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Diabetes Tingling

High Blood Sugar Is Toxic To Your Nerves — Here’s How To Avoid It

High Blood Sugar Is Toxic To Your Nerves — Here’s How To Avoid It

If you have diabetes, you know it well: Too much sugar isn’t good for you. People whose blood sugar is too high or difficult to control are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, eye problems and other complications, including nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy). “High blood sugar is toxic to your nerves,” says pain management specialist Robert Bolash, MD. “When a nerve is damaged, you may feel tingling, pins and needles, burning or sharp, stabbing pain.” Diabetic neuropathy typically starts in your toes, feet or ankles and creeps up your body as the condition worsens, he says. However, nerve damage also can affect your hands and wrists as well as your heart, digestive system, sex organs and more. How to avoid diabetic neuropathy Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some kind of nerve damage, reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). “Anyone with diabetes can get nerve damage at any time,” says Dr. Bolash. “There is an association with very high levels of blood sugar and the development of diabetic neuropathy, but the two do not always go hand in hand.” Unfortunately, even patients with very mild cases of diabetes may be affected with severe cases of nerve pain, he says. According to the NIDDK, the highest rates of nerve damage are among people who have had diabetes 25 years or longer. To avoid diabetic neuropathy, Dr. Bolash advises: Control your blood sugar — and keep it as close to nondiabetic levels as possible. Bad news, good news The bad news about diabetic neuropathy is that it’s tough to reverse. It also can cause serious problems, especially in your feet. If you don’t feel blisters, sores or other foot injuries and don’t promptly care for them, you can develop ragi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diabetic Neuropathy- Help, My Feet Are Numb And Tingling!

Diabetes And Diabetic Neuropathy- Help, My Feet Are Numb And Tingling!

Diabetes and your Nerves: Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy does not emerge overnight. Instead, it usually develops slowly and worsens over time. Some patients have this condition long before they are diagnosed with diabetes. Having diabetes for several years may increase the likelihood of having diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your feet, taking away your ability to feel pain and discomfort, so you may not detect an injury or irritation, eventually causing slow or non-healing foot ulcers that can become infected. This serious complication of diabetes can lead to loss of a foot, a leg or even a life. . Three different groups of nerves can be affected by diabetic neuropathy: Sensory nerves, which enable people to feel pain, temperature and other sensations Motor nerves, which control the muscles and give them their strength and tone Autonomic nerves, which allow the body to perform certain involuntary functions, such as sweating Causes The nerve damage that characterizes diabetic peripheral neuropathy is more common in patients with poorly managed diabetes. However, even patients living with diabetes who have excellent blood sugar (glucose) control can develop diabetic neuropathy. There are several theories as to why this occurs, including the possibilities that high blood glucose or constricted blood vessels produce damage to the nerves. Symptoms Depending on the type(s) of nerves involved, one or more symptoms may be present in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. For sensory neuropathy: Numbness or tingling in the feet Pain or discomfort in the feet or legs, including prickly, sharp pain or burning feet For motor neuropathy: Muscle weakness and loss of muscle tone i Continue reading >>

Other Neuropathy Causes Besides Diabetes

Other Neuropathy Causes Besides Diabetes

There are many situations where a problem on the surface could be caused by a number of factors going on underneath. An unsafe bridge could be due to poor construction, age, or amount of traffic over time. Cavities in your teeth could be caused by what you eat, failing to floss, and poor brushing habits. Neuropathy is a serious foot condition in which nerves become damaged. It is widely known to be associated with diabetes but there are actually several neuropathy causes. Neuropathy is a complication that can develop within several different medical conditions. The dominant symptom is nerve damage, which affects your ability to feel heat, cold, and pain. This loss of sensation puts a person at high risk for injury, making it imperative that you control the problem and do everything possible to prevent future damage. At the root of this is finding out what is damaging the nerves in the first place. Peripheral neuropathy can affect autonomic nerves, motor nerves, and sensory nerves. Patients often complain of tingling sensations, burning, and numbness. While diabetes is the leading cause of this condition, which often manifests in the lower extremity, there are several other factors, which include: chronic liver disease, chronic kidney disease, HIV infection, Vitamin B deficiency, cancer, Lyme disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and excessive alcohol use. If you are feeling any of the symptoms mentioned above, we strongly encourage you to seek medical treatment and find out what is happening. After the root cause is identified, the proper treatment can begin to reduce your risk of any future nerve damage. Don’t ignore symptoms. If they are due to a life-threatening disease, they are the clues to show that you need to take action. Contact Dr. Kevin Powers in Bloomingto Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Hypoglycemia And Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetes, Hypoglycemia And Peripheral Neuropathy

