfully, however, I found Myabetic and their amazing Diabetes cases that are not only functional but pretty too! I am privileged enough to have gotten my hands on two different cases and I thought I’d give you a mini review of them for what type of trips they are used for and how much supplies I can fit into them. The two products I own are the Kamen case (mines in blue) and the Thompson Diabetes Travel Carry- all in beautiful purple. Kamen Diabetes Case The details... This case I currently have with me on my 4 month trip to South East Asia. This product consists of two main compartments but there is also a zip area at the front that I find useful for carrying packets of skittles or dextrose for hypos. Whether you’re on an insulin pump or insulin pens, this case works for you. There is room for your diabetes monitor, pricker, test strips, and insulin pens. If you are on a pump, I usually use it like this for day trips. I pop my insertion device in here>> I pop a spare infusion set in here>> My Freestyle Libre in here>> Spare insulin c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Travel Bag From Myabetic: For When You Really Need All Your Diabetes Gear In One Safe Place

Diabetes Travel Bag From Myabetic: For When You Really Need All Your Diabetes Gear In One Safe Place

Diabetes Travel Bag from Myabetic: For When You Really Need ALL Your Diabetes Gear in One Safe Place When planning to travel with diabetes , it cant be denied that theres often a little anxiety when you start packing your bags. So many questions running through your head: The average diabetic bag is really meant for day-to-day lifebut the Thompson Travel Carry-All from Myabetic is meant for real traveling and peace of mind! (Due to legal restrictions, participants must live in the USA, UK, Canada, and Australia.) Its Namesake: This bag was named afterLeonard Thompson. When Leonards 14 years old in 1922, explains Myabetic, he was the first person to ever receive an injection of insulin as a treatment for diabetes. *Use the DiabetesDaily code: DDAILY for a 15% discount! Colors & Material: You can purchase this bag inblack leatheror in purple, black or blue nylon. For diabetes jet-setters everywhere! This carry-all is perfect for travel (or for individuals who like to regularly tote extra supplies just in case). Pack all your goods in one organized place, breeze through TSA checkpoints, and set off on your adventure. Dont let diabetes delay your world tour. The center section zips opens completely and includes two mesh zipper pockets, six elastic loops and our signature removable waste pouch for used test strips or other supplies. We also included a large removable zipper pouch (with its own slit pocket for used test strips) to store grab-and-go items for short-term excursions. The two front zipper compartments allow for additional storage, and the back zipper compartment is lined with insulation material to hold a cooling pouch ( like the FRIO, sold separately from FRIO ) to keep your insulin cool. (The FRIO Duo Wallet, FRIO Individual Wallet, FRIO Mini Wallet and FRIO P Continue reading >>

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