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Diabetes Tongue Sores

Tongue Problems

Tongue Problems

Numerous problems can affect your tongue, such as: pain sores swelling changes in taste changes in color changes in texture These problems often aren’t serious. However, sometimes your symptoms might occur due to an underlying condition that requires medical treatment. You can prevent many tongue problems by practicing good oral hygiene. If you are already experiencing tongue problems, some simple home remedies may help relieve your symptoms. Possible symptoms that you may experience related to your tongue include: a partial or complete loss of taste or changes in your ability to taste sour, salty, bitter, or sweet flavors difficulty moving your tongue a change from the normal color of your tongue or patches of color that are white, bright pink, black, or brown pain either all over the tongue or only in certain spots a burning sensation either all over the tongue or only in certain spots white or red patches, which are often painful a furry or hairy appearance of the tongue The specific symptoms you’re experiencing will help your doctor identify the cause of your tongue problem. Causes of a burning sensation on the tongue A burning sensation on the tongue may occur in women who are postmenopausal. It can also occur due to exposure to irritants, such as cigarette smoke. Causes of a change in tongue color A bright pink color on the tongue is most often due to a deficiency in iron, folic acid, or vitamin B-12. An allergic reaction to gluten can also cause this. A white tongue is usually a result of smoking, drinking alcohol or poor oral hygiene. White lines or bumps may be an inflammation called oral lichen planus. People think this occurs due to an abnormal immune response that may occur from an underlying condition, such as hepatitis C or allergies. Causes of a chang Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Dry Mouth And Diabetes

What You Should Know About Dry Mouth And Diabetes

One of the most common symptoms of diabetes is dry mouth, or xerostomia. Dry mouth is a common symptom in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Not everyone with diabetes will experience it, though. You can also have dry mouth if you don’t have diabetes. If you have dry mouth and suspect you might have diabetes, you should talk to your primary care doctor. Dry mouth occurs due to a reduced amount of saliva in your mouth. The symptoms of dry mouth include: a rough, dry tongue a lack of moisture in the mouth frequent pain in the mouth cracked and chapped lips sores in the mouth infections in the oral cavity difficulty with swallowing, talking, or chewing Anyone can get dry mouth, but it’s a common symptom of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The exact reasons are unknown, but high blood sugar levels could cause dry mouth in people with diabetes. Some medications used to treat diabetes can also cause dry mouth. Other causes of dry mouth include: dehydration kidney dialysis breathing through the mouth Read more: Type 2 diabetes and oral health » Dry mouth isn’t well-understood because there hasn’t been much research in the area. One meta-analysis reviewed studies from 1992 to 2013, but the researchers were unable to determine any definitive causes for dry mouth from the study results. You may be able to improve your symptoms of dry mouth at home. Some home remedies include: avoiding food and drinks with a lot of sugar, caffeine, or artificial sweeteners drinking a lot of water flossing after every meal eating high-fiber fruits and vegetables using toothpicks to scrape excess plaque off your teeth using alcohol-free mouthwash chewing gum brushing your teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste sucking on mints that contain xylitol, which freshens the breath You’ll n Continue reading >>

Slideshow: Diabetes And Your Mouth

Slideshow: Diabetes And Your Mouth

4 Signs You May Have a Problem Diabetes puts you at risk for dental problems. It hurts your ability to fight bacteria in your mouth. Having high blood sugar encourages bacteria to grow and contributes to gum disease. You may have gum disease if you have: Gums that are red, sore, bleeding, or swollen, or that pull away from your teeth Loose teeth Chronic bad breath An irregular bite or dentures that don't fit well Well-controlled diabetes helps keep your mouth healthy. If you have poorly controlled or high blood sugar, you have a higher chance of dry mouth, gum disease, tooth loss, and fungal infections like thrush. Since infections can also make your blood sugar rise, your diabetes may become harder to control. Keeping your mouth healthy can help you manage your blood sugar. People with diabetes are more likely to have oral infections. You should get dental checkups at least twice a year. Let your dentist know you have diabetes and what medicines you take. Regular checkups and professional cleanings can help keep a mouth healthy. And your dentist can teach you the best ways to care for your teeth and gums at home. Sticky plaque -- food, saliva, and bacteria -- starts to form on your teeth after you eat, releasing acids that attack tooth enamel. Untreated plaque turns into tartar, which builds under gum lines and is hard to remove with flossing. The longer it stays on your teeth, the more harmful it is. Bacteria in plaque causes inflammation and leads to gum disease. High blood sugar can make gum disease worse. When you brush your teeth twice a day, it not only keeps your breath fresh, but it also helps rid your mouth of bacteria that makes up plaque and can lead to infections. To brush properly, point your bristles at a 45-degree angle against your gums. Use gentle back Continue reading >>

Are Frequent Urination, Swollen Tongue And Dry Mouth Symptoms Of Diabetes?

