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Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

Post Market Review Of Products Used In The

Post Market Review Of Products Used In The

MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES Stage 3 – Medicines used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes Australian Diabetes Council Page 2 of 11 Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations .................................................................................... 3 Executive Summary ................................................................................................ 4 Introduction ........................................................................................................... 5 Australian Diabetes Council ................................................................................... 5 Type 2 Diabetes in Australia .................................................................................. 6 Prevalence and incidence ................................................................................... 6 Impact and burden ............................................................................................ 6 The type 2 diabetes journey ............................................................................... 7 Review of medicines used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes ...................................... 9 Post-market stage three; terms of reference one to four ........................................... 9 Terms of reference point one .............................................................................. 9 Terms of reference point two ............................................................................. 10 Terms of reference point three and four .............................................................. 10 Post-market review ............................................................................................. 11 Scope and time frames ........................................................................... Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

Diabetes is a challenging problem for public health worldwide. It is a chronic disorder in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the body does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond adequately to the insulin that is produced. As there is currently no cure for diabetes, the condition requires lifelong management. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Australia

Diabetes Australia

Diabetes Australia is the third oldest diabetes association in the world, after the United Kingdom and Portugal. Originally established in the state of New South Wales (NSW) in 1937, the organisation's head office is now in the nation's capital, Canberra. Currently a federation of ten operational organisations is overseen: five State/Territory Associations of Diabetes Australia, the Australian Diabetes Society, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association, the Kellion Diabetes Foundation and The Diabetes Research Foundation - Western Australia. Diabetes Australia is a not-for-profit organisation supported financially by the community. In addition to its original mandate as an extended support group, Diabetes Australia raises funds to invest in research, health services, provision of self–management products and services, and public awareness programs. It also facilitates the development of national policies about diabetes. Diabetes Australia assists the Australian Government in the administration of the National Diabetes Services Scheme.[1] Statement of purpose[edit] Diabetes Australia works in partnership with diabetes health professionals, educators and researchers to minimise the impact of diabetes on the Australian community. Diabetes Australia is committed to turning diabetes around through awareness, prevention, detection, management and a cure. Diabetes Australia raises awareness about the seriousness of diabetes, promotes prevention and early detection strategies and advocates for better standards of care. Diabetes Australia is also a significant financial contributor to research into better treatments for diabetes and the search for a cure. Publications and research[edit] Diabetes Australia is involved in two publications, one for medical specialists, and an Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

© Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet 2015 This product, excluding the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet logo, artwork, and any material owned by a third party or protected by a trademark, has been released under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 3.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) licence. Excluded material owned by third parties may include, for example, design and layout, images obtained under licence from third parties and signatures. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

by the year 2025. For type 2, this is likely driven by rising obesity, the ageing population, dietary changes, and sedentary if there are no associated complications. However this can rise to as much as $9,645 in people with both micro- and average annual cost per person being $4,669. The average total annual cost is $3,468 for people without complications, Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia – Baker Idi Health And Diabetes Institute, Diabetes Australia, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation – March 2012

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia – Baker Idi Health And Diabetes Institute, Diabetes Australia, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation – March 2012

Diabetes: the silent pandemic and its impact on Australia – Baker IDI Health and Diabetes Institute, Diabetes Australia, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation – March 2012 Continue reading >>

Guide: How To Cite A Government Publication In Apa Style

Guide: How To Cite A Government Publication In Apa Style

Use the following template to cite a government publication using the APA citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator. Key: Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source. Black text = text required by the APA style. Reference list Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment. Template: Author Surname, Author Initial. (Year Published). Title (p. Pages Used). City: Publisher. Example: Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute,. (2012). Diabetes: the silent pandemic and its impact on Australia (pp. 1-25). Diabetes Australia. In-text citation Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment. Template (Author Surname, Year Published) Example Indigenous Australians being more than 3 times as likely to report diabetes than non-Indigenous Australians (Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, 2012) Popular APA Citation Guides Other APA Citation Guides How to cite a Archive material in APA style How to cite a Artwork in APA style How to cite a Blog in APA style How to cite a Broadcast in APA style How to cite a Chapter of an edited book in APA style How to cite a Conference proceedings in APA style How to cite a Court case in APA style How to cite a Dictionary entry in APA style How to cite a Dissertation in APA style How to cite a E-book or PDF in APA style How to cite a Edited book in APA style How to cite a Email in APA style How to cite a Encyclopedia article in APA style How to cite a Government publication in APA style How to cite a Interview in APA style How to cite a Legislation in APA style How to cite a Magazine in AP Continue reading >>

