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Diabetes Testing Without Needles

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

We are developing a new non-invasive glucose monitor that will help you take control of your life. (Caution: GlucoWise is still under development and not available for public testing. If you are interested please use the "Get involved" signup form on this page. Due to the overwhelming demand we are unable to respond to individual emails - we are focused on getting the device to the market quickly). Glucowise™ is a non-invasive, 100% pain-free device that makes traditional blood sampling a thing of the past. Our unique sensor technology will allow you to monitor blood glucose levels without the need to pierce your skin. Simple yet highly reliable, Glucowise™ will exceed industry standards for self-monitoring blood glucose accuracy. You will be able to sample as often as you like and wherever you like, ensuring you avoid sudden hypoglycemic events. Our App and Smart Cloud technology delivers personalised advice and alerts, helping you to fully manage your condition. Intelligent analytics will use your current and historical data to calculate and forecast immediate trends in your blood glucose levels, allowing you to adjust your food or medication intake according to your activities or how you are feeling. Glucowise™ will offer unlimited testing without the need for costly consumables, so you can test as often as you like without having to worry about the cost or pain. The compact design will offer you high levels of privacy. It will take no more than 10 seconds to provide a simple, fast and highly discrete testing experience – anytime, anywhere. The data can then sent wirelessly and securely to your smartphone or tablet. Take control There are many situations whereby conventional testing is challenging. Often people with diabetes will unnecessarily expose themselv Continue reading >>

Graphene Skin Patch Measures Blood Sugar Without A Needle

Graphene Skin Patch Measures Blood Sugar Without A Needle

Researchers in the UK have developed a skin patch that measures bloodsugar levels without the prick of a needle by pulling fluid out from between hair follicles. The technology could be used for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. Diabetes is a major global health problem, with the World Health Organization stating 422 million were affected worldwide in 2014. The disease occurs either when the pancreas does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or the body is not able to use its insulin properly (type 2 diabetes), which raises blood glucose levels. Diabetics rely on pricking their skin with a needle daily in order to monitor their blood sugar levels. Researchers at the University of Bath have now developed a needle-free approach for blood sugar testing suitable for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The technology measures glucose levels in the interstitial fluid, which is found in between skin cells. A patchplaced on theskinapplies a small electric field to pull the interstitial fluid up along hair follicles and into the device.Within the patch, the enzyme glucose oxidase the same used for finger-pricking glucose testing reacts with the glucose to produce hydrogen peroxide, which is detected by a graphene sensor. The whole process yields a blood glucose measurement within 15 minutes. The skin patch can offer a high level of accuracy by individually measuring each hair follicle.This decreases the variability of measurements and removes theneed to calibrate the patch with a finger-prick sample. This new technology would be competing with a variety of needle-free glucose monitoring devices that are already in development. For example, GlucoSense, based in London, is developing a device that can obtain measurements in less than 30 seconds . Integrity Applications, an Continue reading >>

Test Your Glucose Level Without Drawing Blood

Test Your Glucose Level Without Drawing Blood

People with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance are advised to spot-check their blood-glucose levels several times daily to reduce the risk of serious complications. That’s a lot of finger-pricking, considering that about 700 million people fall into one of those categories. The Israeli company Integrity Applications put more than a decade into developing GlucoTrack, described as the first truly noninvasive system for self-monitoring glucose levels. Instead of drawing blood, you clip the GlucoTrack sensor to your earlobe. A patented combination of ultrasonic, electromagnetic and thermal technologies works with a proprietary algorithm to measure physiological parameters correlated with glucose level. Results are displayed within about a minute on a USB-connected handheld control unit, which also stores and compares previous readings. The number is announced verbally, facilitating use by elderly and vision-impaired people with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Sales in parts of Europe, South America, Australia and New Zealand began in 2016, after the newest version of the device won regulatory approval in Europe and in South Korea. Integrity is soon beginning clinical trials of GlucoTrack Model DF-F in the United States required for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, and is working toward approval in China. The “DF” stands for David Freger, the late Israeli physicist who envisioned a novel noninvasive glucose monitor. His colleagues Avner Gal and David Malka helped him turn it into reality. “David passed away from diabetes complications at age 48 in 2004, and we called our device models DF to memorialize him,” Gal tells ISRAEL21c. Three technologies The trio’s research revealed several attempts to invent a noninvasive blood-glucose monitor using optic Continue reading >>

Needle-free Diabetes? European Medtech Inventions Which Painlessly Measure Blood Glucose!