NUMBNESS, TINGLING SENSATIONS, NEUROPATHY AND NEURITIS by Dr. Lawrence Wilson © July 2012, L.D. Wilson Consultants, Inc. All information in this article is for educational purposes only. It is not for the diagnosis, treatment, prescription or cure of any disease or health condition. I would estimate that over one quarter of our clients complain of one or more of these common symptoms. I find that a common cause for numbness and tingling, in particular, is often a blood sugar disturbance. This can occur even when serum and urine blood sugar levels are within normal limits. This is explained below in more detail. However, other causes may be present as well. Nutritional balancing science is helpful for most of these cases, although one must also make sure that mechanical causes are addressed as well. I find that hypoglycemia and diabetes are closely related, extremely common, and often go unrecognized and undiagnosed. As an experiment, Dr. Robert Atkins, MD, tested everyone who walked through his office door for any reason with a 5-hour glucose tolerance test. Over 75% had an abnormal test. This was in the 1970s, I believe. Today the situation is probably far worse. I would estimate that over 90% of the American population has a disturbed glucose metabolism, thanks to too much stress, eating sugars, vitamin and mineral deficiencies and the presence of excessive toxic metals. While the exact mechanisms are not clear, diabetes, in particular, is associated with peripheral neuropathy. This simply means tingling, numbness or other unusual sensations in the nerves of the extremities – the arms and the legs. I believe this is the most important cause for these common symptoms. Diabetes difficult to detect in its early stages. Most of the time, the person has not been diagnos Continue reading >>

Neuropathy Symptoms: Beware Of Tingling Feet

Neuropathy Symptoms: Beware Of Tingling Feet

Don't face Diabetes alone. At Diabetic connect, the world's largest diabetes community, members can Join now at no cost or obligation! Amy Tenderich was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in May of 2003. She is the founder and editor-in-chief of Diabetes Mine and co-authored the book Know Your Numbers, Outlive Your Diabetes. You will frequently find her speaking at diabetes, health, and social media events across the country. Diabetes can cause problems, literally head to toe. And the damage that can occur to your feet is no joke. While most of us have a vague idea that diabetic feet need special care, we usually don’t look into the details until it’s absolutely necessary—in other words, when things are already going wrong. That’s why I encourage you—whether you’ve experienced trouble with your feet to date or not—to take a moment to learn about foot health with diabetes. A lot of people often say things like, “I have this funny tingling in my feet…I wonder if that could have anything to do with my diabetes.” The answer is YES! If you have already experienced noticeable pain or discomfort in your feet, it’s imperative that you see an endocrinologist or podiatrist right away. Intervention can likely slow or halt any damage that may have already been done. If your insurance permits it, you might go straight to the foot specialist (podiatrist), rather than wasting time getting screened first by a general practitioner (also called a “primary care” or “family doctor”). To locate a podiatrist near you, try using Local Podiatry or In Your Area by plugging in your zip code. If you do have neuropathy Treatments depend a lot on your symptoms and the type of neuropathy you have, but the first order of business will be to work on lowering your A1c (the tes Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

