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Diabetes And Subjective Tinnitus

Diabetes And Subjective Tinnitus

Subjective tinnitus is the form of “ringing in the ears” that can only be heard by the person who has it. While the most common type of tinnitus, it is also the one for which one specific cause can rarely be identified. That’s because subjective tinnitus is a symptom of numerous ear disorders and other medical conditions, including vascular disorders, glucose metabolic problems, and diabetes. Contributing factors to tinnitus in diabetics Approximately 30 million people in the U.S. alone have a form of diabetes, a group of diseases that affect your body’s ability to properly use an excess amount of glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream. Of these, an estimated 34.5 million also have some type of hearing loss, which is twice as common in diabetics as in people without the disease. While hearing loss and tinnitus occur independently of one another, in many cases the root cause of one also leads to the other. Three potential triggers for hearing damage and subjective tinnitus in people with diabetes include the following: Inadequate blood flow, a known complication of diabetes. When blood sugar increases, it thickens your blood and makes it very difficult to pass through the tiny capillaries of your cochlea (inner ear). This restricted blood flow damages and eventually destroys the fragile stereocilia (hair cells) that conduct sound from your cochlea to your auditory cortex for processing. The more of them you lose, the less you’re able to hear and process external sounds properly. Exposure to high blood sugar over a long time can damage the eighth cranial nerve, which is responsible for transmitting sound and balance information from your inner ear to the brain. Even slightly elevated blood sugar over time can interfere with the enzyme known as the ATPase pump, whic Continue reading >>

Acme What People With Diabetes Should Know About Allergies

Acme What People With Diabetes Should Know About Allergies

What People with Diabetes Should Know About Allergies Also indexed as:Ears (Ringing), Ringing in the Ears Roaring or ringing in your ears may mask other sounds and make it difficult to sleep. What can you do to tame tinnitus and hear clearly again? According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful. Rarely, tinnitus is due to an actual sound, such as blood rushing through an enlarged veina problemthat requires medical treatment. More commonly the problem is due to nerve irritation from an unknown sourceor an underlying ear problem often induced by noise damage. The cause of tinnitus should be diagnosed by adoctor. Symptoms may include hearing buzzing, roaring, ringing, whistling, or hissing sounds. These sounds may be intermittent, continuous, or pulsing. Tinnitus may interfere with normal activities and sleep, and there may be an associated decrease in the ability to hear conversation or other sounds in the environment. Acupuncture has been studied as a treatment for tinnitus in several controlled trials. Preliminary trials have reported improvement in symptoms of tinnitus following acupuncture treatment, but this relief was either not permanent or did not reach statistical significance.1 Most trials have shown no advantage of acupuncture treatment over placebo for the treatment of tinnitus.2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 A review of clinical trials concluded that acupuncture is not an effective treatment for tinnitus.9 Continue reading >>

Tinnitus: 5 Strange Reasons For Ringing Ears

Tinnitus: 5 Strange Reasons For Ringing Ears

Ringing in your ears, known as tinnitus , may not seem like a big deal. But for many, its an annoying condition that can drive you to distraction and affect your life. Thankfully, there are several ways to relieve the problem. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Its also a common complaint. Nearly 50 million Americans report some type of tinnitus, according to audiologist Craig Newman, PhD , Vice Chair and Section Head of Cleveland ClinicsAllied Hearing, Speech and Balance Services. For about 42 million people, the problem is bothersome and/or chronic. They have problems, such as sleep disturbance, and they may experience anxiety or depression, he says. Many also have concentration difficulties. Physicians and audiologists dont always know the exact cause of tinnitus. Excessive noise exposure is a common cause. Do you work in a noisy environment, such as a factory or construction site? Or perhaps you listen to loud music constantly or use power tools?Exposure to loud sounds puts your ears at risk. Whether youre young or old, its a good idea to take steps to protect your ears. To reduce your risk, physically remove yourself from loud sounds, turn down the volume or wear hearing protection. Lesser known potential causes of tinnitus include: 1. Ear wax.Something as simple as a buildup of ear wax in your inner ear may cause your ears to ring. Your doctor can remove the wax to eliminate the ringing. 2. Medications.Some medicines may affect your ears. High doses of aspirin, certain antibiotics and antidepressants may cause tinnitus. Chemotherapy drugs also may affect your ears. Check with your primary care physician to determine if any Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes On Hearing And Cochlear Structures

