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Diabetes Thirst Treatment

Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can affect all people, regardless of age. Early symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be missed, so those affected may not even know they have the condition. An estimated one out of every three people within the early stages of type 2 diabetes are not aware they have it. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates for energy, leading to high levels of blood sugar. These chronically high blood sugar levels increase a person's risk of developing serious health problems. Potential Consequences of High Blood Sugar Nerve problems Vision loss Joint deformities Diabetic coma (life-threatening) Other diabetes complications from high blood pressure are listed further along in this slideshow Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Thirst Although people with type 2 diabetes may not have specific symptoms, an increase in thirst is one symptom that is characteristic of the condition. The increased thirst can accompany other symptoms like frequent urination, feelings of unusual hunger, dry mouth, and weight gain or loss. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Headaches Other symptoms that can occur if high blood sugar levels persist are fatigue, blurred vision, and headaches. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Infections Often, type 2 diabetes is only identified after its negative health consequences are apparent. Certain infections and sores that take a long time to heal are a warning sign. Other possible signs include frequent yeast infections or urinary tract infections and itchy skin. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: Sexual Dysfunction Sexual problems can occur as a result of type 2 diabetes. Since diabetes can damage the blood vessels and nerves in the sex organs, decreased sensation can develop, potentially leading to difficulties with orgasm. Vaginal dryne Continue reading >>

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

The main symptoms of diabetes are increased urination (polyuria), thirst ( polydipsia) and tiredness. Common symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes: Excessive thirst Increased urination (sometimes as often as every hour) Unexpected weight loss Nausea, perhaps vomiting Blurred vision In women, frequent vaginal infections Yeast infections (thrush) Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching skin, especially in the groin or vaginal area. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop quickly, over weeks or sometimes days. Type 2 diabetes often doesn’t cause symptoms and is identified on routine screening. Acanthosis nigricans as a warning sign This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin, especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes light brown or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like a small wart, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually affects people who are very overweight. There is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but losing weight may improve the condition. Acanthosis nigricans usually precedes diabetes. There are other conditions that are also known to cause acanthosis nigricans, including acromegaly and Cushing syndrome. Acanthosis nigricans is a skin manifestation of insulin resistance in most people. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a condition characterised by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that is first recognised during pregnancy. The condition occurs in approximately 14% of all pregnant women. It is usually diagnosed during routine screening before it causes any symptoms. Seek Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Have you ever been dying of thirst and a coworker or friend said, "You know, you may have diabetes?" Sounds like a stretch, but in reality, thirst can be a signal of this disease that is taking America by storm. So why is thirst linked to diabetes? According to a 1995 CNN.com article, with diabetes, excess blood sugar, or glucose, in your body draws water from your tissues, making you feel dehydrated. To quench your thirst, you drink a lot of water and other beverages which leads to more frequent urination. If you notice unexplained increases in your thirst and urination, see your doctor. It may not necessarily mean you have diabetes. It could be something else. If you already have diabetes, then you know that you already have to make some changes to your diet. As mentioned above, drinking water in place of the sugary options is crucial. Water is, according to diabetes-specialists, important for everybody, but especially for diabetes-patients, because even a small decrease of the hydration-level could cause serious health problems for diabetics. One of the best warning signs that glucose levels are high is thirst. And, water is the best way to quench that thirst, and to break down those sugars. Also, in order to keep the body functioning normally, water should be a constant. But, water can be lost through exercise and normal exposure to high temps. With that, being hydrated will help prevent fatigue and help physical performance. A study presented at the annual meeting of American diabetes association included 3,615 men and women with normal blood sugar levels at the beginning of the study. Those who reported they drank more than 36 ounces of water a day (4.5 cups) were 21% less likely to develop hyperglycemia over the next 9 years than those who said they drank 16 ounc Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