Are Frequent Urination, Swollen Tongue And Dry Mouth Symptoms Of Diabetes?

Yes, diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes) is my initial concern with these symptoms. A simple finger prick for a blood sugar test will likely provide the diagnosis. If the blood sugar is 200 or higher, then he has diabetes. If it is less than 100, he will need to consider other reasons for his symptoms. For blood sugar in the 101 to 199 zone, know that diabetes becomes more likely as the level gets closer to 200. Less common causes for these symptoms: Diabetes insipidus. The kidneys can't hold onto water because of abnormally low levels of anti-diuretic hormone. High blood calcium level (hypercalcemia). The kidney needs to put out a lot of extra water to deal with the extra calcium. Medications, mouth breathing or low saliva production can lead to a very dry mouth. Dry mouth can lead to excessive fluid intake, which increases how much urine the kidneys make. Kidney disease. In some types of kidney diseases, the kidneys can't hold on to water properly. Thirst is the way we prevent dehydration. An abnormal craving for water (called psychogenic polydipsia). People with this rare disorder drink huge amounts of water all the time. They actually can temporarily damage their kidneys. Harvard Medical School Diabetes: A plan for living Nearly 24 million Americans roughly one of every 13 people have diabetes, a disease marked by high levels of sugar in the blood. More than 90% of them have type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body... Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Your Mouth - American Dental Association

Diabetes Symptoms In Your Mouth - American Dental Association

Diabetes takes a toll on your entire body, but it can also increase your risk of dental disease and other symptoms that show up in your mouth. In fact, one in five cases of total tooth loss is linked to diabetes. The good news is you can take charge of your health today. Controlling your blood sugar, brushing, flossing and visiting your dentist regularly can go a long way to help decrease the likelihood of developing these diabetes-related mouth issues. Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease . If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushing , flossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check. Studies have found people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. (Medications and higher blood sugar levels are also causes.) Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities. Your favorite flavors might not taste as rich as your remember if you have diabetes. It can be disappointing, but take the opportunity to experiment with different tastes, textures and spices to your favorite foods. Just take care not to add too much sugar to your food in an effort to add flavor. Not only can this affect the quality of your diet, it can also lead to more cavities. If you have a persistent bad taste in your mouth, see your dentist or doctor. Diabetes affects your immune system, leaving you mo Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Dry Mouth

Diabetes-related Dry Mouth

Individuals suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes are at risk of developing dry mouth symptoms. Abnormal insulin production and/or absorption rates, which occur in diabetes, can cause the salivary glands to not release adequate amounts of saliva. According to experts, diabetes is likely the most frequent metabolic disease with salivary implications, due to the ever increasing numbers of people impacted by the disease. In 2016, there were more than 29 million people in the U.S. with diabetes, and 86 million with pre-diabetes, a serious health condition that increases one's risk of developing type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. Patients with dry mouth symptoms often have difficulty with many aspects of eating and swallowing. Denture wearers with diabetes may develop sores or have problems keeping dentures comfortably in place. In addition to dry mouth, many people with diabetes can experience taste disorders, excessive thirst, or a painful tongue. Facts and Stats Although research has shown that dry mouth symptoms are frequent among people with diabetes, most studies have not conclusively demonstrated that these rates are higher than in people without diabetes. This is not an exact science because there are many co-occurring health conditions that are contributing factors to developing dry mouth. Other factors that can cause salivary disorders in people with diabetes include advanced age, head and neck radiotherapy, systemic disorders, and several drugs. The following facts and stats are gathered from recent research. dry mouth symptoms associated with parotid gland enlargement affects nearly 25% of patients suffering from moderate to severe type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The parotid gland is the larger one of the two salivary glands, responsible for releasing sal Continue reading >>