If you have diabetes and shooting, burning, pins and needles pain in your feet or hands, you could have painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy—also known as diabetic nerve pain. It is a common complication of diabetes. The most common cause is poorly controlled blood sugar over time. Diabetic nerve pain can take years to develop. In the early stages, you may have no signs at all, and then only start to feel a tingling or numbness in your feet. As it progresses, you may also feel the pain in your hands and it is often worse at night. This means that your nerves may be damaged for a long time before you experience painful symptoms. Nerve damage can’t be reversed, but controlling your blood sugar can help prevent further damage. Talk to your doctor if you experience any symptoms of diabetic nerve pain. Symptoms of diabetic nerve pain These are some of the most common symptoms of diabetic nerve pain: Shooting Burning Pins and needles Numbness Electric shock-like Throbbing Tingling Stinging Stabbing Radiating Sensitivity to touch How is diabetic nerve pain different from other pain? There are two types of pain—muscle pain or nerve pain. Both types of pain are your body’s way of telling you that something is wrong but each has its own cause, symptoms, and management. Muscle pain is a "protective" form of pain. It is caused by something specific like an injury or inflammation. The nerves in the injured muscle or joint send electric signals to the brain as a warning that damage has occurred and the activity you’re doing is causing harm. If you limit or stop the harmful activity, muscle pain can get better over time. Nerve pain is a "non-protective" form of pain. It occurs when your nerves are damaged by an injury or disease, such as diabetes. Your nerves send extra el Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

High blood sugar (glucose) that circulates in the bloodstream instead of being absorbed into cells damages nerves and blood vessels throughout the body and, ultimately, the major organs such as the kidneys and heart. It has been said that there isn’t a system in the body that isn’t affected by diabetes. The good news is that diabetes can be managed and the risk of developing complications significantly reduced. A nationwide study conducted from 1983-1993 called the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial showed that when blood sugar levels are checked consistently throughout the day – and kept close to normal – complications of the disease can be reduced by as much as 70 percent. This method is also referred to as "tight control" of blood sugar and has become standard of care in diabetes management. Diabetic Neuropathy (Nerve Damage) Approximately 60-70 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nerve damage. Often the first symptoms of diabetes are tingling, numbness or pain in some part of the body, which is an indication that nerves have been damaged. Neuropathy from diabetes can affect many different parts of the body, including the lower limbs (legs, feet), the bladder and the gastrointestinal tract. Several theories exist as to why diabetes has such a devastating effect on the nervous system. One theory holds that excess sugar in the bloodstream reacts negatively with an enzyme in the cells surrounding the nerves and damages them. Another theory suggests that decreased blood flow to nerves, from damaged blood vessels caused by diabetes, results in neuropathy. In general, there are three types of neuropathy: sensory, autonomic and motor. Sensory neuropathy is the most common, affecting how we perceive temperature, texture and pain. Autono Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Type 2 diabetes is a sneaky devil. Early on, the warning signs can be hard to spot and people sometimes chalk them up to stress or fatigue, and shrug them off. But screening tests and understanding your risk can help people spot diabetes sooner and get the treatment they need, say experts. "The main thing about early diabetes is that you can have abnormal blood sugar for quite some time and be fairly asymptomatic," Dr. Susan Spratt, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, told CBS News. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes - that's nearly 1 out of 10 U.S. adults - and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of them are undiagnosed. Millions of others are considered at high risk for developing diabetes. Spratt said some people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes may experience dry mouth, excessive thirst, and they may urinate more frequently. Blurry vision can occur, too. Cuts and bruises may be slow to heal and you may feel tingling, pain, or numbness in your hands and feet, according to the American Diabetes Association. Feeling hungry, even after eating, and experiencing extreme fatigue are symptoms, as well. What's happening in the body when type 2 diabetes is lurking? The condition develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. It's not clear why this happens, but genetics and factors such as weight and a sedentary lifestyle can play into the equation, Mayo Clinic experts say. The body needs insulin to survive - it's secreted into the bloodstream via the pancreas. When insulin circulates, it enables sugar to enter cells and lowers the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. With type 2 diabetes, instead of insulin Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