7 0 We’ve written before about the signs and symptoms of diabetes. While there are a lot of sources about what symptoms diabetes causes, and even some good information about why they’re bad for you, what you don’t often get are the “whys”. And while the “whys” aren’t necessarily critical for your long-term health, they can help you to understand what’s going on with your body and why it acts the way it does. That, in turn, can help with acceptance and understanding of how to better treat the symptoms, which in turn can help you stay on a good diabetes management regimen. In short, you don’t NEED to know why diabetes causes excessive thirst, but knowing the mechanism behind it can make your blood glucose control regimen make more sense and help you stick to it. So why DOES diabetes cause thirst? First, we’d like to start by saying that excessive thirst is not a good indicator of diabetes. For many people, the symptom creeps up so slowly that it’s almost impossible to determine if your thirst has noticeably increased (unless you keep a spreadsheet of how much water you drink, in which case you also probably get tested pretty regularly anyway). It’s also a common enough symptom that a sudden increase in thirst can mean almost anything. Some conditions that cause thirst increases include allergies, the flu, the common cold, almost anything that causes a fever, and dehydration caused by vomiting or diarrhea. So while excessive thirst is one of those diabetes symptoms that happens, and needs to be addressed, it’s not always a great sign that you should immediately go out and get an A1C test. Why does diabetes cause thirst? Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the Continue reading >>

7 Reasons You're Always Thirsty

7 Reasons You're Always Thirsty

When that parched feeling strikes, the reason why is usually clear: You've been skimping on your H2O intake, bingeing on your fave salty treat, or working out ultra-hard. But your mouth morphing into the Sahara may also be your body's way of hinting that you have a health condition. "Any condition that alters your water or salt balance in the body can trigger thirst," says Laura M. Hahn, MD, a primary care physician at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. If you follow good hydration practices (your pee should be within the light yellow to clear range) yet still feel dehydrated, you may want to check in with your doc to rule out these sneaky saboteurs: 1. Diabetes Diabetes can increase your risk of dehydration—especially if you're not yet aware of it. When blood sugar levels are too high, your body peer-pressures your kidneys into producing more urine to get rid of the excess glucose, says Heather Rosen, MD, medical director of UPMC Urgent Care North Huntingdon in Pennsylvania. "Frequent urination, another common symptom, will bring on thirst," she adds. "This leads to drinking more fluids, which compounds the problem." If you experience excessive thirst and urination, as well as other symptoms like unexplained weight loss, fatigue, or irritability, your doc can carry out a blood glucose test to find out if you have diabetes. 2. Diabetes Insipidus Although diabetes insipidus isn't related to the diabetes we know and loathe, it does share some of the same signs and symptoms, such as dehydration and a busy bladder. Diabetes insipidus is characterized by a hormone imbalance in your body that affects water absorption. Because you end up losing vast amounts of water through your urine and have no say in the matter, thirst strikes as your body tries to compensate for the flui Continue reading >>

Why Am I Always Thirsty?

Why Am I Always Thirsty?

Thirst is your body’s way of telling you that it’s running low on water, which it needs to work well. It’s normal to feel thirsty when it’s hot or after you’ve powered through an intense workout. But if you’re constantly refilling your cup without relief, it could signal another health problem. Dehydration means your body doesn’t have enough water to carry out normal tasks, and thirst is the main symptom. It can happen for a lot of reasons, such as exercise, diarrhea, vomiting, and too much sweating. Besides wanting water, other signs can include: Dark-colored urine Not needing to pee as often Feeling tired or lightheaded Kids who are dehydrated might also: Have few or no tears when they cry Have a dry, sticky mouth Go to the bathroom less or have fewer wet diapers Be irritable or sluggish Thirst you can’t seem to quench, what doctors call polydipsia, is one symptom of diabetes. When you have this disease, your body doesn’t make enough of the hormone insulin or doesn’t use it properly. It causes too much sugar (called glucose) to build up in your body. Glucose in your urine draws in more water, so you pee more often. That leaves your body wanting to replace the fluid you’re losing. Along with thirst and more visits to the restroom, other symptoms of diabetes include: Despite its name, this condition isn’t related to diabetes. It happens when your body doesn’t make enough of a hormone that helps your kidneys control the amount of water in your body. Excessive thirst is one of the major symptoms. If you have diabetes insipidus, you may also have: When your mouth feels very dry, it can make you thirsty. Usually, it happens because the glands in your mouth make less saliva. You may get it because of medications you take, treatments for other condit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Overview Diabetes insipidus is a rare condition where you produce a large amount of urine and often feel thirsty. Diabetes insipidus isn't related to diabetes mellitus (usually just known as diabetes), but it does share some of the same signs and symptoms. The two main symptoms of diabetes insipidus are: passing large amounts of urine, even at night (polyuria) In very severe cases of diabetes insipidus, up to 20 litres of urine can be passed in a day. Read more about the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. When to seek medical advice You should always see your GP if you're feeling thirsty all the time. Although it may not be diabetes insipidus, it should be investigated. Also see your GP if you're: passing more urine than normal – most healthy adults pass urine four to seven times in a 24 hour period passing small amounts of urine at frequent intervals – sometimes, this can occur along with the feeling that you need to pass urine immediately Children tend to urinate more frequently because they have smaller bladders. However, seek medical advice if your child urinates more than 10 times a day. Your GP will be able to carry out a number of tests to help determine what's causing the problem. Read more about diagnosing diabetes insipidus. What causes diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is caused by problems with a hormone called vasopressin (AVP), also called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). AVP plays a key role in regulating the amount of fluid in the body. It's produced by specialist nerve cells in a part of the brain known as the hypothalamus. AVP passes from the hypothalamus to the pituitary gland where it's stored until needed. The pituitary gland releases AVP when the amount of water in the body becomes too low. It helps retain water in the body by reducing the amount Continue reading >>

