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11 Gadgets To Help Manage Diabetes

11 Gadgets To Help Manage Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a full-time job, and you need the right tools for the task. Check out this list of gadgets that can help. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Managing type 2 diabetes is a full-time job, and having the right tools can make it a lot easier. Choosing wisely from the wide array of gadgets on the market can help bring you the best results in managing your diabetes. It's important that you're comfortable with and like the tools you use. When researchers asked 35 people with diabetes to use either a smartphone app or no app to track their blood sugar for 12 weeks, they discovered that the people who said they liked the app they were using also had better A1C numbers . These findings were published in the June 2014 issue of Diabetes & Metabolism Journal . Here are 11 gadgets to consider adding to your diabetes management toolbox: Glucose tablet holder. Because some medications or a new exercise routine can put you at risk for low blood sugar, you want to carry a source of glucose with you, says Betsy Sullivan, RN, a certified diabetes educator with the Penn Rodebaugh Diabetes Center in Philadelphia. If you choose glucose pills, a tablet holder both protects them and makes them easier to find in your purse or bag. Pill organizer. Keeping track of medications and your dosing schedule is easier with a plastic organizer. There are styles with one or more compartments for each day of the week. If you have a smartphone, set an alarm to go off every time you need to take your meds. In the future, you may be able to access a digital pill organizer that can even keep your doctor informed about when you take your medications, according to research published in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Your health care professional can diagnose diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes through blood tests. The blood tests show if your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Do not try to diagnose yourself if you think you might have diabetes. Testing equipment that you can buy over the counter, such as a blood glucose meter, cannot diagnose diabetes. Who should be tested for diabetes? Anyone who has symptoms of diabetes should be tested for the disease. Some people will not have any symptoms but may have risk factors for diabetes and need to be tested. Testing allows health care professionals to find diabetes sooner and work with their patients to manage diabetes and prevent complications. Testing also allows health care professionals to find prediabetes. Making lifestyle changes to lose a modest amount of weight if you are overweight may help you delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Most often, testing for occurs in people with diabetes symptoms. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in children and young adults. Because type 1 diabetes can run in families, a study called TrialNet offers free testing to family members of people with the disease, even if they don’t have symptoms. Type 2 diabetes Experts recommend routine testing for type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older are between the ages of 19 and 44, are overweight or obese, and have one or more other diabetes risk factors are a woman who had gestational diabetes1 Medicare covers the cost of diabetes tests for people with certain risk factors for diabetes. If you have Medicare, find out if you qualify for coverage . If you have different insurance, ask your insurance company if it covers diabetes tests. Though type 2 diabetes most often develops in adults, children also ca Continue reading >>

Tools To Manage Diabetes

Tools To Manage Diabetes

Children with diabetes must work to keep their diabetes in check every day. These resources will help your child and family manage blood sugar testing, highs and lows, insulin, nutrition, and more. as we go through daily life, it feels manageable. it's incredible to learn about the tools and technology that make living with diabetes easier. This tool can be used to help you keep track of your childs blood sugar, carbohydrates and insulin dose. You can also include your childs provider name and circle any blood sugar levels out of your childs target range. A list of supplies that can be used to treat a low blood sugar in children, including glucose tablets, glucose liquids/gels/powders and candy Ketone/Sick Day Rules Insulin Pump [PDF] This resource will help you monitor and regulate insulin and ketones levels for your child with diabetes when he is sick. Learn when to use basal insulin, correction bolus, food bolus and extra fluids depending on your childs blood sugar level and positive ketones. Quick View Ketone Rules: Check, Inject, Drink Keep this ketone rules timeline easily accessible to help you stay on track with managing your ketones anytime you see purple pop up on the urine stick. Print it out, hang it on your fridge, or save the image on your phone! Find information about Precision Xtra, which tests for both blood glucose and blood ketones, and learn about the advantages of checking for blood ketones. This tool will help you learn about the hormone glucagon, which may be prescribed to treat your childs diabetes. Learn about how the drug is administered, when its used and potential side effects. Available in English and Arabic Continue reading >>

