diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Teaching Tools

Development Of Educational Tools For Doctors In Training On Inpatient Diabetes Management

Development Of Educational Tools For Doctors In Training On Inpatient Diabetes Management

Sowmya Gururaj Setty, Heather Daly, Kath Higgins November 29, 2017 Vol 34.9 November / December 2017 The prevalence of diabetes among inpatients is increasing. The National Diabetes Inpatient Audit in 2015 showed that 17% of inpatients have diabetes of whom about 36% are on insulin therapy. The audit highlighted sub-optimal care quality, with harm resulting from inpatient care across several areas of diabetes care. The National Diabetes Mortality and Morbidity project was set up to understand factors contributing to inpatient diabetes harm. The key recommendation arising from this project is mandatory education on inpatient diabetes for all staff. It is critical to take widespread action to improve training and education in inpatient diabetes care in order to reduce and avoid serious diabetes harms occurring in the future. This paper describes educational tools we have developed for staff who care for inpatients with diabetes. IDEA (Inpatient Diabetes Education through Animation) is a novel, effective, unique and appealing model which we have developed, piloted and evaluated in the inpatient diabetes care setting. The INDIE web portal (INpatient DIabetes Education tool for doctors in training) provides easy access to educational resources (knowledge self-assessment, links to educational material, guidelines, guidance and IDEA videos). Around 94% of doctors in training (n=19) rated IDEA videos as relevant and 83% have rated them as useful and will change their practice. Likewise 94% of pharmacists (n=17) rated IDEA videos useful and relevant and 76% rated that the videos would change their practice. Copyright 2017 John Wiley & Sons. Diabetes is an escalating problem with the rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes fuelled by the pandemic of obesity and an ageing population Continue reading >>

Teaching Tools For Diabetes

Teaching Tools For Diabetes

Explaining the pathophysiology of diabetes is no easy task. These fun and effective educational tools that help you explain normal fuel metabolism and the defects associated with type 2 diabetes. In addition, they can be used to motivate patients to lower blood glucose levels through diet, exercise and medications. Fun teaching tool that helps you demonstrate the job of the pancreas. The Pancreas Partner is made from traditional African fabrics and handcrafted by my mother, Becky Dyck, and high school girls participating in Just One Person, an empowerment program for girls in rural Kenya. All profits are donated to www.justoneperson.org . This pillow is soft and stuffed. The beta cells are represented by sparkly balls of different sizes. One side of the pancreas has a normal amount of beta cells, while the other side only has a fraction of normal cells to demonstrate the natural history of diabetes and beta cell loss. A great teaching tool when demonstrating the normal function of basal and bolus insulin. Kids, adults and health care professionals love the Pancreas Partner. Each Pancreas Partner is unique and hand crafted from donated traditional African fabrics. For this reason, material and beta cell color will vary. Thank you for your purchase and contribution to Just One Person. The DiaCell is a fun and effective educational tool that explains normal fuel metabolism and the defects associated with type 2 diabetes. In addition, it can be used to motivate patients to lower blood glucose levels through diet, exercise and medications. We are now offering the DiaBingo as a free download. The player and instructor cards are available for download in English and Spanish below. You just need to print the player cards and pass out beans or chips as markers, so participants Continue reading >>

Patient Education: The Abcs Of Diabetes (the Basics)

Patient Education: The Abcs Of Diabetes (the Basics)

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete. What can I do to stay as healthy as possible if I have diabetes? — If you have diabetes (sometimes called diabetes mellitus), the most important thing you can do is to control your "ABCs": "A" stands for "A1C" – A1C is a blood test that shows what your average blood sugar level has been during the last few months. "B" stands for "blood pressure" – If you have diabetes, controlling your blood pressure is just as important as controlling your blood sugar. High blood pressure puts you at risk for heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. "C" stands for "cholesterol" – Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in the blood. High cholesterol is another factor that increases your risk of heart attacks, strokes, and other serious problems. Why are my ABCs so important? — Compared with people who do not have diabetes, people who have diabetes are 2 to 3 times more likely to have a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes also have heart attacks at a younger age, and that are more severe and more deadly. Plus, people with diabetes are much more likely to get kidney disease. By keeping your ABCs under control, you can lower your risk of these problems by a lot. Isn't my blood sugar the most important thing? — Keeping blood sugar low is important in preventing some problems caused by diabetes, including: Eye diseases that lea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Tools For Healthcare Providers