Effects Of Diabetes On Hearing And Cochlear Structures

Volume 8, Issue 2 , December 2013, Pages 82-87 Effects of Diabetes on Hearing and Cochlear Structures Author links open overlay panel LiXipeng1 LiRuiyu2 Open Access funded by PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic systemic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, with various pathogenic mechanisms. From absolute or relative insulin deficiency, patients with DM often demonstrate various levels of metabolic disorders. Major clinical manifestations of DM include metabolic disorders, vascular lesions, circulatory disturbances and neurologic complications. Along with advances in DM research, reports of DM related tinnitus and hearing impairment have increased continuously. Research on DM related auditory system dysfunction has focused on cochlear microcirculation, cellular homeostasis, genetics and aging. Cochlear microcirculation plays an important role in cochlear physiology and its disorders are associated with many inner ear diseases. Ischemia and subsequent reperfusion seen in cochlear microcirculation disorders are important factors in hearing damage. Understanding cochlear microcirculation and structural as well as functional changes in DM patients with hearing loss and their causal factors will help reveal pathogenic mechanisms in diabetic hearing loss and provide new ideas in developing interventions and preventing damages caused by diabetes. Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Will Make Your Tinnitus Symptoms Worse

10 Foods That Will Make Your Tinnitus Symptoms Worse

Home / Tinnitus Symptoms / 10 Foods That Will Make Your Tinnitus Symptoms Worse 10 Foods That Will Make Your Tinnitus Symptoms Worse This list of 10 foods that will make your tinnitus symptoms worse is not a scientific study, by any measure. And I am not a doctor. If anything, Im little more than a person with tinnitus who also happens to be pretty good at using Google. And Ive used my Google Genius powers to assemble this list of foods (except one, I kinda cheated a bit there) that are suspected to cause or exacerbate the symptoms people with tinnitus have typically. Please understand, Im not trying to change you. Only you have the power to do that. What Im suggesting is that you take a look at the foods on this list and consider if you might like to experiment with reducing or removing them from your diet for a trial period, say 7-30 days. If you dont see any improvement in the loud noise perceived, then you know that food item is not the culprit for the tinnitus sounds. Also, some of the items on this list are somewhat controversial and, typically, arguments for either side make perfect sense. I am not taking one side or the other here. Tinnitus is whats considered a heterogeneous condition. What that means is that my tinnitus isnt like your tinnitus. As such, I cant tell you what tinnitus treatment option is best for you to get rid of yours, just as Id like you to abstain from telling me whats right and wrong with my individual approach. My humble advice is to consider each item on this list and draw your own conclusions about what direction youd like to take in the treatment of your own condition. Salt restricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure. Almost immediately after consuming salt, blood flow is restricted to the ears, eyes and brain. Most of the sal Continue reading >>

The Return Of Dr. Kenneth Brookler In Hd - Enjoy! #lchf #insulin #tinnitus #diabetes

The Return Of Dr. Kenneth Brookler In Hd - Enjoy! #lchf #insulin #tinnitus #diabetes

Fat Emperor Special: A delightful conversation with Dr. Brookler on tinnitus, inner ear disorders, hyperinsulinemia and the pivotal work of Dr. Joseph Kraft. We also cover some of the many issues around modern research bias, and knowledge gaps in the medical community with respect to chronic disease root cause. Enjoy, and subscribe for free to www.thefatemperor.com/subscribe for future content, including exclusive interviews with Professor Richard Feinman....and the great Dr. Joseph Kraft himself! Note: for a primer on the incredible work of Dr. Kraft, see . Dr. Kraft's work on the accurate diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia/diabetes has been described as 'unparalled in medicine'. This is entirely appropriate. He developed the perfect unambiguous test for occult/manifest diabetes in the early 1970's, transcending the 40 years of advanced testing that has been developed since to indicate the dysfunction. As an expert pathologist, his >3000 personally executed autopsy examinations exposed the extent of diabetic vascular disease, from the kidney right through to all the major and minor vessels. 'The pathology of diabetes IS the pathology of vascular disease and atherosclerosis'. Those with cardiovascular disease not identified with diabetes....are simply undiagnosed. But undiagnosed they need not be, if you deploy Kraft's test. A cohort within the ENT community have the honour of recognising the crucial importance of this work. Dr. Brookler is chief amongst them. Continue reading >>

Health And Wellness Portal | Children's Hospital Vanderbilt | Diabetes And Other Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders | Tinnitus (ringing In The Ears)

Health And Wellness Portal | Children's Hospital Vanderbilt | Diabetes And Other Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders | Tinnitus (ringing In The Ears)

