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Diabetes Tooth Pain

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS Have you ever felt like your mouth was on fire? This painful sensation can make you feel as if you've scalded your mouth, and can spread to your tongue, gums, lips and inside of your cheeks. According to the Mayo Clinic, this condition is called burning mouth syndrome — it has no visible signs, and it can last from months to years. We do now know that burning mouth syndrome and diabetes can be related, so it's easier to diagnose and treat in diabetics. And it doesn't have to be a life sentence. Here are the common causes of burning mouth syndrome and how to treat them. Possible Causes There are many causes of burning mouth syndrome, and some people, such as diabetics and postmenopausal women, are more likely to suffer from it. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the most common causes include the following: Damage to nerves controlling oral senses such as taste Hormonal changes Nutritional deficiencies Fungal infections in the mouth Acid reflux Dentures that don't fit properly Anxiety and depression With so many possible causes, it's often difficult to clinically point out the culprit in many cases. People with uncontrolled or marginally controlled diabetes can usually narrow down the most probable causes to dry mouth, oral thrush and sometimes neurological abnormalities. Neuropathy (when nerve damage or weakness occurs to the hands and feet) may lead to oral tingling, burning or pain caused by changes in the nerves within the oral region as well. Symptoms and Treatments Moderate to severe burning in the mouth is one of the main symptoms of this disorder. For many people, the burning sensation begins in late morning, builds to a peak by evening, and often subsides at night. Some feel the pain co Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Gums

Diabetes And Your Gums

After five years of writing about diabetes, I still think gum care is among the most important and least appreciated aspects of self-management. Studies keep showing how gum (periodontal) disease and diabetes make each other worse. So are you flossing yet? Severe gum disease (periodontitis) can cause diabetes. According to researchers at Marquette University, “Periodontitis may [raise levels of inflammatory cytokines and serum lipids]… These cytokines can produce an insulin resistance syndrome similar to that observed in diabetes and initiate destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to development of diabetes.” Just as gum disease contributes to diabetes, having diabetes worsens gum conditions. According to the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), “Periodontal disease is often considered the sixth complication of diabetes. Those people who don’t have their diabetes under control are especially at risk.” The link between diabetes and gum disease is that both cause inflammation, not just locally, but through the whole body. Inflammatory cytokines like interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inflame blood vessels, creating small scars. Soon the vessels block up with plaque. These blockage are linked with heart disease, kidney disease, and strokes, all major complications of diabetes. A study from Bangalore, India looked at 200 people, half of whom had recent strokes or heart attacks. Researchers controlled for family history of stroke, diet, smoking and alcohol consumption, diabetes, hypertension, total serum cholesterol level, and education level. Those with worse gums (pocket depths greater than 4.5 millimeters) had far higher risk of strokes. Along with inflammation, infection of the gums creates a vicious diabetes circle. Gum infection Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

How To Get Rid Of A Toothache: Home Remedies & Pain Relief

How To Get Rid Of A Toothache: Home Remedies & Pain Relief

A toothache or tooth pain is most often caused when the nerve to a tooth is irritated, but there are numerous other reasons for a person to experience tooth pain. Risk factors for toothache include dental infection, gum disease, plaque, dental decay, injury, cracked teeth, poorly placed fillings or crowns, failing or leaking fillings or crowns, loss of a tooth (including tooth extractions), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, and obstructive sleep apnea. There are instances, however, where pain originating from outside the mouth radiates to the mouth, thus giving the impression that the pain is of tooth origin. This often happens when there is a problem with the jaw joint (temporomandibular joint or TMJ), ears, nerves, sinuses, or muscles. Occasionally, heart problems can give a sensation of tooth pain. Pregnancy can also be a risk for tooth problems that lead to pain. Due to fluctuating hormone levels during pregnancy, pregnancy gingivitis and tooth decay can occur. One can prevent the majority of dental problems through basic oral hygiene home care -- flossing and brushing. There are many different products, such as xylitol- and fluoride-containing rinses and toothpaste, and having teeth professionally cleaned on a regular schedule. The dentist may apply sealants, varnishes, and fluoride, which are especially important in children but can also be valuable to adults and the elderly, too. Toothaches occur from inflammation of the central portion of the tooth called pulp. The pulp contains nerve endings that are very sensitive to pain. Inflammation to the pulp, or pulpitis, can be caused by anything that has contact with the tooth. Common causes of tooth pain are the following: Toothache and jaw pain are common complaints. It is not unusual for one to feel mild pai Continue reading >>