Needle-free Diabetes? European Medtech Inventions Which Painlessly Measure Blood Glucose!

Will the daily routine of finger pricking to monitor blood glucose levels finally come to an end for the millions worldwide living with diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease that affects over 422 million people worldwide. It is the major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers it an epidemic and predicts it will become the 7th biggest cause of death worldwide by 2030. To monitor blood glucose levels, millions of diabetics have to test their blood sugar close to 10 times a day by pricking their finger with a lancet to obtain a small blood sample. But some companies in Europe are trying to find a pain-free alternative that removes the need for needles – here are three startups revolutionizing blood sugar testing. GlucoSense (London, UK) GlucoSense is a spin-out of the University of Leeds funded by NetScientific that is developing a non-invasive device based on photonics technology. Its basic component is a nano-engineered silica glass with ions that fluoresce in the infrared region when stimulated by a low power laser. When the glass is in contact with the user’s skin, the reflected fluorescence signal varies based on the concentration of glucose in their blood and one can acquire the glucose concentration measurement in less than 30 seconds. NovioSense (Nijmegen, the Netherlands) NovioSense is a Dutch startup working on an implantable glucose sensor that uses tear fluid to measure glucose levels. The device consists of a 15 mm-long metal coil coated with a hydrophilic gel. Its flexible form allows the device to bend to conform to the surface of the lower eye lid, where the sensor is placed. The coil moves to the correct place in the eye and the gel coating swells to increase conta Continue reading >>

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

Source:Supplied AUSTRALIAN adults with diabetes now have the option of using a new glucose monitoring device, which eliminates the need for regular finger pricking. The system, which has been available in Europe for several years, involves a small sensor the size of a 20 cent coin worn on the upper arm for 14 days. Many diabetics have to draw blood and test their blood glucose levels up to 12 times a day. Instead of doing that, they can now scan the sensor and get a reading in less than a second. The Abbotts FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System also displays an eight-hour history and a trend arrow showing the direction the glucose is heading. The device will make life easier for people living with diabetes who use insulin, whether type 1 or type 2, said Diabetes Australia spokeswoman Renza Scibilia. Source:Supplied “Finger pricking is painful, inconvenient and intrusive, which is often why people don’t check their levels as often as they ideally should,” she told news.com.au. “It’s very different from just wearing a device on your arm and scanning it.” The disposable, water-resistant sensor needs to be replaced every 14 days and costs $95, while the reader is the same price. The Freestyle Libre can be purchased online via the official website. Ashley Ng, 26, from Melbourne, has been testing the device for two weeks and is a big fan. “I didn’t realise how much a burden finger-pricking was until I stopped,” Ms Ng told news.com.au. “Normally I’d prick myself 6-10 times a day. It’s something that I’ve always lived with and gotten used to, and now I don’t have to do it. She said she felt no pain when inserting the sensor into her arm. “The first couple of days I was like ‘Is this for real?’ I was feeling really great. My fingers f Continue reading >>