Treatment may include maskers and hearing aids. Tinnitus is the term for a noise in your ear not caused by an outside sound. The noise might be a ringing, clicking, hiss, or roar. It can vary in pitch and may be soft or quite loud. For some people, tinnitus is a minor nuisance. But for others, the noise can make it hard to hear, work, and even sleep. When tinnitus can't be cured, a number of treatments may offer relief. Loud noises, hearing loss, and ear wax can cause tinnitus. So can certain medicines. Large amounts of aspirin or caffeine are sometimes to blame. In many cases, the exact cause of tinnitus is unknown. Identifying and removing the cause is the best way to treat tinnitus. For that reason, your healthcare provider may refer you to an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat doctor). Your hearing may also be checked by an audiologist (hearing specialist). If you have hearing loss, wearing a hearing aid may help your tinnitus. When the cause can't be found, the tinnitus itself may be treated. Some of the treatments are listed below, and your healthcare provider can tell you more about them: Maskers are small devices that look like hearing aids. They emit a pleasant sound that helps cover up the ringing in your ears. Hearing aids and maskers are sometimes used together. Medicines that treat anxiety and depression may ease tinnitus in some people. Hypnosis or relaxation therapy may help head noise seem less severe. Tinnitus retraining therapy combines counseling and maskers. Both can help take your mind off the tinnitus. American Speech-Hearing-Language Association 800-638-8255 www.asha.org American Tinnitus Association 800-634-8978 www.ata.org National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders 800-241-1044 www.nidcd.nih.gov Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Tinnitus Complaints And Probable Association With Hearing Loss, Diabetes Mellitus And Hypertension In Elderly

Prevalence Of Tinnitus Complaints And Probable Association With Hearing Loss, Diabetes Mellitus And Hypertension In Elderly

PURPOSE: To assess the prevalence of tinnitus and possible association with hearing loss, diabetes mellitus and hypertension in elderly. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with individuals older than 60 years who underwent audiological evaluation (pure tone audiometry and history) and answered a comorbidity questionnaire. We evaluated 519 subjects of both genders with a median age of 69 years. Individuals who did not participate in the audiometric test were excluded, then totaling 498 subjects. We applied the appropriate statistical tests to analyze the tinnitus and associated factors. RESULTS: The prevalence of 42.77% of tinnitus was found, being 58.68% bilateral tinnitus and 41.31% unilateral tinnitus. There was a difference between tinnitus and hearing loss, but there was no difference between tinnitus and hypertension and between tinnitus and diabetes mellitus alone. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of tinnitus is significant in the elderly. There are differences between tinnitus and hearing loss, with association between the side affected by tinnitus and the side of hearing loss. Only the association of comorbidity of diabetes mellitus and hypertension is an independent risk factor for tinnitus. Keywords: Tinnitus; Diabetes mellitus; Hypertension; Hearing loss; Aged Hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo are associated with smoking, high blood pressure (hypertension), diabetes mellitus (DM), lifestyle, age, health history, leisure activities and occupational exposures, and the incidence of auditory symptoms seems correlated with noise exposure during lifetime(1-6). Presbycusis, which has been cited as the third most chronic condition reported by the elderly, can be defined as the hearing loss associated with aging, reflecting the loss of auditory sensitivity associated with adv Continue reading >>

Diabetes: A Risk Factor For Hearing Loss

Diabetes: A Risk Factor For Hearing Loss

home Diabetes: A Risk Factor for Hearing Loss There has been a link between diabetes and hearing loss since the 1960s, but no real pinpoint to a possible cause was found until just a few years ago. In 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conducted a study that showed hearing loss is about twice as common in adults with diabetes than with those who do not have the disease. After testing over 4,700 participants ability to hear a range of frequencies in both ears, there was a strong correlation found between diabetes and hearing loss across all frequencies, especially in the high-frequency range. Of the participants with diabetes, 54 percent reported a hearing loss for high-frequency sounds. Of the participants without diabetes 32 percent reported a hearing loss for high-frequency sounds. So why is it that diabetes affects hearing loss risk? Some researchers suggest that hearing loss in diabetics is due to poor circulation. Elevated blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels thereby reducing blood flow to certain areas and subsequently cause damages to the structures of the inner ear which are highly vascularized and do not have a backup supply of blood flow. Thus, hearing loss could be the result of permanent damages to the blood vessels in the inner ear. The American Diabetes Association theorizes that a person with a higher percentage of glycated hemoglobin, or A1c, possesses a greater risk of developing hearing loss in the future. A recent Japanese study presents evidence that hearing loss may be related to A1c levels. The current global prevalence of diabetes is estimated to be 9 percent among adults and is estimated to affect nearly one third of the worlds population by the year 2050 . Diabetes is becoming an extremely common disease, making it a larger co Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Tinnitus In Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus With Or Without Hypertension Patients In Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre

