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Diabetes Thirst Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The condition can cause long-term complications - and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney damage. However it can alter the way the body works in the short-term. People with diabetes have an increase risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels can lead to decreased hydration in the body. Symptoms of dehydration can include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, tiredness and dark coloured urine. Often, feeling thirsty is the last symptom of dehydration and irritability and tiredess can come first. People are also considered to be dehydrated if they urinate less than four times a day. Symptoms of severe dehydration can include low blood pressure, a weak pulse or rapid heart rate and feeling confused. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. If you feel thirsty all the time it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, the kidneys will work to get rid some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. While the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing and this is why we tend to have increase thirst when blood sugar levels are too high. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is a condition in which your ability to control the balance of water within your body is not working properly. Your kidneys are not able to retain water and this causes you to pass large amounts of urine. Because of this, you become more thirsty and want to drink more. There are two different types of diabetes insipidus: cranial and nephrogenic. Cranial diabetes insipidus may only be a short-term problem in some cases. Treatment includes drinking plenty of fluids so that you do not become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Treatment with medicines may also be needed for both types of diabetes insipidus. A note about thirst and water balance in your body Getting the balance right between how much water your body takes in and how much water your body passes out is very important. This is because a large proportion (about 70%) of your body is actually water. Also, water levels in your body help to control the levels of some important salts, particularly sodium and potassium. Your body normally controls (regulates) water balance in two main ways: By making you feel thirsty and so encouraging you to drink and take more water in. Through the action of a chemical (hormone) called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) which controls the amount of water passed out in your urine. ADH is also known as vasopressin. It is made in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. It is then transported to another part of your brain, the pituitary gland, from where it is released into your bloodstream. After its release, ADH has an effect on your kidneys. It causes your kidneys to pass out less water in your urine (your urine becomes more concentrated). So, if your body is lacking in fluid (dehydrated), your thirst sensation will be triggered, encouraging you to drink. As Continue reading >>

Polydipsia

Polydipsia

Tweet Polydipsia is the term given to excessive thirst and is one of the initial symptoms of diabetes. It is also usually accompanied by temporary or prolonged dryness of the mouth. We all get thirsty at various times during the day. Adequate daily intake of water (several glasses) is very important as water is essential for many bodily functions, including regulating body temperature and removing waste. However, if you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body. Causes of polydipsia Increased thirst is often the reaction to fluid loss during exercise, or to eating salty or spicy foods. It can also be caused by: Diarrhoea Vomiting Profuse sweating Significant blood loss or Certain prescription medications Increased thirst can also occur as a result of high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes or yet to be diagnosed diabetes. Persistent excessive thirst can be the result of one of the following: Diabetes mellitus Diabetes insipidus - a condition unrelated to diabetes mellitus that affects the kidneys and the hormones that interact with them, resulting in large quantities of urine being produced Loss of body fluids from the bloodstream into the tissues due to: burns or severe infections (sepsis) or heart, liver, or kidney failure Psychogenic polydipsia - compulsive water drinking associated with mental/psychiatric disorders Excessive thirst can be caused by high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), and is also one of the ‘Big 3’ signs of diabetes mellitus. Increased thirst and diabetes Increased thirst in people with diabetes can sometimes be, but certainly not always, an indication of higher than normal blood glucose levels. People with diabetes with access t Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes

Feline Diabetes

Insulin injections are the preferred method of managing diabetes in cats. Figure 1: To administer an injection, pull the loose skin between the shoulder blades with one hand. With the other hand, insert the needle directly into the indentation made by holding up the skin, draw back on the plunger slightly, and if no blood appears in the syringe, inject gently. Tips for Treatment 1. You can do it! Treating your cat may sound difficult, but for most owners it soon becomes routine. 2. Work very closely with your veterinarian to get the best results for your cat. 3. Once your cat has been diagnosed, it's best to start insulin therapy as soon as possible. 4. Home glucose monitoring can be very helpful. 5. Tracking your cat's water intake, activity level, appetite, and weight can be beneficial. 6. A low carbohydrate diet helps diabetic cats maintain proper glucose levels. 7. With careful treatment, your cat's diabetes may well go into remission. 8. If your cat shows signs of hypoglycemia (lethargy, weakness, tremors, seizures, vomiting) apply honey, a glucose solution, or dextrose gel to the gums and immediately contact a veterinarian. Possible Complications Insulin therapy lowers blood glucose, possibly to dangerously low levels. Signs of hypoglycemia include weakness, lethargy, vomiting, lack of coordination, seizures, and coma. Hypoglycemia can be fatal if left untreated, so any diabetic cat that shows any of these signs should be offered its regular food immediately. If the cat does not eat voluntarily, it should be given oral glucose in the form of honey, corn syrup, or proprietary dextrose gels (available at most pharmacies) and brought to a veterinarian immediately. It is important, however, that owners not attempt to force fingers, food, or fluids into the mouth of a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