Diabetes Prevention Tools For Healthcare Providers

DIABETES PREVENTION TOOLS FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS Answer the Call for Diabetes Awareness in Vulnerable Populations American Diabetes Association 2018 Alert Day will sound the alarm about the prevalence of type 2 diabetes by asking everyone to take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. Share this free tool with your patients. The anonymous risk test only takes a minute to complete. By answering questions such as Do you have a family history of diabetes? and Are you physically active? your patients can learn if theyre at risk for type 2 diabetes in 60 seconds. To share the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test, click here . Diabetes Prevention Tools for Healthcare Providers The ADA reported that 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, have diabetes. Diabetes remains the 7th leading cause of death in the United States and continues to be the leading cause of kidney failure, non-traumatic lower-extremity amputations, and blindness among adults aged 20-74. The number of Americans diagnosed with diabetes will continue to grow by 1.4 million every year. Additionally, the CDC reports that 86 MILLION Americans have prediabetes. Representing more than 1 out of 3 with prediabetes Prediabetes is a serious health condition that increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. This page provides a toolbox of information and resources to help providers in the care of their patients with or at risk for prediabetes and/or diabetes. Learn how you can help in the fight against diabetes. The New Jersey Primary Care Association has teamed up with the New Jersey Department of Health to help combat diabetes through the use of Diabetes Resource Coordination Centers (DRCC). A DRCC is a coordinated care model consisting of organizations such as hospitals, physicians and phar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tools For Providers

Diabetes Tools For Providers

The tools section of the Wisconsin Diabetes Mellitus Essential Care Guidelines provides useful resources for providers as well as consumers. Information compiled here is intended to augment individual best practice guidelines by helping to inform and guide diabetes care. These tools should be tailored using individual training, background, and clinical judgment and those using these tools are responsible for appropriate use. Supporting references for these tools are included at the end of each section in the Wisconsin Diabetes Mellitus Essential Care Guidelines. All Tools Entire Tools Section (Wisconsin Diabetes Mellitus Essential Care Guidelines 2012), P-49356-tools (PDF, 4.7 MB) Tools by Section General Recommendations for Care Self-Management Education Medical Nutrition Therapy Glycemic Control Cardiovascular Care Eye Care Emotional and Sexual Health Care Preconception, Pregnancy, and Postpartum Care Assessing Risk and Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes All Diabetes Prevention and Control Program resources are copyright-free. Please duplicate and distribute as many copies of these materials as you desire. Continue reading >>

4 Tools, Resources For Diabetes Care

4 Tools, Resources For Diabetes Care

November marks American Diabetes Month, an annual observance that brings attention to a disease that affects 29 million American adults and, more succinctly, the 25 percent of those who aren't aware of their condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention further estimate nearly 86 million Americans are considered prediabetic-high blood sugar but below type 2 threshold-with 90 percent unaware. It's unsurprising then that many people learn of their diabetes risk through a dilated, comprehensive eye examination from their doctor of optometry. This window into a patient's health uncovers the minute vascular changes that signal diabetes, and reinforces the importance of regular, in-person eye care. AOA members can take advantage of several tools and resources in the fight against diabetes: Eye Care of the Patient with Diabetes Mellitus clinical practice guideline. The AOA's first evidence-based clinical practice guideline is posted to the National Guideline Clearinghouse , and was honored with the American Public Health Association's (APHA's) Vision Care Section Outstanding Scientific Paper (Project) Award in 2015. This guideline provides doctors with a vital resource in the detection and routine screening of people with diabetes, implementing cross-disciplinary evidence-based guidance that is the culmination of 2 years of expert review. Click here to access a summary version of the guideline in a condensed, nine-page quick-reference guide. Continuing education. EyeLearnTM , the AOA's member-exclusive centralized education platform, offers an online catalog of educational courses, webinars and resources to help expand clinical knowledge and practice management expertise for doctors and staff without ever leaving the comfort of their personal computer. EyeLearn wa Continue reading >>

Patient Education Materials

Patient Education Materials

NEW! Introducing 40 Educational Handouts on Using Insulin Low Literacy and Very Low Literacy Versions Available ACU and the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation announce the release of 40 educational handouts for patients who are starting insulin. Each handout is written in easy to understand language with simple illustrations. The handouts are available in both English and Spanish and two literacy levels: low literacy and very low literacy. The handouts are free to download and distribute. Using Insulin to Treat Your Diabetes: What It Means for You English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) About Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Insulin Syringes and Pens English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Injecting Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Needle Safety English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Managing Daily Doses of Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Measuring Your Blood Sugar English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Tracking Blood Sugar Results English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Diet and Exercise English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Travel Tips English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (P Continue reading >>