Prevalence Of Tinnitus In Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus With Or Without Hypertension Patients In Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre

N2 - Objective: Tinnitus is perception of sound without external stimulus. Our main objective is to determine the prevalence of tinnitus in Type II diabetes mellitus patients with or without hypertension in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. We would also evaluate the quality of life of these patients. The association between tinnitus and glycaemic control and the association with renal function were also looked into. Design: A cross sectional study was conducted from May to July 2015 among 186 respondents with type II diabetes mellitus with or without hypertension using random sampling from the Endocrine clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) Materials and Methods: The respondents were assessed using Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and laboratory results including HbA1c and renal function were used. Those patients with tinnitus also had pure tone audiometry test to determine the hearing levels. Results: Respondents consisted of 75 males (40.3%) and 111 females (59.7%) with mean age of 60.99 11.6 years old. The racial distribution was 104 Malay (55.9%), 52 Chinese (28.0%), 27 Indian (14.5%) and 3 others (1.6%). The prevalence of patients with tinnitus was 9.1% (17 patients). There was no significant association observed between tinnitus and glycaemic control (p = 0.850) and the severity of renal function calculated from glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.253). Among 17 patients with tinnitus, 10 (58.82%) had grade 1 tinnitus severity, 5 (29.41%) had grade 2 and only 2 (11.76%) had grade 4 tinnitus severity. Conclusion: There was a small percentage of tinnitus in patient with background diabetes. There was no significant association between tinnitus and type II diabetes mellitus or severity of renal function. Tinnitus did not cause a Continue reading >>

Tinnitus- A Symptom Not To Be Ignored

Tinnitus- A Symptom Not To Be Ignored

That irritating sound that no one but only you can hear is sufficient to drive anybody crazy. Despite the fact that specialists may not believe that it is as severe as other health conditions, for example, tumor or diabetes, tinnitus can really be unbearable for the individual. It is viewed more as a manifestation of a more profound issue in the body than as actual sickness. These are noises and sounds that you hear from time to time or always without a source, and that can disturb your attention and sleeping patterns. The sounds can be varied from whining, murmuring, ringing, tweeting, chirping, screeching, thundering, and so forth. The point that is disappointing that no one but you can hear these sounds most of the time. The only case in which someone else usually a specialist might be able to hear these sounds is when you usually experience the ill effects of pulsatile tinnitus which will involve you hearing the rhythm of your heartbeat. Utilizing a hearing gadget connected to your ear, the specialist might have the capacity to hear these sounds as well. Pulsatile tinnitus causes incorporate experiencing uneasiness or stress, experiencing hypertension, wretchedness, having tumors in neck or head, and so on. Two kinds of this condition can influence the listening ability of an individual. These are: Your manifestations will rely upon which kind of tinnitus you are encountering. Objective tinnitus can hear by a doctor analyzing the ear and now and again by someone else standing near the ear of the individual having this condition. This type normally causes by a vascular issue or even a muscular disorder with the sounds keeping in sync with the heartbeat. Objective tinnitus can typically treat with either surgery or medicines. Subjective tinnitus is the more common ty Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Celiac Disease And Tinnitus – The Vitamin B12 Link

Diabetes, Celiac Disease And Tinnitus – The Vitamin B12 Link

Research has shown that tinnitus can be caused by a vitamin B12 deficiency. B12 deficiency is also a common complication in diabetes and celiac disease as they both share the inability to absorb B12 properly. People who have celiac disease and type II diabetes also have higher rates of nerve-damage related conditions like tinnitus. In addition, the older you get, the more at risk you may be for developing both a B12 deficiency and tinnitus. Why? As you get older, you lose a great deal of your ability to absorb B12 from your food through your intestine. Recent research has shown that if you are a type II diabetic who takes metformin you are also at higher risk of B12 deficiency. Metformin, a drug which normalizes insulin usage, can have a side effect of frequent diarrhea or loose stools. With those side effects, you can lose a lot of B12 from your foods. In a 2009 study, 40% of metformin users had B12 deficiencies. Another 77% had peripheral neuropathy, a common type of nerve damage also aggravated by B12 deficiency. In celiac disease, a condition of unknown specific causes but associated with gluten sensitivity, tiny hairs that line the small intestine become decreased making it difficult to absorb nutrients from food. In addition, the part of the intestine that producesintrinsic factor also malfunctions and B12 doesn’t get absorbed properly. Many people with celiac disease, or GERD, frequently use acid blocker medications like Prilosec, Zantac, et al. These also prevent your body from absorbing B12 as they block the acid your body needs to release B12 from food to absorb it. Symptoms of B12 deficiency: B12 deficiencies often go overlooked as they can cause symptoms that can be mistaken for other conditions. Here are some common signs of a B12 deficiency: Chronic irri Continue reading >>