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

You may have type 2 diabetes istock/FangXiaNuo Red, swollen gums that may bleed are the hallmarks of periodontal disease—an incredibly common condition that affects more than 47 percent of Americans 30 and older and more than 70 percent of adults 65 and older, according to the CDC. Periodontal disease is brought on by bacteria in the mouth that infect the tissues and create plaque. "Diabetes makes periodontal disease worse," says Paulo Camargo, DDS, professor of periodontics and associate dean for clinical dental sciences at UCLA School of Dentistry. "Periodontal disease can also make the blood sugar more difficult to control." Research shows that diabetes is a major risk factor for periodontitis, a more serious form of periodontal disease that can damage soft tissues and destroy the bone that supports teeth. In fact, people with diabetes are three times more susceptible to developing periodontitis than those who aren't diabetic. "If gums bleed a lot and are swollen or the patient is having frequent abscesses or infections, the dentist might start to question if you have a family history of diabetes," says Sally Cram, DDS, a periodontist in Washington, DC, and a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Diabetes isn't the only health problem associated with periodontal disease: The disease, which triggers a harmful, inflammatory response, is also linked to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. These are other type 2 diabetes symptoms you shouldn’t ignore. istock/stevanovicigor Eating garlic knots and forgetting to brush your tongue aren't the only causes of bad breath. In some cases, especially if you already have a solid brushing and flossing regimen in place, a lingering case of halitosis can signal a health problem, such as gastroesophageal reflux dis Continue reading >>

Diabetes Detection By Your Dentist

Diabetes Detection By Your Dentist

Of the 30 million Americans living with diabetes today, more than 8 million don’t even know they have it. The rates are even higher for seniors: approximately 25% are dealing with the effects of diabetes (according to the American Diabetes Association ). With that in mind, it’s good to know that regular trips to the dentist may be the best way to learn if you have diabetes. Dentists are often the first to see signs of a disease because many people don’t go to the doctor when they believe they’re healthy. The dentist’s role in detecting diabetes is an example of how good oral health can improve your overall health. How Dentists Detect Diabetes Oral Yeast Infections One sign of pre-diabetes is frequent yeast infections in the mouth. In diabetics, yeast infections occur when blood glucose levels rise, creating an ideal environment for yeast cells to grow and divide. These kinds of infections are rare in healthy people, so dentists who encounter one look for a cause. Yeast infections can develop as a side effect of antibiotics. But if you’re not taking antibiotics, your dentist will ask more questions to identify what may be additional symptoms of diabetes. These include unexplained weight loss, frequent urination and increased thirst. If you’re experiencing these symptoms along with an oral yeast infection, you might have undiagnosed diabetes. Periodontal Disease An additional warning sign is periodontal or gum disease, a type of bacterial infection that destroys gum and bone tissue. The infection attacks the support structure of the teeth, and can eventually cause tooth loss. This is different from tooth decay, which causes holes to form in your teeth. Diabetics with periodontal disease find it extremely hard to control their blood glucose levels because hig Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

By Laura Martin, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes ? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. ( Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often ( gingivitis ). You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlie Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