Educator Tools

Educator Tools

We are committed to developing tools that you can use in your practice and with colleagues. They include tips for helping prescribers understand what you do and the value you bring to the larger diabetes care team, resources that help your group education classes come alive and guidance for implementing best practices in your facility. Additional helpful resources are found within this site's larger Practice area and also in Living with Diabetes . Diabetes Mobile App Search and Share Made Easy The DANA App Review delivers unbiased reviews of nearly 300 healthcare apps, with new apps being added as they are released.This curated library of health apps is available exclusively for AADE members as part of our new Diabetes Advanced Access Network (DANA) online technology initiative. A variety of resources that support the AADE practice paper on Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) Without and With Sensor Integration, including relevant AADE journal articles, educator and patient resources, blog posts, and educational programs. Tip sheets to use whenassisting your patients with understanding how insulin works and teachingproper injection techniques. Includes an overview on understanding how insulin works, learning how to inject, and an insulin assessment checklist. An important public health issue, our hypoglycemia resource page include several practice documents, new resources that provide helpful advice to PWD, journal articles, educational courses and advocacy-related issues. Still the norm for most people with diabetes, these resources include an AADE Practice Paper, a series of practice-focused tip sheets, and advocacy resources related to seniors' access to the supplies they need. Are you reminding your clients about their need for vaccines. Share this CDC Continue reading >>

Michigan Diabetes Research Center: Tools For Health Professionals

Michigan Diabetes Research Center: Tools For Health Professionals

The Brehm Center Systems Biology Repository The Brehm Center Systems Biology Repository is a one-stop online portal providing free and open access to the computer source code and high-resolution datasets from published, peer-reviewed papers in basic and clinical diabetes research. This body of information and knowledge is currently distributed among a large number of different publications and applied to very specific basic science problems or particular clinical situations. Mathematical and computational models are implemented in standard computer model languages to ensure their preservation. More importantly, models are curated to ensure that they accurately reproduce the published results. Guide to Culturally Specific Retinopathy Screening Diabetes is the leading cause of new blindness among adults in the United States. Lack of regular eye exams contributes significantly to this problem. Because of the increased prevalence of diabetes and lack of access to healthcare, many African Americans are at increased risk for developing diabetic retinopathy. The MDRC has collaborated with local agencies to offer free, community-based, eye-disease screening clinics. This project has proven to be effective in identifying and referring African Americans with diabetes who need treatment for retinopathy and other eye diseases. This manual describes the steps needed to develop and conduct community-based, diabetes eye-disease screening clinics. It describes how we collaborated with local agencies to gain sponsor support, recruited physicians and staff, and also describes operational details of planning and implementing an eye-disease screening clinic. This manual also contains sample administrative forms and supply lists as well as a timeline to help plan a screening clinic. Anders Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children

Diabetes In Children

2nd Edition 2013, Janice Selekman, DNSc, RN, NCSN The most complete school nursing text 1356 pages! School nurses and pediatric experts bring you real-world-tested, best practices based on evidence and experience. Thoroughly revised and updated, the 2nd Edition reflects the art and science of school nursing today. Chapter 26, Diabetes Management in the School Setting, Sarah Butler, Tara Kaup, Mary A. Swanson, Susan Hoffmann. Managing Diabetes at School: Tools for the School Nurse This 220-page spiral manual includes a disc containing forms in PDF and WORD formats. It provides school nurses and other diabetes-trained health care professionals with sample IHPs, as well as tools and resources needed for assessment, planning and implementing the IHP. National Association of School Nurses (2013). Section 504 and individuals with disabilities education improvement act The role of the school nurse (Position Statement). Silver Spring, MD: Author. National Association of School Nurses (2014). Service animals in school (Position Statement). Silver Spring, MD: Author. Helping Administer to the Needs of the Student with Diabetes in School (H.A.N.D.S.SM) This program can be hosted as an in-person, continuing education, full-day program or completed online. It equips the school nurse with current diabetes knowledge, and provide tools and resources to facilitate effective diabetes management for students at school. It is presented by a school nurse with a specific interest in diabetes and a Certified Diabetes Educator. Training and support materials that can prepare and educate school staff to provide needed care to students with diabetes. Materials include a toolkit designed for use by a school nurse.Added to this site 09/12/17. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening cond Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Table of Contents Click on any of the links below to access helpful materials on managing all aspects of diabetes that can be printed and given to your patients . Introductory Information 1. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., insulin) 2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., medications) 3. Women and Diabetes: Eating and weight, pregnancy, and heart disease 4. Men and Diabetes: Sexual Issues and employment concerns 5. Diabetes and Your Lifestyle: Exercise, traveling, employment, sexual issues, and special considerations for the elderly General Self-Care (e.g., Blood Glucose, Foot Care) Blood Glucose 6. Pass This Test: Testing blood glucose levels 7. Get off the Blood Glucose Rollercoaster: High/low blood sugar symptoms and treatment A. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Oral Meds): Patient log to record levels B. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Insulin Meds): Patient log to monitor levels Feet 8. Foot Care for People with Diabetes: Hygiene, inspection, and when to call your physician C. TOOL: Foot Care Log Patient log to record self-inspections and any problem areas D. TOOL: Injection Sites Patient log to help rotate injection sites Exercise E. TOOL: Planning Your Exercise: Guide to help patients design an exercise program F. TOOL: Physical Activity Log: Patient log to record physical activity 9. Exercise in Disguise Finding ways to exercise at home and outside of the gym 10. Exercising Like Your Life Depends on It: Health benefits to exercising 11. Hot Weather Exercise: Taking extra care when exercising in hot weather Nutrition/Health Diet/Weight Loss 12. Managing Type 2 Diabetes through Diet: Suggestions for balancing your diet 13. Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes: Weight loss be Continue reading >>