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Diabetes patients know that one of the greatest challenges in managing the ailment is tracking their blood sugar, or glucose, levels. To do that the only option available today is through the use of standard glucose meters — devices that require multiple finger pricks each day, a painful process. For years, researchers have been trying to find a noninvasive, quicker and easier way to monitor blood glucose. Even the most advanced devices in use today, like needle sensors, which can track glucose continuously, need to be inserted under the skin every one to two weeks. Free Sign Up Now, Caesarea-based startup Cnoga Medical Ltd. says it has come up with a way to track blood glucose levels without pricking or pain. Its glucose meter, already approved for use in numerous countries worldwide, uses a camera to provide a diagnosis of blood glucose levels by observing the changing colors of the user’s finger. During a short training period, the device learns to correlate the user’s skin tone with previous glucose level readings. The technology got the green light on Monday from one of the world’s leading diabetes specialists, Prof. Andreas Pfützner, MD, PhD, who came to Israel to present the company with his findings after having tested the technology in two clinical studies in Germany. “The results were surprising,” he told The Times of Israel in a phone interview. Pfützner held two clinical trials at his institute to validate the performance of the technology, and in both studies he found that the medical device performed “with a surprising level of accuracy,” the same as that of needle sensors. “Cnoga achieved the same level of monitoring as the invasive devices,” he said. “I have not seen this before,” he said. “It is a wonderful device” and a Continue reading >>

Adhesive 'patch' Monitors Blood Glucose Without Needles

Adhesive 'patch' Monitors Blood Glucose Without Needles

Researchers from Cardiff University's School of Engineering have developed a glucose monitor that doesn't require you to prick your finger. It doesn't even need blood after the initial calibration, because it uses microwave to keep track of your glucose levels. The device then sends the data it gathers to an accompanying app. Professor Adrian Porch, one of its creators, told the BBC that its microwave levels are very low and nowhere near what's used for cooking. "Think about a mobile phone," he said, "we're about a thousand times less than that level." The device sticks to your skin with an adhesive and has a longer shelf life, since it doesn't use chemicals. For diabetics who hate having to draw blood frequently -- type 1 diabetics have to prick their fingers up to six times a day, for instance -- this non-invasive monitor could be a godsend. However, it'll take at least five more years of testing before it becomes widely available. Thus far, it's been tested on at least 50 patients at the Swansea University College of Medicine, with more tests to follow this summer. Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Monitor That Spares The Fingers

A Diabetes Monitor That Spares The Fingers

For the past year and a half I’ve been buying a medical device from Italy that has improved my life immeasurably. It wasn’t easy: I roped in a good friend who had moved to Milan to buy the device and ship it to me because it wasn’t yet available in the States. And it was expensive: over $1,600 a year. But my black-market purchase helps me manage my Type 1 diabetes without the need to draw blood from my callused fingers 10-plus times a day to track my glucose level, a ritual that had been an unpleasant part of my life for decades. The FreeStyle Libre, made by Abbott, is a flash glucose sensor that allows people with diabetes to view our blood sugar every minute of the day without a single finger prick. While there are similar devices on the market — called continuous glucose monitors, or CGMs — the Libre is the least invasive one I’ve seen. It takes readings from a sensor under the skin but doesn’t require finger sticks for calibration, and is about the size of a quarter and as thick as two. And it’s helping me keep my diabetes under better control. There have been some challenges: The Milanese UPS store wanted a letter detailing exactly what was in the box. My credit card’s fraud department called (“Yes, the charge for $365 from Milan is mine”). So I was thrilled to learn that the Food and Drug Administration recently approved the sale of the Libre in the United States, a decision that may help some of the 29 million Americans with diabetes. The Libre I buy from Italy has a self-adhesive, waterproof white sensor that sticks to my arm for 14 days. It took some trial and error to get used to it. One sensor flipped off from over-aggressive toweling at the gym; another came loose after a backpack strap nicked it. Finally, rather than the spot on my out Continue reading >>