All Eyes On The World Diabetes Congress

All Eyes On The World Diabetes Congress

This week Melbourne welcomes thousands of visitors from around the world to the 22nd World Diabetes Congress. Diabetes continues to be one of the fastest growing health conditions around the world and it is estimated that 382 million people have diabetes globally, a number expected to rise to 592 million by 20351.In Australia alone, around one million people have been diagnosed with diabetes2 and a further 280 Australians are diagnosed each day3. The five day Congress brings together leading health care professionals, experts in the field of diabetes as well as people with diabetes to discuss issues, share knowledge and raise awareness of diabetes. This is an important event for the eye health sector as diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes, is one of the leading causes of vision loss in Australia. The good news is that if diagnosed and treated early, up to 98 per cent of severe vision loss can be prevented4. Unfortunately, this is not as easy as it sounds, as it is estimated that up to half of people diagnosed with diabetes do not have the recommended regular eye tests once every two years5. Eye tests are essential to identify and diagnose diabetic retinopathy early, before permanent damage to the eye has occurred. There is still much to be done to save the sight of people with diabetes, and this is why all year round eye health organisations actively work towards improving awareness of diabetic eye diseases, their early diagnosis and treatments. The Congress is an opportunity to showcase the great work achieved by the eye health sector in both Australia and the Asia Pacific region ensuring eye health is high on the agenda for discussions. Eye health activity involving Vision 2020 Australia members at the Congress We have brought together below a summary of Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Understanding Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

It’s a safe bet you’ve heard about type 1 and 2 diabetes, as over one million Australians have been diagnosed with the disorders.[1] But, there’s a third kind of diabetes that often flies under the radar that you might not be as familiar with. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs in women who have higher than normal blood glucose levels during pregnancy.[2] So how common is GDM, why does it develop and what are the current recommendations for women to manage the condition? Okay, so let’s look at the incidence of GDM. In the mid 2000s, 4.6% of women in Australia were diagnosed with GDM; however, in recent years, that number has risen to 5-10% of women affected.[2] So why are we seeing this increase? On a simple level, the incidence of GDM is often a reflection of the rates of type 2 diabetes within the population, and we know rates of type 2 diabetes are increasing. But understanding the real reasons why GDM is on the rise is actually quite difficult. For starters, the definition of GDM makes it difficult to determine whether a woman is suffering from a case of undiagnosed diabetes prior to pregnancy or whether she has developed hyperglycaemia due to pregnancy. The important take-away here is for women to be screened at the ideal time to make sure their blood glucose levels are explained by the right thing. The good news is GDM screening has been on the rise since the mid-1990s. But perhaps this increase in more precise diagnosis is a reason why we are seeing a larger incidence of GDM today. To add to the issue, it can be difficult to assess trends in GDM if the diagnostic criteria and tools change frequently, which they do. In the future, uniform definitions for what constitutes GDM as well as standard screening and diagnostic criteria and tools will be im Continue reading >>

The Costs Of Diabetes Among Australians Aged 45–64 Years From 2015 To 2030: Projections Of Lost Productive Life Years (plys), Lost Personal Income, Lost Taxation Revenue, Extra Welfare Payments And Lost Gross Domestic Product From Health&wealthmod2030

The Costs Of Diabetes Among Australians Aged 45–64 Years From 2015 To 2030: Projections Of Lost Productive Life Years (plys), Lost Personal Income, Lost Taxation Revenue, Extra Welfare Payments And Lost Gross Domestic Product From Health&wealthmod2030

Go to: Abstract To project the number of people aged 45–64 years with lost productive life years (PLYs) due to diabetes and related costs (lost income, extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue); and lost gross domestic product (GDP) attributable to diabetes in Australia from 2015 to 2030. A simulation study of how the number of people aged 45–64 years with diabetes increases over time (based on population growth and disease trend data) and the economic losses incurred by individuals and the government. Cross-sectional outputs of a microsimulation model (Health&WealthMOD2030) which used the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers 2003 and 2009 as a base population and integrated outputs from two microsimulation models (Static Incomes Model and Australian Population and Policy Simulation Model), Treasury's population and labour force projections, and chronic disease trends data. 18 100 people are out of the labour force due to diabetes in 2015, increasing to 21 400 in 2030 (18% increase). National costs consisted of a loss of $A467 million in annual income in 2015, increasing to $A807 million in 2030 (73% increase). For the government, extra annual welfare payments increased from $A311 million in 2015 to $A350 million in 2030 (13% increase); and lost annual taxation revenue increased from $A102 million in 2015 to $A166 million in 2030 (63% increase). A loss of $A2.1 billion in GDP was projected for 2015, increasing to $A2.9 billion in 2030 attributable to diabetes through its impact on PLYs. Individuals incur significant costs of diabetes through lost PLYs and lost income in addition to disease burden through human suffering and healthcare costs. The government incurs extra welfare payments, lost taxation revenue and lost GDP, a Continue reading >>