Treating Dental Sensitivity

Treating Dental Sensitivity

Does ice cream give your teeth a jolt? What about a hot cup of coffee? On a cold winters day, do you find yourself pressing your lips together to protect your teeth from the cold air? Does the thought of a dental hygienist using a scaler on your teeth make you shudder? These reactions are typical for people with dental sensitivity, which might be more accurately described as hypersensitivity. Sensitivity can result from any number of triggers: most commonly cold but also heat, sugary foods, and physical stimulation. It is extremely common; some studies suggest that more than half of all people experience it. But just because it is common does not mean it should be accepted as a fact of life. However mild or severe, whatever brings it on, dental sensitivity can now be relieved through a variety of treatments. This article gives an overview of what exactly sensitivity is and what you can do about it. A short anatomy lesson will help explain how teeth become sensitive, and how both over-the-counter and professional products work to stop the sensitivity. There are two main parts to each tooth (plus the center, where the main nerve and blood supply are located). The first part of the tooth the crown is the visible part, the part thats used for chewing. The crown is covered by a very hard outer shell called enamel. A bacterial infection or acidic foods can dissolve the enamel, creating tiny holes that can get bigger and lead to the formation of what is commonly called a cavity. If left untreated, a cavity can continue to enlarge until the bacteria and acid reach the nerve and blood supply of the tooth, causing pain. This type of pain is very different from normal sensitivity: It typically hurts more, and its underlying causes are different. If you have pain caused by a cavit Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

People with diabetes have a higher risk of tooth and gum problems. It is important to look after your oral health and control your blood glucose levels to prevent gum disease. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Quit smoking. On this page: People with diabetes who have irregular blood glucose levels have a higher risk of tooth problems and gum disease than people without diabetes. This is because they have lowered resistance to infection and may not heal as easily. If you are living with diabetes, you need to pay particular attention to your oral health and dental care, as well as controlling your blood glucose levels. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Diabetes is a common disease among Australians, affecting almost 1.5 million people (around 7.6 per cent of the population). The first signs and symptoms of diabetes can occur in the mouth, so paying attention to your oral health can also lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. The most common oral health problems affecting people with diabetes are: periodontal (gum) disease gum abscesses tooth decay fungal infections such as thrush lichen planus (an inflammatory, autoimmune skin condition) mouth ulcers taste disturbances a dry, burning mouth (low saliva levels). Diabetes and periodontal (gum) disease Periodontal (gum) disease is caused by an infection that destroys the bone surrounding and supporting your teeth. This bone holds your teeth into your jawbone and allows you to chew comfortably. Bacteria and food debris called dental plaque is essential for gum disease. If left on teeth and gums, plaque hardens to form calculus or tartar. The plaque and calculus irritate the gums around teeth so they become red, swollen a Continue reading >>

Type One And Tooth Pain

Type One And Tooth Pain

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Been diagnosed for one year now everything about it still learning. My main concern at the moment is my teeth. All my life had great teeth always go to dentist brush floss etc. but since diagnosed my gums have receded a lot of them are loose but most importantly they causing me terrible pain. Used to get free dental when my husband got working tax credit now that has stopped obviously have to pay. Well the way it's going with me I'm going to be at the dentist constant how am I supposed to finance this. Also disabled so can't work myself obviously my main concern is the pain cause right now can't sleep but also financial side . Any suggestions pls ButtterflyLady Type 2 Well-Known Member Been diagnosed for one year now everything about it still learning. My main concern at the moment is my teeth. All my life had great teeth always go to dentist brush floss etc. but since diagnosed my gums have receded a lot of them are loose but most importantly they causing me terrible pain. Used to get free dental when my husband got working tax credit now that has stopped obviously have to pay. Well the way it's going with me I'm going to be at the dentist constant how am I supposed to finance this. Also disabled so can't work myself obviously my main concern is the pain cause right now can't sleep but also financial side . Any suggestions pls Which country do you live in? I thought the UK had free dental care but I could be wrong. NZ provides basic dental care for free for people on very low income, and hospital dental care is free. I have gum disease caused by diabetes and I see a hygienist every 6 months for professional cleaning, which is meant to stop it getting Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes Took My Teeth But Not My Life