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Everyone with diabetes should test their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. Knowing the results lets you tweak your strategy for keeping the disease in check, as needed. Regular testing can also help you avoid getting long-term health problems that can stem from the condition. Research shows that in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, sticking to your target blood sugar and HbA1c levels makes complications less likely. 1. Traditional Home Glucose Monitoring You prick your finger with a lancet (a small, sharp needle), put a drop of blood on a test strip, and then place the strip into a meter that displays your blood sugar levels. Meters vary in features, portability, speed, size, cost, and readability (with larger displays or spoken instructions if you have vision problems). Devices deliver results in less than 15 seconds and store this information for future use. Some meters also calculate an average blood sugar level over a span of time. Some also feature software kits that take information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Blood sugar meters and strips are available at your local pharmacy. 2. Meters That Test Other Parts of Your Body. Some devices let you test you upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. These results may differ from the blood sugar levels gotten from a fingertip stick. Levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly. This is especially true when your sugar is changing fast, like after a meal or after exercise. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, don’t rely on test results from other parts of your body. 3. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Some of these devices are combined with insulin pumps. They're not as accurate as finger-stick glucose results. But they can help you find p Continue reading >>

This Stick-on Biosensor Monitors Blood Sugar—no Needle Necessary

This Stick-on Biosensor Monitors Blood Sugar—no Needle Necessary

Measuring your blood sugar may be weirdly trendy, but it you’re one of the 30 million Americans with diabetes, it’s mostly a pain. A literal pain. People with diabetes either have to prick their fingers and draw blood or wear a monitor with a tiny tube inserted into their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells. And sticking a needle in yourself isn’t exactly pleasant. A new biosensor described in a paper published Wednesday in Science Advances suggests a workaround. Instead of a finger prick, an extremely thin, skin-like patch instead uses electrical signals to drive glucose out of nearby blood vessels to the skin’s surface to be measured. The whole thing is powered by a paper battery, and looks a little like a trendy temporary tattoo. In a very small clinical trial of two healthy subjects and a third with diabetes, the device measured blood glucose levels almost as well as a standard clinical blood test during a five-day study. None of the patients reported any irritation or discomfort. A noninvasive or minimally invasive blood glucose monitor is a kind of a holy grail. Not only would it be a huge upgrade in lifestyle for those with diabetes but it could solve some of the problems with patient compliance created by pain, skin irritation, and infections. Not to mention that 30 million people who need to continually monitor their glucose levels is a massive market. There’s been several approaches to doing this, many of them consumer devices that have targeted the wellness market rather than people with diabetes, thus evading FDA regulation. One popular approach uses sweat to measure glucose levels. Earlier this year, rumors circulated that Apple is even chasing a needle-free blood sugar monitor. You might remember that Google also tried Continue reading >>

How To Check Blood Glucose Without Needles

How To Check Blood Glucose Without Needles

If you ask people with diabetes what they dislike most about their disease, often the answer will be having to prick their finger to monitor their blood glucose levels. According to the US National Library of Medicine, "Regularly checking your blood sugar level is one of the most important steps you can take in managing the disease. It provides your doctor with important information regarding the control of your blood sugar." Fortunately, other ways to check your blood sugar levels are appearing on the market. Check for current advances in monitoring devices. Currently, there are a few out on the market--infrared light monitor, skin testing and continuous glucose testing. The first one measures your glucose levels by penetrating your skin with a light, the second is like a watch with a special sensor pad, and the third uses a sensory pad placed under your skin. Both sensory pads will sound an alarm to alert you to your glucose levels. Consider disadvantages. You may not get accurate reading with the infrared light due to fluctuations such as body temperature and blood pressure. The watch may irritate your skin and does not work when you sweat. The third option costs between $1,00 and $2,000 and you need to move it periodically. None of the options are as accurate as the traditional way. Test run all to see which one works best for you. Maybe use two of them to ensure a more accurate reading. Try other skin sites with needles if none of the non-invasive products work for you. While you still will need to use a needle to reach the blood in your arm, abdomen or thigh, it will not be as painful as when you stick your finger tip. Most up-to-date monitors allow use of alternative test sites. If you have an older meter, you may have to upgrade. Julia Derek is a certified Manha Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