Build A Program ~ Developing A Diabetes Self Management Program

Build A Program ~ Developing A Diabetes Self Management Program

Integrating Self Management in Primary Care Programs for self management do not prosper if they rely on the heroic efforts of a few staff members. Rather, organizational factors and system features need to facilitate consistent and high-quality provision of self management support. The Diabetes Initiative identified key characteristics of self management support in primary care and developed a tool that can be used by teams wishing to improve self management supports in their settings. Clinics, community organizations, and other groups can develop partnerships to extend the range and variety of opportunities and supports for self management. These reflect the reality that diabetes management takes place in daily life, not in clinics. The Diabetes Initiative identified key characteristics of effective partnerships and developed tools to help track their progression and improve outcomes. Managing negative emotions is important in diabetes management. A range of strategies to address these include support groups, self management classes, supportive community health workers, counselors on the diabetes care team, medication, and as-needed referral care. But healthy coping isnt just for people with depression. All individuals can benefit from improving their coping skills, and all 14 Diabetes Initiative grantees incorporated this aspect of self management into their programs. For more information on healthy coping, download Healthy Coping in Diabetes: A Guide for Program Development and Implementation . When patients have questions about their diabetes they need convenient access to someone they can talk to. At the same time, they need to be contacted periodically to see how they are doing, even if they havent checked in with their diabetes team. Thus, routine contacts by th Continue reading >>

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

If you've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need some supplies to help you manage your blood sugar. These include: Blood Sugar Meter This device, also called a glucose meter or monitor, measures how much sugar (or glucose) is in a drop of your blood. It can tell you when your sugar is too low or too high. Talk to your doctor about what to do in those situations. Glucose meters can also show you how diet, exercise, stress, sickness, and your medications affect blood sugar. “Get the [one] that you feel comfortable and confident using,” says Jane Seley, a diabetes nurse practitioner at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Make sure the screen is large enough to read. And choose a meter that requires less than a microliter blood sample. “It’s much more comfortable,” Seley says. “You don’t have to stick yourself as deep. It’s much easier to be successful, and you won’t waste as many test strips.” Consider a meter that can download your readings to your smartphone, tablet, or computer. “You can see charts of how your blood sugars differ throughout the day,” Seley says. “It helps you make better decisions about things like when to exercise and what to have for breakfast.” Test Strips, Lancets, and Lancet Device Each small plastic strip contains chemicals that convert the sugar in your blood into an electric current that your meter can read. Wash your hands first, then put a test strip into your meter. Prick the side of your fingertip with a small needle called a lancet. The lancet fits inside a lancet device. About the shape and size of a pen, it’s spring-loaded to help you prick your finger easily with just the right amount of pressure. You then squeeze a single drop of blood onto the strip, and your meter measures the sugar. If you’r Continue reading >>

Two 'incredibly Useful' Tools For Managing Diabetes

Two 'incredibly Useful' Tools For Managing Diabetes

Two 'Incredibly Useful' Tools for Managing Diabetes Today I am going to talk about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). This is a topic I have addressed in the past , but it is a rapidly evolving field and I believe it is important that you understand how CGM is used in diabetes management. The incredibly good news is that Medicare has finally approved reimbursement for CGM for seniors. This has been a battle we have been fighting and advocating for a long time, because until now, when my patients reached the age of 65, they suddenly had to give up their CGMs. This seemed incredibly bad for the patient, because it is our older patients who have more episodes of hypoglycemia. CGM is a great tool for patients because they can monitor for impending episodes of hypoglycemia and do something to prevent them. The approval that Medicare has given is for CGM systems that are in essence strip replacement. To gain Medicare approval, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had to give the device an indication as a replacement for fingerstick testing. The only device currently FDA-approved for this indication is the Dexcom G5 system. Fingerstick replacement means that patients do not have to prick their fingers to get a blood glucose value every time they dose insulin. With this device, a patient can look at the glucose value from the CGM and use this value to calculate the insulin dose. The Dexcom G5 does require two calibrations each day, every 12 hours. Thus, patients must stick their fingers so they can measure their blood sugar levels for these calibrations. It is very important that patients calibrate this device twice a day. But other than those two calibrations, or if they think something is really off about the sensor reading, the patients can just use the sensor for ad Continue reading >>

Laboratory Testing For Diabetes Diagnosis And Management

Laboratory Testing For Diabetes Diagnosis And Management

Laboratory Testing for Diabetes Diagnosis and Management This Test Guide discusses the use of laboratory tests ( Table 1 ) for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and monitoring glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Tools for diagnosing diabetes mellitus include fasting plasma glucose (FPG) measurement, oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), and standardized hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) assays ( Table 2 ). FPG and OGTT tests are sensitive but measure glucose levels only in the short term, require fasting or glucose loading, and give variable results during stress and illness. 1 In contrast, HbA1c assays reliably estimate average glucose levels over a longer term (2 to 3 months), do not require fasting or glucose loading, and have less variability during stress and illness. 1, 2 In addition, HbA1c assays are more specific for identifying individuals at increased risk for diabetes. 1 Clinically significant glucose and HbA1c levels are shown in Table 2 . 1 The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends using these values for diagnosing diabetes and increased diabetes risk (prediabetes). Following a diagnosis of diabetes, a combination of laboratory and clinical tests can be used to monitor blood glucose control, detect onset and progression of diabetic complications, and predict treatment response. Table 3 shows the recommended testing frequency and target results for these tests. Different laboratory tests are available for monitoring blood glucose control over the short, long, and intermediate term to help evaluate the effectiveness of a management plan. 1 Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is useful for tracking short-term treatment responses in insulin-treated patients, but its usefulness is less clear in noninsulin-treated patients. 1 By contrast, the long-term Hb Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Healthcare Professionals | Abbott U.s.