DEAR DOCTOR K: I have peripheral neuropathy. I know that people with diabetes often get neuropathy, but I'm not diabetic. What else can cause this condition? And what can I do about it? DEAR READER: Neuropathy is a medical term that means nerve damage. The type of nerve damage that people with diabetes get involves specific nerve fibers in all nerves, particularly the nerves that travel to the legs and feet. (There are other conditions in which a single nerve leading to the legs and feet is pinched, causing pain. An example is what is often called a "slipped disk" or "herniated disk" in the lower part of the spine). The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include numbness and tingling. Some cases cause burning, shooting or stabbing pain. When the doctor does a physical examination and touches your feet and lower legs with something as light as a feather (like some cotton), you may not feel it. However, you will feel it if the cotton touches your skin in the thigh or elsewhere in the body. You may also lose sensation to a pinprick in the lower legs and feet, but not the rest of you. Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy. But neuropathy can result from other causes as well. These include: -- Excessive alcohol intake. -- Hypothyroidism. In this condition, the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. -- Amyloidosis, a disease in which an abnormal protein accumulates in the body. -- Vitamin deficiencies, particularly vitamin B1, B12 and folate deficiency. -- Critical illness, particularly if you develop a severe inflammatory response to infection. -- Guillain-Barre syndrome. This uncommon autoimmune disorder damages the peripheral nerves. Diagnosing peripheral neuropathy is best done by electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Tingling Could Be Early Sign Of Diabetes

Tingling Could Be Early Sign Of Diabetes

“The findings of this study suggest that patients with newly diagnosed neuropathy should be screened for diabetes, and in addition, the study emphasizes the importance of early glucose control to prevent diabetic neuropathy.” Patients who present with idiopathic neuropathy may in fact be experiencing the first signs of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT or "prediabetes"). In a recent study that compared the association between peripheral neuropathy and prediabetes, findings suggested that electrophysiologic features were similar between patients with diagnosed diabetic neuropathy (DN) and those with prediabetes. In the research, 67 patients enrolled in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Impaired Glucose Tolerance Neuropathy (IGTN) Study underwent nerve conductions studies as well as a series of other electrodiagnostic neuropathy testing. These patients were compared to 52 patients with diabetic neuropathy and 42 with diabetes but no neuropathy who are participating in another NIH funded study. The findings showed that the electrophysiologic characteristics were similar between the IGTN and DN patients. All of the prediabetic patients presented initially with numbness, pain, tingling or a burning sensation in the feet and, at times, also in the fingers. According to researcher, Dr. A. Gordon Smith of the University of Utah, "The neuropathy in patients with IGTN looks the similar to the neuropathy of those patients with diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Awareness of the symptoms and electrophysiologic similarities can lead to early diagnosis and treatment for prediabetes, which we hope will result in improved neuropathy symptoms." National Institutes of Health ================================ Advertisement The world’s smallest meter. The world’s smallest sampl Continue reading >>

Painful Peripheral Neuropathy:

Painful Peripheral Neuropathy:

Neuropathy, Neuropathic Pain, and Reviewed by Nick Christelis, MBBCH, FRCA, FFPMRCA, FANZCA, FFPMANZCA Co-chair, International Neuromodulation Society Public Education, Outreach, and Website Committee, 2016 - Director and Co-Founder Victoria Pain Specialists, Richmond, Australia Introduction This article is intended for patients, caregivers, and the general public, as well as doctors and medical specialists. It has three sections. The first defines neuropathy. The second gives a broad overview of neuropathic pain. The final section concerns painful peripheral neuropathy, a common neurological complaint, its causes, diagnosis and treatment. I. What Is Neuropathy? Neuropathy is a condition that results from damage to, or dysfunction of, the nervous system. Most often, the damage exists in the peripheral nervous system, which lies beyond the spine and brain, although brain injury, such as stroke, can also result in neuropathic symptoms. The symptoms of neuropathy depend on the underlying nerves whose function has been affected. Neuropathy that damages sensory nerves can cause numbness, weakness and stabbing or burning pain – symptoms that may worsen if not treated early. If there has also been damage to the type of nerves that convey the sense of touch, vibration, and temperature, patients may experience tingling, numbness, or the sense of wearing an invisible glove or sock over their hands or feet. If there is damage to motor nerves that control stability and movement, patients may have a lack or coordination, weakness, or cramping. Finally, if the autonomic nerves that regulate internal organ function have also been damaged, patients may experience a reduction in saliva, tears, perspiration, or other organ or gland dysfunction. The Impact of Neuropathy Neuropathy is a Continue reading >>