People living with diabetes have to prick their fingers to check their blood sugar levels anywhere from one to seven times a day. But now, there’s a better way to monitor blood sugar. This week, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first at-home, needleless system for continuously monitoring glucose for people with diabetes. The system, called FreeStyle Libre Flash, and manufactured by the DC-based Abbott Laboratories, allows users to forgo finger-pricking for up to 10 days at a time. The Flash is essentially a small, circular plastic sensor that sits on top of the skin and detects blood sugar from a small wire that goes under the skin beneath the sensor. People can insert themselves using an applicator that works sort of like a rubber stamp. Once people have applied the sensor on their arms, they can wave a mobile device a little smaller than a smartphone in front of it to read glucose levels. It takes about 12 hours for the wire to become adjusted to the person’s body, but afterward the device takes continuous data that tracks blood sugar over time for over a week. Afterward, you peel the sensor off slowly, and apply a new one. Ideally, this would encourage people with diabetes to check their blood sugar more routinely, Jared Watkin, senior vice president of Abbott’s Diabetes Care unit, told Reuters. Often, people will forgo checking their sugar levels as often as they should because finger pricking can be such a nuisance. Right now it’s only marketed for adults, but the company hopes to receive approval for children under 18 as well. Abbott already has one needle-free blood sugar monitoring system available for the public called the FreeStyle Libre Pro. However, users have to make a special trip to the doctor’s office to have the wire placed und Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

Further proof the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been warming up to modern technology — it has just approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor that doesn’t require the user to prick themselves over and over for a blood sample. Today, the FDA cleared Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a device that uses a small sensor wire inserted under the skin to determine glucose levels in adult diabetics. Another wand-like device is then waved over the sensor to measure and give a readout of those glucose levels. This is a milestone move for the FDA as diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States who currently have to test their blood sugar by pricking themselves several times throughout the day and every time they eat. However, the idea for a prickless blood sugar monitor isn’t new. Tech companies have increasingly shown an interest in the massive diabetics market over the past few years. Apple is rumored to be working on such a device and its CEO Tim Cook has even been spotted wearing a possible prototype that could connect to the Apple Watch. Other companies endeavor to build something similar, including Glucowise, which has a device still under development. However, it seems it’s not so easy to create a needleless blood sugar detector. Google tried to build a contact lens that could detect glucose but it seems the project has gone nowhere since drug company Novartis licensed the tech in 2014. Another FDA-approved device for glucose monitoring without the prick called the GlucoWatch was approved in the early 2000’s, but consumers found it cumbersome and it happened to cause a bad rash in some. But there’s new hope today that the Freestyle monitor has worked out all the kinks. The device is intended for those 18 a Continue reading >>

Glucotrack: Glucose Monitoring Technology Without Needles!

Glucotrack: Glucose Monitoring Technology Without Needles!

For those living with type 2 diabetes, getting access to traditional Continuous Glucose Monitoring systems (CGM systems) is a challenge. And many, especially those on Medicare, are very restricted to the amount of test strips they are given per day. This can lead to missed episodes of high or low blood sugars, though lows are less common with type 2 diabetes. The GlucoTrack system by Ultramedix will give those living with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes a way to painlessly check their glucose levels more frequently without pricking their fingers. While calibration does take roughly 30 minutes to complete, once the system is calibrated, it’s calibrated for 6 months. This will allow those with restricted amounts of strips to be able to track their glucose readings more frequently throughout the day, thus allowing both the patient and the doctor to possibly find areas where improvement can be made in their current therapy. I had the chance to ask the Director of Ultramedix, Saul Freedman, a few questions about the system, such as how it works, who it’s best suited for and why, and pricing. Can you tell me how this works, Saul? The GlucoTrack model DF-F uses a unique and patented combination of 3 different technologies, Ultrasound + Electromagnetic +Thermal, brought together by proprietary algorithm to weigh each measurement and calculate the weighted average of the three readings. Once calibrated, taking a reading is as simple as clipping the Personal Ear Clip (PEC) to the wearers ear lobe to obtain a reading. The reading takes under one minute to complete. And, while the PEC’s are single-user only, the main device can be used by up to three users, which is great for households with more than one person with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Is it really non-invasive Continue reading >>

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