Gen Y To Become Gen Diabetes

Gen Y To Become Gen Diabetes

A new national diabetes assessment released today reinforces a legacy of pandemic proportions being left for future generations – with one in three of today’s Gen Ys joining the ranks of ‘Generation D’ (Generation Diabetes) during their lifetime. This report has prompted Australia’s leading research and consumer advocacy groups to join forces and demand urgent and renewed focus on this significant challenge to the Nation’s health and economy. As an immediate priority re-commitment to the development of a formal national action plan in keeping with the United Nations Resolution no. 61/225 on diabetes is being demanded – a strategic plan which recommends countries review and strengthen critical activities to contain the growth and burden of the disease. “Time is of the essence because unlike other developed nations, despite agreeing with these global recommendations, Australia has failed to take comprehensive action and implement change,” notes Lewis Kaplan, Chief Executive Officer, Diabetes Australia. Diabetes: the silent pandemic and its impact on Australia, launched in Canberra today, is the latest comprehensive assessment of the disease’s rapid growth and its impact on Australians. Researched and written by Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute in partnership with Diabetes Australia, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and Novo Nordisk – the report provides a sobering reminder that in just over a decade (by 2025), our fastest growing chronic disease, (type 2 diabetes) will triple in prevalence and affect three million Australians. A tragic prediction, especially given that type 2 diabetes is potentially preventable in a substantial proportion of people. In addition to this dramatic growth in type 2 diabetes, the report highlights a continuin Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Australia

Diabetes In Australia

An estimated 275 Australians develop diabetes every day. The 2005 Australian AusDiab Follow-up Study (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study) showed that 1.7 million Australians have diabetes but that up to half of the cases of type 2 diabetes remain undiagnosed. By 2031 it is estimated that 3.3 million Australians will have type 2 diabetes (Vos et al., 2004). The total financial cost of type 2 diabetes is estimated at $10.3 billion. Of this, carer costs were estimated as $4.4 billion, productivity losses were $4.1 billion, health system costs were $1.1 billion and $1.1 billion was due to obesity. A reduction in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes will not only result in cost savings in the health budget, but increased participation and productivity in the workforce and, most importantly, better health outcomes and quality of life for Australians. There is no doubt diabetes is a serious health crisis but it’s not all bad news. Up to 60% of cases of type 2 can be prevented and we know that good blood glucose control and maintaining a healthy lifestyle can significantly improve the complications associated with diabetes. Fast Facts 275 Australians develop diabetes every day Diabetes is Australia’s fastest growing chronic disease Nearly 1,000,000 Australians are currently diagnosed with diabetes. For every person diagnosed, it is estimated that there is another who is not yet diagnosed; a total of about 1.7 million people The total number of Australians with diabetes and pre-diabetes is estimated at 3.2 million As the sixth leading cause of death in Australia, it is critical we take action Up to 60% of cases of type 2 diabetes can be prevented. Diabetes: the silent pandemic and its impact on Australia Diabetes Australia welcomes the publication of this comprehe Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

Diabetes: The Silent Pandemic And Its Impact On Australia

‘diabetes: the silent pandemic and its impact on Australia’ — a report written in partnership with Diabetes Australia and Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Continue reading >>

Gen Y Becoming Diabetes Generation

Gen Y Becoming Diabetes Generation

ONE in three people from Generation Y will become part of Generation Diabetes or "Generation D", according to a new national diabetes assessment report. The alarming report, entitled Diabetes: the silent pandemic and its impact on Australia, has prompted some of Australia's leading research and consumer advocacy groups to demand a renewed focus from the Federal Government on the health issue. Diabetes Australia CEO Lewis Kaplan said it should be an immediate priority to recommit to the United Nations resolution to develop a formal national action plan to tackle diabetes. "Time is of the essence because, unlike other developed nations (and) despite agreeing to these global recommendations, Australia has failed to take comprehensive action and implement change," he said. It is estimated that, by 2025, Type 2 diabetes will triple in prevalence and affect three million Australians. However, Type 2 diabetes is potentially preventable in many people. The report says there is a continuing rise in the occurrence of Type 1 diabetes, especially among children aged up to four years, although it is unpreventable. It said prevalence of Type 1 diabetes in Australia was one of the highest in the world and was increasing at about three per cent a year. The report's lead author, Jonathan Shaw from the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, said the future was not looking positive. "What is critical now is for us to take urgent responsibility and act firmly and fast to contain the significant burden our younger generations and children are set to endure," Associate Professor Shaw said. "The battle against diabetes requires concerted efforts on a number of fronts - strategies to slow down the rapidly rising number of those developing the disease and ensuring those living with d Continue reading >>

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