Tinnitus Causes

Tinnitus Causes

Tinnitus, also called ringing in the ears, is a perception of persistent sound in one or both ears when there is no sound present in the environment. Tinnitus is different for each person, ranging from a quiet background hum to a roar that can interfere with daily activity and make it challenging to hear a conversation. Common descriptions of tinnitus symptoms include cicadas, wind, crickets, fluorescent lights, running engines, grinding steel or dripping tap water. Although treatment is still a puzzle, researchers have identified several possible causes to explain the ringing, buzzing, humming or roaring sound. Common causes of tinnitus There are habits and common health issues, such as hearing loss, that can contribute to tinnitus. Presbycusis Hearing loss due to aging is called presbycusis, and it often starts around the age of 60. This gradual loss of hearing as the inner ear deteriorates can cause tinnitus as well. Loud noise exposure Being exposed to loud noise on a regular basis from heavy equipment, chain saws or firearms are common causes of hearing loss and tinnitus. Noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus can also be caused by listening to loud music through headphones or attending loud concerts frequently. It is possible to experience short-term tinnitus after seeing a concert, but long-term exposure will cause permanent damage. Unhealthy habits Researchers are not entirely certain why, but drinking alcohol, smoking cigarettes, eating certain foods and consuming caffeinated beverages can play a role in tinnitus. Frequently being fatigued or stressed can also be a factor. In short, if you're not taking good care of your overall health, you are susceptible to tinnitus. Common ailments Anemia, allergies, impacted earwax, diabetes and an underactive thyroid glan Continue reading >>

Ringing In The Ears!!

Ringing In The Ears!!

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. For the last few weeks I have had constant, loud ringing in my ears. Is this related to Diabetes and what do you do about it? I've had tinnitus for a number of years. I went to a specialty clinic for it, they said its like a roof dripping, it could be from anything and hard to find. You can check with your doc, maybe its a med issue? The sensation of "ringing in the ears" or hearing noise, buzzing, whistling, etc. is a condition called Tinnitus. I have it. I think I was in denial about it at first, but I kept on hearing it in the quietest of times and places. I first noticed it late last summer. I went to my doctor, who sent me to an Ear/Nose/Throat specialist. The E/N/T checked to see if I had wax build up or water behind the eardrum (no in both cases). Then I had to make an appt. with an Audiologist. It was determined that although I hear fine there was some hearing loss in a certain frequency or pitch. That is the cause in my case. To the best of my knowledge, Diabetes has nothing to do with it. Age, and hearing loss are more relevant. I am a 55 year old male. To me, it sounds like being in a country meadow at twilight in summer ... the noise is like "crickets," "cicadas," or "tree frogs." A colleague at work, a woman of my age, says to her it sounds like the electronic noises you hear under the high tension power lines out in the country. Sadly, very little can be done about it. There is no cure. You can be outfitted with a hearing aid that tries to cover it with "white noise." It causes some people to get severely depressed and even suicidal. I appear to have mild tinnitus - but what Continue reading >>

How To Keep Diabetes From Affecting Your Hearing

How To Keep Diabetes From Affecting Your Hearing

How to Keep Diabetes From Affecting Your Hearing Hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes as those without the disease. If you are living with diabetes, reduce your risk of diabetes-related hearing loss with these tips. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . About 16 percent of U.S. adults complain of hearing loss, and that number is on the rise, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Among people with diabetes, the NIH reports that hearing-loss rates double. As with many conditions associated with diabetes , tight blood sugar control and a solid diabetic management strategy can help you avoid hearing loss. Steering clear of other hearing loss risk factors, such as smoking and working in loud occupations, can help protect your ears as well. “Everything you do to reduce [diabetic] complications will reduce the risk of hearing loss,” says certified diabetes educator and diabetes care researcher Ann Williams, PhD, RN, CDE, a research associate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Williams points out that diabetes educators and medical management teams have traditionally been more focused on the long-term impact of diabetes on vision, but current data underscores the importance of protecting hearing as well. “You do not want both hearing and vision impaired,” she notes. A study published in the journal of Otology and Neurotology explored the way that diabetes could affect hearing, and found that diabetes is related to hearing loss at all sound registers, suggesting that it can cause profound damage to the inner ear. Your ear is a delicate structure Continue reading >>

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