Diabetes | Healthcare Professionals | Abbott U.s.

You are about to exit for another Abbott country or region specific website Please be aware that the website you have requested is intended for the residents of a particular country or region, as noted on that site. As a result, the site may contain information on pharmaceuticals, medical devices and other products or uses of those products that are not approved in other countries or regions. The website you have requested also may not be optimized for your specific screen size. Do you wish to continue and exit this website? You are about to exit the Abbott family of websites for a 3rd party website Links which take you out of Abbott worldwide websites are not under the control of Abbott, and Abbott is not responsible for the contents of any such site or any further links from such site. Abbott is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Abbott. The website that you have requested also may not be optimized for your screen size. Do you wish to continue and exit this website? Continue reading >>

Balancing Diabetes: 10 Clever Tips, Tools And Useful Reminders

Balancing Diabetes: 10 Clever Tips, Tools And Useful Reminders

Balancing Diabetes: 10 Clever tips, tools and useful reminders Balancing Diabetes: 10 Clever tips, tools and useful reminders We all need reminders to help us achieve everything we want in a day. Living with diabetes adds another level of things to remember to do too. It can add up enough that we forget or put off doing some things as regularly as we should (change your lancet recently? yes, I need to as well!) Its great when there are tips or tools that help us remember when to do something or products that make carrying all our stuff a bit easier. Little thing can helps us balance diabetes a bit better. The following are some tips and trick from people with diabetes as well as products that can really help us to stay on top of the assortment of items that accompany us through the day. Hope you find one that helps keep you on top of your diabetes management! Remember to change the Lancet For those who use the typical lancing device that only has one lancet, this tip might help you remember to change it a bit more regularly. In your test strip container, place one lancet (New). When you finish all the test strips in the container, the only thing left will be the lancet and its a reminder to change out the one you have been using.for a while! Remember to change the Infusion site For those who use an insulin pump it is important to change out the infusion site every 2-3 days. This helps to prevent damage to the skin and ensures proper absorption of insulin. A great tool to use is the GoVenture Insulin Pump Timer App . It reminds you when to refill insulin, change infusion sets and do other repetitive tasks when living with diabetes. Emergency Supplies We might pack extra products when traveling, but on a daily basis, do you have extra supplies along in case of a pump fai Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Apps Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Apps Of The Year

We’ve selected these apps based on their quality, user reviews, and overall reliability as a source of support for people living with diabetes. If you want to nominate an app for this list, email us at [email protected] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes impacts 29 million Americans, about 9 percent of the population. Someone with diabetes may experience complications such as kidney problems, blindness, or heart failure, according to the CDC. The good news is that with increased education, people are recognizing symptoms, like going to the bathroom often, having blurry vision, losing weight, experiencing tingling or numbness in lower limbs, and feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired. Thanks to earlier diagnoses, improved treatment tools, and better self-care, people are living better with diabetes. Part of that care includes eating healthy foods, exercising, taking medicines like insulin, sticking to your treatment plan, and being proactive about colds and other sicknesses. Keeping all the pieces of your care plan straightforward can be a challenge, but several apps have emerged to help you track your day and your health. While some of these apps are specifically for diabetes and some are geared for general diet, they can all help you take control of your health. Here are this year’s top picks for the best diabetes apps. iPhone rating: ★★★★★ Android rating: ★★★★★ Price: Free Fooducate promises to be your weight loss coach. This app has a grading system designed to help you make smarter choices. It will help you understand the pros and cons of certain foods. In addition to sugar counts, the app helps you monitor carbs, colorings, mood, hunger, sleep, and exercise. R Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes Tools & Technology