Diabetes Took My Teeth But Not My Life

Updated 7:02 AM ET, Fri February 21, 2014 Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. CNN Fit Nation's Sia Figiel now stocks up on fruits and vegetables along with lean meats and whole-grain carbohydrates. Sia Figiel is from American Samoa, where food is a big part of the culture Figiel developed diabetes and struggled to manage it Since moving to the United States, Figiel has lost 100 pounds Follow her journey training for a triathlon @TriHardSia I was diagnosed with diabetes 12 years ago. At the time, I was caring for my mother, who was on dialysis and had had her leg amputated. As a family, we knew very little about diabetes -- only that once you got it, you deteriorated and died. Like our father, who suffered a stroke and then died years later of a massive heart attack brought on by complications of diabetes. Both my parents, in fact, died from complications of diabetes. They were strong pillars of our family and community, taken way too soon by a disease that is the leading cause of death among Pacific Islanders. Before seeing the doctor, I had been experiencing extreme thirst, especially at night. The tips of my toes felt like bees lived there and were desperate to burst out of my skin. My vision became blurred after each meal. It was 2 p.m. and I hadn't eaten anything when the doctor tested my blood sugar level. It was in the high 200s. Normal is between 110 and 125. Fit Nation team starts journey to tri 02:30 You have diabetes, Ms. Figiel, the doctor said. He prescribed metformin and directed me to a dietitian. She further reiterated what the doctor had told me: how food was related to high blood glucose levels and how consistently high blood glucose levels will eventually lead to amputations, blindness, kidney fail Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Your Mouth - American Dental Association

Diabetes Symptoms In Your Mouth - American Dental Association

Diabetes takes a toll on your entire body, but it can also increase your risk of dental disease and other symptoms that show up in your mouth. In fact, one in five cases of total tooth loss is linked to diabetes. The good news is you can take charge of your health today. Controlling your blood sugar, brushing, flossing and visiting your dentist regularly can go a long way to help decrease the likelihood of developing these diabetes-related mouth issues. Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease . If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushing , flossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check. Studies have found people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. (Medications and higher blood sugar levels are also causes.) Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities. Your favorite flavors might not taste as rich as your remember if you have diabetes. It can be disappointing, but take the opportunity to experiment with different tastes, textures and spices to your favorite foods. Just take care not to add too much sugar to your food in an effort to add flavor. Not only can this affect the quality of your diet, it can also lead to more cavities. If you have a persistent bad taste in your mouth, see your dentist or doctor. Diabetes affects your immune system, leaving you mo Continue reading >>

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

If you are one of the 16 million Americans with diabetes, you're probably aware that the disease can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. What you may not know is that diabetics are more susceptible to developing oral infections and gum (periodontal) disease than those who do not have diabetes. Diet and tooth decay Your teeth are covered with plaque, a sticky film of bacteria. After you have a meal, snack or beverage that contains sugars or starches, the bacteria release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down and may eventually result in cavities. When diabetes is not controlled properly, high glucose levels in saliva may help bacteria and plaque thrive. Plaque that is not removed can eventually harden into tartar. When tartar collects on your teeth, it makes a thorough cleaning of your teeth more difficult. This can create conditions that lead to chronic inflammation and infection in the mouth. Diabetes lowers your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. What you can do Reduce or eliminate sugars and starches from your diet, eat healthy foods and exercise regularly. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and clean once a day between your teeth with floss or an interdental cleaner to remove decay-causing plaque. Keep teeth and gums strong by keeping track of blood sugar levels. Also, have your triglycerides and cholesterol levels monitored. Treat dental infections immediately. Diabetics who combine good dental care with insulin control typically have a better chance of avoiding gum disease. Provide your medical and oral health histories to both your medical and dental care providers. Continue reading >>

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