Ucla Pituitary Tumor Program

Ucla Pituitary Tumor Program

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is an abnormal condition characterized by the inability of the kidneys to conserve water. This leads to excessive thirst and a high volume of urine. The most common cause is the lack of a pituitary hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In less common cases, ADH is present, but the kidneys do not respond to it. Diabetes Insipidus: Expert Care in Southern California The UCLA Pituitary Tumor Program offers comprehensive management of pituitary insufficiency. Our physicians have years of experience in diagnosing, treating and managing pituitary conditions. We use the most sophisticated diagnostic equipment and monitor your progress carefully during treatment and recovery. Learn more about diabetes insipidus: The primary job of ADH is to restrict the amount of water in the urine, making the urine more concentrated. In patients with diabetes insipidus, the urine is very diluted. There are many causes of central (pituitary) diabetes insipidus, including: Congenital absence of the gland Lesions that involve or destroy the pituitary stalk and/or posterior pituitary gland Lymphocytic hypophysitis Sarcoid Germinoma Tuberculosis Other granulomatous diseases Tumors of the posterior pituitary gland Pituitary gangliocytoma Injury to the posterior pituitary gland or pituitary stalk following surgery to that area of the brain Patients with diabetes insipidus typically experience: Excessive thirst, particularly for ice cold water Excessive urination of dilute urine If the brain's thirst mechanism is working normally, a person with diabetes insipidus will drink large volumes of water to maintain a normal serum concentration. However, failure or inability to drink enough water to keep up with the water lost in the urine results in severe dehydration. Symptoms c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is a condition in which your ability to control the balance of water within your body is not working properly. Your kidneys are not able to retain water and this causes you to pass large amounts of urine. Because of this, you become more thirsty and want to drink more. There are two different types of diabetes insipidus: cranial and nephrogenic. Cranial diabetes insipidus may only be a short-term problem in some cases. Treatment includes drinking plenty of fluids so that you do not become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Treatment with medicines may also be needed for both types of diabetes insipidus. A note about thirst and water balance in your body Getting the balance right between how much water your body takes in and how much water your body passes out is very important. This is because a large proportion (about 70%) of your body is actually water. Also, water levels in your body help to control the levels of some important salts, particularly sodium and potassium. Your body normally controls (regulates) water balance in two main ways: By making you feel thirsty and so encouraging you to drink and take more water in. Through the action of a chemical (hormone) called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) which controls the amount of water passed out in your urine. ADH is also known as vasopressin. It is made in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. It is then transported to another part of your brain, the pituitary gland, from where it is released into your bloodstream. After its release, ADH has an effect on your kidneys. It causes your kidneys to pass out less water in your urine (your urine becomes more concentrated). So, if your body is lacking in fluid (dehydrated), your thirst sensation will be triggered, encouraging you to drink. As Continue reading >>