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

Xerostomia is an ominous sounding name for a fairly common condition suffered by approximately 20% of the population, one that most people tend to underestimate, a dry mouth. In essence, having a dry mouth means the body is not producing enough saliva, which helps the mouth stay clean while removing harmful bacteria that can cause cavities and other painful infections in the mouth. Saliva neutralizes the acid in the mouth and is an important part of the digestive process as it provides the moisture needed to chew and swallow food. Dry Mouth Causes There are many causes of dry mouth, such as not drinking enough liquid during the day, smoking, and sleeping with your mouth open, among others. Dry mouth can also be caused by certain types of medication, such ADHD medicine, anti-histamines, antidepressants, sleep medications, and narcotics. When this is the case, the problem tends to disappear once the underlying cause is removed, meaning that a dry mouth is usually nothing more than a temporary problem with an easy fix. However, for individuals suffering from diabetes, having a dry mouth can be more than just a mild annoyance. Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes A dry mouth can exacerbate the side effects of diabetes, which will then lead to an increase in glucose levels, wreaking havoc on the body. A dry mouth is not only a symptom of high blood sugar, but it can also be the cause of it. Having a dry mouth, especially as a diabetic, can lead to rampant tooth decay, which means blood sugar increases as the body tries, and fails, to fight infection. A dry mouth can also lead to loss of sleep and an altered sense of taste, a condition that presents with a metallic or sour taste in the mouth. Treatments for Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes Because of the harmful effects of having a dry m Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Sore Tongue

Diabetes-related Causes Of Sore Tongue

Our information shows that 2 causes of Sore tongue are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 112 total causes). These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Sore tongue if the patient has diabetes, is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Angina - angina occasionally causes tongue pain Mouth conditions - Mouth ulcer More Information on Diabetes All Causes of Sore tongue The full list of all possible causes for Sore tongue described in various sources is as follows: Adam and Eve poisoning - burning tongue After anesthetic Amyloidosis - tongue inflammation Anemia - tongue inflammation Anemia, hypochromic microcytic - sore tongue See full list of possible disease causes of Sore tongue Drug side effect causes of Sore tongue The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Sore tongue as a side effect. Ceporex Capace Sodium Aurothiomalate Myocrisin Injection Aurothiogluccose [See detailed list of 13 drug side effect causes of Sore tongue] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Sore tongue: The following list of conditions have 'Sore tongue' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Sore tongue or choose View All. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Tongue - Could It Be A Diagnostic Criterion?

Diabetic Tongue - Could It Be A Diagnostic Criterion?

Go to: Discussion Studies that have shown an increase in prevalence of diabetes in India have also reported a very high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes in the community. The individuals who are unaware of their disease status are left untreated only to present at a later stage with complications. The disease tends to progress more rapidly in individuals not receiving appropriate intervention. Hence, it is necessary to detect them early and provide necessary treatment.[2] Taste disorders form a common part of presentation of several diseases. Taste loss may occur in physiological conditions like ageing, pregnancy, and menopause. Patients with xerostomia, Sjögren's syndrome, and zinc deficiency also experience taste loss. Other conditions in which taste loss may occur include liver and kidney disorders, DM, depression, and surgical procedures around the chorda tympani or glossopharyngeal nerve. Patients with head trauma and epilepsy may also experience taste loss. Numerous drugs (methotrexate, dexamethasone, antihypertensives, and antimicrobial agents) have been associated with taste loss.[3] Taste disorders have been described in the past during the course of DM. Le Floch et al.,[4] in 1989 had mentioned about the decrease of the diabetic individual's ability to detect and recognize the primary taste modalities. An Indian study in 2012 evaluating 50 cases of DM with oral complications found taste impairment in 20% cases.[5] Another Indian study found that taste alteration was more common in uncontrolled diabetics than in controlled diabetics.[6] Electrogustometric examination in 73 patients from Czech Republic showed that about 40% of type 2 DM have hypoguesia and 5% have aguesia.[7] A 2009 Spanish study concluded that hyperglycemia induces a concentration-dependent Continue reading >>