Visual Aids For Diabetes Education

Visual Aids For Diabetes Education

Can teaching tools help people retain their lessons? Director, Center for Innovation in Diabetes Education, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston It's a simple fact of life that even the best lessons are sometimes forgotten or get lost in the bustle of everyday living. That's especially true with a condition as complicated as diabetes: Even when people remember what their doctors tell them, there are a host of forces that get in the way of implementing the advice. "Many people struggle with following all the recommendations and maintaining [blood glucose] at targeted levels," says Katie Weinger, EdD, RN, FAADE, a researcher at the Joslin Diabetes Center. In a landmark national study of intensive blood glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes , for example, fewer than half of the participants managed to get their A1C levels (average blood glucose over two to three months) close to 6 percent at any point, and only 5 percent were able to maintain that level throughout the study. It's not necessarily that there's anything wrong with the diabetes education people are getting. But with funding for follow-up so limitedMedicare pays for 10 hours of diabetes education when people are first diagnosed, and two hours per year after that, for exampleit's often hard to reinforce what patients are told in a lasting way. "One dose of education doesn't last a lifetime, just like a dose of medicine doesn't last forever," Weinger says. "Without structure and support, people slip up: Life is busy, and all this can be overwhelming." One tool that may help is called a Conversation Map. Inspired by tools used in business seminars, the maps were first introduced by Canadian diabetes educators in 2005, and have been promoted since 2007 by the American Diabetes Association as a visual tool used Continue reading >>

Resources And Tools

Resources And Tools

Diabetes Voice is the quarterly magazine of IDF. It covers the latest developments in diabetes care, education, prevention, research, health policy and economics, as well as themes related to living with diabetes. Diabetes Voice goes to the heart of issues that are crucial to all those who can further the promotion of diabetes care, prevention, and a cure worldwide. Editor-in-Chief: Dr Douglas Villarroel (Bolivia) As of July 2018, Diabetes Voice is available as a new digital platform at diabetesvoice.org . Archive content of the magazine is available below. Voices of type 1 diabetes: taking type 1 diabetes to school Taking type 1 diabetes to school is the subject of the second instalment for ourVoices of type 1 diabetesseries which features first person accounts of people living with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes and their perspectives on managing the conditions in our world today. The child who has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes depends upon school policies and a supportive environment to help manage the rigours of an individualised self-management regimen. In order for every child with diabetes to thrive, collaboration between the student, teachers, parents, school administrators, and health care providers is critical to ensure the condition is managed appropriately and safely. All children living with type 1 diabetes require the freedom to manage diabetes in a school setting by monitoring their blood glucose, eating the necessary or appropriate foods, and administering insulin. At a minimum, having access to medically necessary devices and medicines such as needles, insulin pumps and pump supplies, insulin vials or pens, glucose, and various types of monitors in school is essential for health. The right to convey the seriousness of diabetes to others, manage Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Resource Provides Tools And Support To Families Of Newly-diagnosed Children With Type 1 Diabetes

New Diabetes Resource Provides Tools And Support To Families Of Newly-diagnosed Children With Type 1 Diabetes

New Diabetes Resource Provides Tools and Support to Families of Newly-Diagnosed Children with Type 1 Diabetes "KidCare Kit" offers quick-reference materials and multimedia tools to guide families through the first 30 days following a child's diagnosis BRIDGEWATER, N.J., Feb. 3 / PRNewswire-FirstCall / -- Sanofi-aventis U.S. announced today the availability of the diabetes KidCare Kit, a multimedia resource that will provide children and their families with valuable tools and information to help guide them through the difficult but crucial first 30 days following a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. The KidCare Kit was developed in partnership with Children with Diabetes, a national diabetes advocacy group offering support and education for children with diabetes and their families, and is the product of more than a year of research and feedback collected from families of children with diabetes, physicians, certified diabetes educators and other healthcare professionals from across the country. The kit is now available free of charge at participating hospitals and doctor's offices nationwide to families with children that have just received a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes in children and each year more than 15,000 children are diagnosed with diabetes in the United States, which is approximately 40 children per day. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International (JDRF) estimates that as many as 3 million Americans may have type 1 diabetes. "When a child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes it impacts the entire family and parents can often feel emotionally and physically overwhelmed in the first weeks and months following their child's diagnosis," stated Jeff Hitchcock, founder and CEO of Children with Diabetes. "With Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

More in diabetes