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that can cause blood sugar (glucose) to be higher than normal. Many people do not feel symptoms with type 2 diabetes. However, common symptoms do exist and being able to recognize them is important. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes occur when blood sugar levels are abnormally high. The most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: If you experience any of these symptoms on a regular basis, talk to your doctor. They may recommend that you be tested for diabetes, which is performed with a basic blood draw. Routine diabetes screening normally starts at age 45. However, it might start earlier if you are: sedentary affected by high blood pressure, now or when you were pregnant from a family with a history of type 2 diabetes from an ethnic background that has a higher risk of type 2 diabetes at higher risk due to high blood pressure, low good cholesterol levels, or high triglyceride levels If you have diabetes, it can help to understand how your blood sugar levels affect the way you feel. Most common symptoms of diabetes are caused by elevated glucose levels. Frequent or Increased Urination Elevated glucose levels force fluids from your cells. This increases the amount of fluid delivered to the kidneys. This makes you need to urinate more. It may also eventually make you dehydrated. Thirst As your tissues become dehydrated, you will become thirsty. Increased thirst is another common diabetes symptom. The more you urinate, the more you need to drink, and vice versa. Fatigue Feeling worn down is another common symptom of diabetes. Glucose is normally one of the body’s main sources of energy. When cells cannot absorb sugar, you can become fatigued or feel exhausted. Blurred Vision In the short term, high glucose levels can cause a swelli Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms, Signs, Diet, And Treatment

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which cells cannot use blood sugar (glucose) efficiently for energy. This happens when the cells become insensitive to insulin and the blood sugar gradually gets too high. There are two types of diabetes mellitus, type 1 and type 2. In type 2, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the cells cannot use it very efficiently. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot make insulin due to auto-immune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Type 2 can be caused by: Lack of activity (sedentary behavior) Genetics Risk factors include: Being overweight Being sedentary including watching more than 2 hours of TV per day Drinking soda Consuming too much sugar and processed food The signs and symptoms of this type of this type of diabetes are sometimes subtle. The major symptom is often being overweight. Other symptoms and signs include: Urinating a lot Gaining or losing weight unintentionally Dark skin under armpits, chin, or groin Unusual odor to urine Blurry vision Often there are no specific symptoms of the condition and it goes undiagnosed until routine blood tests are ordered. A blood sugar level more than 125 when fasting or more than 200 randomly is a diagnosis for diabetes. Treatment is with diet and lifestyle changes that include eating less sugary foods, and foods that are high in simple carbohydrates (sugar, bread, and pasta.) Sometimes a person will need to take drugs, for example, metformin (Glucophage). People with both types of diabetes need monitor their blood sugar levels often to avoid high (hyperglycemia) and low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Complications include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, sexual and/or urinary problems, foot problems, and eye problems. This health condition can be prevented by following a Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Urination And Thirst? A Lesson On Osmosis

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Urination And Thirst? A Lesson On Osmosis

A TABA Seminar on Diabetes I have the pleasure of being an executive member of the Toronto Applied Biostatistics Association (TABA), a volunteer-run professional organization here in Toronto that organizes seminars on biostatistics. During this past Tuesday, Dr. Loren Grossman from the LMC Diabetes and Endocrinology Centre generously donated his time to deliver an introductory seminar on diabetes for biostatisticians. The Institute for Clinical and Evaluative Sciences (ICES) at Sunnybrook Hospital kindly hosted us and provided the venue for the seminar. As a chemist and a former pre-medical student who studied physiology, I really enjoyed this intellectual treat, especially since Loren was clear, informative, and very knowledgeable about the subject. Diabetes Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases that are characterized by a high concentration of glucose in the bloodstream. Glucose is a common monomer of carbohydrates that exists in many foods, including bread, pasta, rice, fruits, vegetables, and refined sugar. It provides the fuel for the cells of our bodies to function. Chemical Structures of Open-Chain and Cyclic Glucose For a variety of reasons that distinguish the different types of diabetes, diabetics cannot absorb glucose normally, leaving an excess of glucose in the bloodstream. Diabetes leads to many health problems, like kidney failure, blindness, heart attacks and strokes. The Growing Prevalence of Diabetes It was interesting but sad for me to learn about the increased prevalence of diabetes in North America and around the world. Loren commented that diabetes was a specialized niche area in endocrinology when he began his research in this field over 25 years ago, but it is now a major area of study in medical research because of its epidemic proportions. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

I haven't experienced any symptoms of diabetes in the past, but just in the last week or so, I have seen a dramatic increase in my urination frequency: I have to go about once an hour. And I seem to be constantly thirsty. Is it possible that symptoms of diabetes could materialize virtually overnight? Continue reading >>

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