Burning Mouth Syndrome

Burning Mouth Syndrome

Print Overview Burning mouth syndrome is the medical term for ongoing (chronic) or recurrent burning in the mouth without an obvious cause. This discomfort may affect the tongue, gums, lips, inside of your cheeks, roof of your mouth or widespread areas of your whole mouth. The burning sensation can be severe, as if you scalded your mouth. Burning mouth syndrome can appear suddenly or develop gradually over time. Unfortunately, the cause often can't be determined. Although that makes treatment more challenging, you can often get burning mouth syndrome under better control by working closely with your health care team. Symptoms Symptoms of burning mouth syndrome may include: A burning or scalded sensation that most commonly affects your tongue, but may also affect your lips, gums, palate, throat or whole mouth A sensation of dry mouth with increased thirst Taste changes, such as a bitter or metallic taste Loss of taste The discomfort from burning mouth syndrome typically has several different patterns. It may: Occur every day, with little discomfort when you wake, but become worse as the day progresses Start as soon as you wake up and last all day Come and go Whatever pattern of mouth discomfort you have, burning mouth syndrome may last for months to years. In rare cases, symptoms may suddenly go away on their own or become less frequent. Some sensations may be temporarily relieved during eating or drinking. Burning mouth syndrome usually doesn't cause any noticeable physical changes to your tongue or mouth. When to see a doctor If you have discomfort, burning or soreness of your tongue, lips, gums or other areas of your mouth, see your doctor or dentist. They may need to work together to help pinpoint a cause and develop an effective treatment plan. Causes The cause of b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

Sore Tongue: Symptoms & Signs

Sore Tongue: Symptoms & Signs

A number of different conditions can result in pain and/or the presence of abnormalities, bumps, ulcers, or sores or spots on the tongue as well as symptoms like pain, swelling, or burning of the tongue. Problems with the tongue can result from infections, tumors, chronic medical conditions, trauma, or toxins. Inflammation of the tongue is medically known as glossitis. Pain in the tongue is known as glossodynia. Inflammation may occur on the sides of the tongue, the tip of the tongue, on the back of the tongue, or throughout the tongue. Because soreness or painful lesions on the tongue can have a wide variety of causes, treatment and outlook depend upon the particular condition that is responsible. Depending upon the exact cause, other symptoms and conditions can be associated with a sore tongue, including Inflammation of the tongue can lead to damage of the taste buds, tiny sensors on the surface of the tongue. Some of the more common causes of sore or painful tongue include canker sores, cold sores, bite injuries, and burns. In some cases, pain that originates in other sources (such as cardiac angina or problems with the teeth and/or jaws) can be experienced in the tongue, even though the tongue itself is normal. This is known as referred pain. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that can affect the whole body — your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart, and other important systems in the body. It can also affect your mouth. People with diabetes face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems. Why are people with diabetes more likely to develop oral health problems? The link between diabetes and oral health problems is high blood sugar. If blood sugar is poorly controlled, oral health problems are more likely to develop. This is because uncontrolled diabetes weakens white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infections that can occur in the mouth. Just as studies have shown that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of major organ complications of diabetes — such as eye, heart, and nerve damage — so to can diabetes control protect against the development of oral health problems. Specifically, what are some of these oral health problems? Dry mouth: Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease saliva flow, resulting in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay. Gum inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontitis: Besides weakening white blood cells, another complication of diabetes is that it causes blood vessels to thicken. This slows the flow of nutrients to and waste products from body tissues, including the mouth. When this combination of events, the body loses its ability to fight infections. Since periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, people with uncontrolled diabetes might experience more frequent and more severe gum disease. Poor healing of oral tissues: People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatment site can be damaged. Thrush: People with diabetes Continue reading >>

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS Have you ever felt like your mouth was on fire? This painful sensation can make you feel as if you've scalded your mouth, and can spread to your tongue, gums, lips and inside of your cheeks. According to the Mayo Clinic, this condition is called burning mouth syndrome — it has no visible signs, and it can last from months to years. We do now know that burning mouth syndrome and diabetes can be related, so it's easier to diagnose and treat in diabetics. And it doesn't have to be a life sentence. Here are the common causes of burning mouth syndrome and how to treat them. Possible Causes There are many causes of burning mouth syndrome, and some people, such as diabetics and postmenopausal women, are more likely to suffer from it. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the most common causes include the following: Damage to nerves controlling oral senses such as taste Hormonal changes Nutritional deficiencies Fungal infections in the mouth Acid reflux Dentures that don't fit properly Anxiety and depression With so many possible causes, it's often difficult to clinically point out the culprit in many cases. People with uncontrolled or marginally controlled diabetes can usually narrow down the most probable causes to dry mouth, oral thrush and sometimes neurological abnormalities. Neuropathy (when nerve damage or weakness occurs to the hands and feet) may lead to oral tingling, burning or pain caused by changes in the nerves within the oral region as well. Symptoms and Treatments Moderate to severe burning in the mouth is one of the main symptoms of this disorder. For many people, the burning sensation begins in late morning, builds to a peak by evening, and often subsides at night. Some feel the pain co Continue reading >>

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