7 0 We’ve written before about the signs and symptoms of diabetes. While there are a lot of sources about what symptoms diabetes causes, and even some good information about why they’re bad for you, what you don’t often get are the “whys”. And while the “whys” aren’t necessarily critical for your long-term health, they can help you to understand what’s going on with your body and why it acts the way it does. That, in turn, can help with acceptance and understanding of how to better treat the symptoms, which in turn can help you stay on a good diabetes management regimen. In short, you don’t NEED to know why diabetes causes excessive thirst, but knowing the mechanism behind it can make your blood glucose control regimen make more sense and help you stick to it. So why DOES diabetes cause thirst? First, we’d like to start by saying that excessive thirst is not a good indicator of diabetes. For many people, the symptom creeps up so slowly that it’s almost impossible to determine if your thirst has noticeably increased (unless you keep a spreadsheet of how much water you drink, in which case you also probably get tested pretty regularly anyway). It’s also a common enough symptom that a sudden increase in thirst can mean almost anything. Some conditions that cause thirst increases include allergies, the flu, the common cold, almost anything that causes a fever, and dehydration caused by vomiting or diarrhea. So while excessive thirst is one of those diabetes symptoms that happens, and needs to be addressed, it’s not always a great sign that you should immediately go out and get an A1C test. Why does diabetes cause thirst? Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes symptoms may occur when blood sugar levels in the body become abnormally elevated. The most common symptoms of diabetes include: increased thirst increased hunger excessive fatigue increased urination, especially at night blurry vision Symptoms can vary from one person to the next. They also depend on which type of diabetes you have. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to begin abruptly and dramatically. Type 1 diabetes is most often seen in children, adolescents, and young adults. However, type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. In addition to the symptoms listed above, people with type 1 diabetes may notice a quick and sudden weight loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. Although it primarily develops in adults, it’s beginning to be seen more frequently in younger people. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being overweight, being sedentary, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes don’t experience any symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms are slow to develop. Oftentimes, your symptoms may seem harmless. The most common symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst and fatigue, are often vague. When experienced on their own, symptoms such as these may not be anything to worry about. If you’re experiencing one or more of these symptoms, you should speak with your doctor about being screened for diabetes. Frequent thirst You’ve had glass after glass of water, but you still feel like you need more. This is because your muscles and other tissues are dehydrated. When your blood sugar levels rise, your body tries to pull fluid from other tissues to dilute the sugar in your bloodstream. This process can cause your body to dehydrate, prompting you to drink more water. Frequent urination Drinking excessive amou Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

On this page: What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that occurs when a person's kidneys pass an abnormally large volume of urine that is insipid—dilute and odorless. In most people, the kidneys pass about 1 to 2 quarts of urine a day. In people with diabetes insipidus, the kidneys can pass 3 to 20 quarts of urine a day. As a result, a person with diabetes insipidus may feel the need to drink large amounts of liquids. Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the kidneys normally filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through tubes called ureters. The bladder stores urine. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. How is fluid regulated in the body? A person's body regulates fluid by balancing liquid intake and removing extra fluid. Thirst usually controls a person’s rate of liquid intake, while urination removes most fluid, although people also lose fluid through sweating, breathing, or diarrhea. The hormone vasopressin, also called antidiuretic hormone, con Continue reading >>

Excessive Thirst And Diabetes

Excessive Thirst And Diabetes

I know that extreme thirst is a symptom of diabetes, but can the thirst sometimes be occasional, or is it a constant everyday thing? Excessive thirst can be a symptom of diabetes mellitus, and is usually accompanied by passing excessive amounts of urine. Often there is also weight loss and the person feels unwell. The thirst is continuous, so people often wake at night to drink water. It is treated with insulin or tablets. Another cause of thirst is diabetes insipidus. This is when there is a shortage of the hormone that regulates water excretion by the kidneys. Large quantities of water are drunk to compensate for the large amount of dilute urine that is passed. It is treated with hormone replacement, which controls the symptoms. Thirst is also a natural feeling that we all get when the fluid level in our body is reduced. This may happen on a hot day when we lose a lot of fluid in sweat, or after a lot of exercise. This type of thirst is variable and the cause is usually obvious. Some people suffer from compulsive drinking, which is not the same as true thirst. They feel the need to drink lots of fluid, and because they drink so much they pass more urine. However tests in these people are normal, and restriction of fluids does not cause any harm, although it may make them feel uncomfortable. This type of ‘thirst’ can be quite variable and more of a problem at some times than others, probably due to psychological factors Yours sincerely The NetDoctor Medical Team Other Qs & As Last updated 03.04.2011 Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Why Am I Always Thirsty?