Diabetes treatment has changed considerably over the years with the development of new medical technologies. From talking meters to continuous glucose monitors, learn about some of the recent innovations and find out how they can help you achieve better control. Learn about eight recent diabetes breakthroughs that are changing how the condition is managed Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at insulin delivery devices that have recently hit the market Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at mobile apps, glucose gel, and sweetener Innovative diabetes products aim to make self-management easier. In this installment, we look at glucometers and CGMs that have recently hit the market If you have diabetes, you must consistently monitor your diet, lifestyle, and glucose levels. Fortunately, technology for diabetes can help Heres our lineup of some of the best new diabetes products, tools, and gadgets that have hit the market in the last year Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

On this page: Every day, two more Australian children and as many as six Australians of all ages develop type 1 diabetes, which makes it one of the most common serious diseases among children. Diabetes is a condition of the endocrine system (the system of glands that delivers hormones). To use glucose (blood sugar) for energy, the hormone insulin needs to be secreted by the pancreas, a gland located in the abdomen. A person with type 1 diabetes is unable to produce insulin. Treatment involves closely monitoring blood sugar levels, modifying diet and taking daily injections of insulin. Type 1 diabetes can affect anyone, but is more common in people under 30 years and tends to begin in childhood. Other names for type 1 diabetes have included juvenile diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Approximately one in every ten Australians with diabetes has type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is much more common in Australia than in other countries. The pancreas and type 1 diabetes The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates into glucose. This simple sugar is then transported to each cell via the bloodstream. The pancreas secretes the hormone insulin, which allows the glucose to migrate from the blood into the cells. Once inside a cell, the glucose is ‘burned’, along with oxygen, to produce energy. The pancreas of a person with type 1 diabetes doesn’t make enough insulin to keep blood glucose normal. Without insulin, the glucose remains in the bloodstream at high levels. The body recognises the problem and tries to provide the cells with other sources of fuel, such as stored fats. Extensive fat burning can release by-products called ketones, which are dangerous in high amounts. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes The symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: excessive t Continue reading >>

What Is Brittle Diabetes?

What Is Brittle Diabetes?

Brittle diabetes is a severe form of diabetes. Also called labile diabetes, this condition causes unpredictable swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. These swings can affect your quality of life and even lead to hospitalization. Thanks to advances in diabetes management, this condition is uncommon. However, it can still occur in people with diabetes. In some cases, it’s a sign that your blood sugar is poorly managed. The best way to prevent brittle diabetes is to follow a diabetes care plan created by your doctor. The biggest risk factor for brittle diabetes is having type 1 diabetes. Brittle diabetes occurs mainly in people with type 1 diabetes, and rarely in people with type 2 diabetes. Some doctors classify it as a complication of diabetes, while others consider it a subtype of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). However, your body may have a reaction to insulin, also causing dips in glucose levels. This results in a dangerous “roller coaster” effect. The fluctuation in glucose levels can be rapid and unpredictable, causing dramatic symptoms. In addition to having type 1 diabetes, your risk of brittle diabetes is higher if you: are female have hormonal imbalances are overweight have hypothyroidism (low thyroid) are in your 20s or 30s have a high level of stress on a regular basis have depression Frequent symptoms of low or high blood glucose levels are common indicators of brittle diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can experience these symptoms when their blood sugar levels are off. However, with brittle diabetes, these symptoms occur and change frequently and without warning. Symptoms of very low blood sugar levels include: dizziness weakness irritability extreme hunger trembling hands do Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Technological Innovations - Business Insider

7 Diabetes Technological Innovations - Business Insider

A vertical stack of three evenly spaced horizontal lines. * Copyright 2018 Insider Inc. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our 7 innovations that are changing the way we manage diabetes, a disease that affects 371 million people worldwide It's been almost a century since researchers discovered a way to treat diabetes. Since then, there have been a number of medical and technological advances that aim to make the lives of people living with diabetes both type 1 and type 2 more manageable. Around the globe, the group of conditions affects 371 million people worldwide, a number that's expected to increase to 552 million by 2030 . From monitoring blood sugar levels a taxing experience that people with diabetes must grow used to doing every day to ways that make insulin easier to deliver, here are some of the innovations that are changing the way we manage diabetes. Medtronic created the world's first 'artificial pancreas.' In September, the FDA approved a device that's often referred to as an "artificial pancreas" for use in people with type 1 diabetes over age 14. The device, made by Medtronic, is called the MiniMed 670G, and it works by automatically monitoring a person's blood sugar levels and administering insulin as needed no constant checking and injecting required. That way, it can act like a pancreas, the organ in our bodies that in healthy people is able to moderate our blood sugar levels by pumping out insulin that can process the sugars found in food. Livongo is making a glucose monitor that can get software updates just like your phone. "No one cares about the technology," Glen Tullman, the CEO of California-based startup Livongo and whose son has Type 1 diabetes, told Business Insider. "They simply want to live t Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

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