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS Have you ever felt like your mouth was on fire? This painful sensation can make you feel as if you've scalded your mouth, and can spread to your tongue, gums, lips and inside of your cheeks. According to the Mayo Clinic, this condition is called burning mouth syndrome — it has no visible signs, and it can last from months to years. We do now know that burning mouth syndrome and diabetes can be related, so it's easier to diagnose and treat in diabetics. And it doesn't have to be a life sentence. Here are the common causes of burning mouth syndrome and how to treat them. Possible Causes There are many causes of burning mouth syndrome, and some people, such as diabetics and postmenopausal women, are more likely to suffer from it. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the most common causes include the following: Damage to nerves controlling oral senses such as taste Hormonal changes Nutritional deficiencies Fungal infections in the mouth Acid reflux Dentures that don't fit properly Anxiety and depression With so many possible causes, it's often difficult to clinically point out the culprit in many cases. People with uncontrolled or marginally controlled diabetes can usually narrow down the most probable causes to dry mouth, oral thrush and sometimes neurological abnormalities. Neuropathy (when nerve damage or weakness occurs to the hands and feet) may lead to oral tingling, burning or pain caused by changes in the nerves within the oral region as well. Symptoms and Treatments Moderate to severe burning in the mouth is one of the main symptoms of this disorder. For many people, the burning sensation begins in late morning, builds to a peak by evening, and often subsides at night. Some feel the pain co Continue reading >>

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

Paresthesia. This is the medical term for the annoying and sometimes painful tingling, numbness, and “pins and needles” sensations that can sometimes come from diabetes. A good example of a temporary paresthesia is a foot “falling asleep” from sitting on it or the dead feeling in a hand after you slept with it tucked under your head. Compression of a nerve in your wrist can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, making your hands ache and fingertips numb. Sometimes disc problems in the spine lead to numbness and pain. Those are also instances of parasthesia, but they are not caused by diabetes. The cause of our tingling and numbness from diabetes is usually peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the arms, legs, hands, and feet. This complication results from high blood glucose levels damaging nerves and blood vessels. Since the damage hits our smallest blood vessels first, the nerves these vessels feed may develop paresthesia quickly. So tingling and numbness in our toes and fingers are often some of the earliest complications of Type 2 diabetes. But there are many other possible causes of paresthesia. A few of them are hypothyroidism (low thyroid), vitamin B12 deficiency, arthritis, poisoning, stroke, cancer, and conditions such as Lyme disease and HIV. People with diabetes often have problems with hypothyroidism and B12 deficiency. If you are plagued by paresthesia, it is a good idea to get blood tests for these conditions. “If I woke up without pain, I’d think I was dead” This phrase made me laugh, but only because it is so true. Pain is frequently part of life as we age. But I have found that paresthesia caused by diabetes can improve. Getting your blood sugar to the target recommended by your health-care provider will help over time. But in the meantime, Continue reading >>

10 Common Symptoms Of Type Ii Diabetes

10 Common Symptoms Of Type Ii Diabetes

Over 25 million people in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, however, the majority of individuals with diabetes are not aware they have the condition due to the fact that the symptoms, on their own, seem more like annoyances then signs of a dangerous condition. Your best hope is early diagnoses if you want to avoid serious diabetes complications—such as kidney disease, vision problems, and thyroid issues. Here are the ten most common early warning signs of type 2 diabetes… 1. Numbness Numbness that starts as a tingling in the hands, fingers, legs, and feet is often an early warning sign of diabetes. This occurs due to an increase in blood sugar levels, causing blood vessel restriction to the extremities, and eventually damage to nerve fibers. For many, this numbness is often the first sign of any health issues. Diabetes numbness presents in a prickly, tingling, or pain in the hands and feet that starts out minor at first, but as the nerve damage progresses over times, and sometimes years, mild tingling can become chronic and quite painful, involving motor function, sensory, autonomic and involuntary nervous system response with a sudden and painful and numbness in the fingers, toes, feet, hands, legs, and arms, sometimes accompanied by muscle wasting of the hands and feet. 2. Increased Urination Typically, diabetes sufferers claim they had an overwhelming urge to urinate, and when they do urinate the amount is quite significant. This increased urination is what often spurs a doctor’s visit and a type II diabetes diagnoses. This increased urination will often result in severe dehydration. So it’s vital to keep your fluid levels high. If the body becomes dehydrated, immune function decreases, leaving you susceptible to all sorts of illnesses and even damaged kidney fu Continue reading >>

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