Why Am I Always Thirsty?

Thirst is your body’s way of telling you that it’s running low on water, which it needs to work well. It’s normal to feel thirsty when it’s hot or after you’ve powered through an intense workout. But if you’re constantly refilling your cup without relief, it could signal another health problem. Dehydration means your body doesn’t have enough water to carry out normal tasks, and thirst is the main symptom. It can happen for a lot of reasons, such as exercise, diarrhea, vomiting, and too much sweating. Besides wanting water, other signs can include: Dark-colored urine Not needing to pee as often Feeling tired or lightheaded Kids who are dehydrated might also: Have few or no tears when they cry Have a dry, sticky mouth Go to the bathroom less or have fewer wet diapers Be irritable or sluggish Thirst you can’t seem to quench, what doctors call polydipsia, is one symptom of diabetes. When you have this disease, your body doesn’t make enough of the hormone insulin or doesn’t use it properly. It causes too much sugar (called glucose) to build up in your body. Glucose in your urine draws in more water, so you pee more often. That leaves your body wanting to replace the fluid you’re losing. Along with thirst and more visits to the restroom, other symptoms of diabetes include: Despite its name, this condition isn’t related to diabetes. It happens when your body doesn’t make enough of a hormone that helps your kidneys control the amount of water in your body. Excessive thirst is one of the major symptoms. If you have diabetes insipidus, you may also have: When your mouth feels very dry, it can make you thirsty. Usually, it happens because the glands in your mouth make less saliva. You may get it because of medications you take, treatments for other condit Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Make You So Thirsty?

Why Does Diabetes Make You So Thirsty?

Excessive thirst, or polydipsia, can be triggered by different factors such as eating too much salt or taking medications that cause dry mouth. Thirst is also a symptom of diabetes. For people with diabetes, thirst can be a sign of hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar. The kidneys play a vital role in regulating levels of blood sugar by filtering the blood and absorbing excess glucose. When very high levels of sugar build up in the blood, the kidneys can’t keep up and they produce more urine than normal — a condition known as polyuria. As a result, you can become dehydrated. “People who have well-controlled diabetes should be at no increased risk for excessive thirst compared with somebody who doesn’t have diabetes,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “It’s really poor control of one’s blood sugar and an increase in urination and excretion of water that makes people [with diabetes] feel very thirsty and increases their need to maintain water balance.” As Dr. Bloomgarden points out, even people who are doing a good job of controlling their diabetes can develop very high blood sugar. A cold, infection, or even a very stressful situation can cause blood sugar to rise, and excessive thirst may be the first sign that something is wrong. “If you’re experiencing excessive thirst, you should contact your doctor immediately, because it may indicate severe hyperglycemia,” says Bloomgarden. If you have diabetes and you’re not sure whether you’re unusually thirsty, Bloomgarden suggests that you check your blood sugar. If your blood sug Continue reading >>

Dehydration And Diabetes

Dehydration And Diabetes

Tweet People with diabetes have an increased risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels lead to decreased hydration in the body. Diabetes insipidus, a form of diabetes that is not linked with high blood sugar levels, also carries a higher risk of dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration The symptoms of dehydration include: Thirst Headache Dry mouth and dry eyes Dizziness Tiredness Dark yellow coloured urine Symptoms of severe dehydration Low blood pressure Sunken eyes A weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat Feeling confused Lethargy Causes and contributory factors of dehydration The following factors can contribute to dehydration. Having more of these factors present at one time can raise the risk of dehydration: Dehydration and blood glucose levels If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, our kidneys will attempt to remove some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. Whilst the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing. This is why we tend to have increased thirst when our blood glucose levels run too high. If we drink water, we can help to rehydrate the blood. The other method the body uses is to draw on other available sources of water from within the body, such as saliva, tears and taking stored water from cells of the body. This is why we may experience a dry mouth and dry eyes when our blood glucose levels are high. If we do not have access to drink water, the body will find it difficult to pass glucose out of the blood via urine and can result in further dehydration as the body seeks to find water from our body's cells. Treating dehydration Dehydration can be treated by taking on board fluids. Water is ideal because it has no add Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

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