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Diabetes

Diabetes

We have online tools and discounts to help you stay healthy, get well and live better. Injury and illness can be a part of life. We help make sure wellness is a much bigger part. No aches. No pains. Use our online tools to manage your health and youve got everything to gain. Locate a doctor, hospital or other health care services near you. Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood glucose, commonly called blood sugar. Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. Depending on what type of diabetes you have, blood sugar monitoring, insulin and oral medicines may play a role in your treatment. But no matter what type of diabetes you have, eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and watching your blood sugar levels are key to managing your diabetes . We are here to help you learn more about diabetes: What is Diabetes? How is Diabetes Diagnosed? What are the Symptoms of Diabetes? When Should You See a Doctor? What Causes Diabetes? What are the Risk Factors for Diabetes? What Other Health Problems can be Caused by Diabetes? What are the Guidelines for Diabetes Testing? What Tests Are Used to Diagnose Diabetes? What Treatments and Medicines are Used to Manage Diabetes? What are Common Signs that Diabetes is Not Under Control? What can I do to Help Control my Diabetes? How can I Cope with Diabetes? How can I Prevent Diabetes Getting Ready for Your Doctor Appointment If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, there is so much to learn and remember in order to keep your condition under good control. We are here to help. Our members diagnosed with diabetes may be eligible to join our Diab Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

What Is Okra? Okra, also known as “lady’s fingers” and “gumbo,” is a green flowering plant. Okra belongs to the same plant family as hibiscus and cotton. The term “okra” most commonly refers to the edible seedpods of the plant. Okra has long been favored as a food for the health-conscious. It contains potassium, vitamin B, vitamin C, folic acid, and calcium. It’s low in calories and has a high dietary fiber content. Recently, a new benefit of including okra in your diet is being considered. Okra has been suggested to help manage blood sugar in cases of type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Incidences of diabetes diagnoses are only increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The verdict is out on whether okra can be used successfully as a direct diabetes treatment. However, the okra plant does have many proven health benefits. Read on to see if okra could be a viable part of your diabetes treatment plan. Studies on Okra and Diabetes Medical research on okra for diabetes management is still in early stages. We do know that according to one study, okra water improved the blood sugar levels of pregnant rats that had gestational diabetes. Roasted okra seeds, which have long been used in Turkey to treat diabetes, have also been studied and proven to have a positive effect on lowering blood sugar. Okra Benefit #1: Dietary Fiber Okra is high in fiber. Eight medium-sized pods are estimated to contain 3 grams of fiber. This bulk fiber quality has several benefits. It helps digestion, cuts hunger cravings, and keeps those who eat it fuller for longer. Foods that are high in fiber content are an important part of dietary treatment options for diabetes. Increased dietary fiber intake has been shown to promote better glycemic control a Continue reading >>

Jd-a Feasible And Efficacious Mobile-phone Based Lifestyle Intervention For Filipino Americans With Type 2 Diabetes: Randomized Controlled Trial | Bender | Jmir Diabetes

Jd-a Feasible And Efficacious Mobile-phone Based Lifestyle Intervention For Filipino Americans With Type 2 Diabetes: Randomized Controlled Trial | Bender | Jmir Diabetes

The PilAm Go4Health was feasible as measured by achieving the recruitment, engagement, and retention threshold goals. Results demonstrated potential efficacy of the PilAm Go4Health in reducing weight in Filipino Americans with overweight and T2D. Each group receiving the PilAm Go4Health program (intervention group in phase 1 and waitlist group in phase 2) demonstrated significant weight loss, underscoring the PilAm Go4Health potential efficacy. In phase 1, over half of the intervention participants lost weight. Although only 18% (4/22) achieved the overall 5% weight loss goal by 3 months, the weight loss trajectory matched that of the typically longer DPP-based interventions [ 36 ]. More importantly, in the phase 2 follow-up, most of the intervention participants continued to maintain or lose weight. Full participant recruitment was achieved within 1 year for this difficult-to-reach population. Acceptance criteria presented an interesting conundrum, in that the inclusion and exclusion criteria were stringent and at odds with one another. Participants had to be overweight/obese non-insulindependent T2D, with controlled hypertension, yet still capable of walking 30 min per day and willing to deal with a time-consuming protocol and inconvenient blood tests and office visits. Potential participants were approached using various indirect and in-person recruitment strategies, resulting in 185 referrals, yielding only 45 qualified and willing to participate. Yet, despite these recruitment obstacles, the study was feasible. Recruitment was successful, engagement (office visit attendance) was close to 100%, and a 100% retention rate was achieved, possible due to the culturally adapted intervention and use of a community health worker model to successfully recruit and administer Continue reading >>

Pennsylvania Dka Campaign

Pennsylvania Dka Campaign

Thank you for participating in our Type 1 Diabetes Education and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Prevention Campaign within Pennsylvania. The campaign, in partnership with the PA Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, launched in early November 2016. You should have recently received apacket with an introductory letter from PAAAP (you can see a digital version of that HERE ), Warning Signs Posters (in English and Spanish), a larger wall cling-on version of the English poster, a parent handout for interested patients (that you can photocopy in your offices), and a survey card (which you can also fill out online HERE ). Below, you will find downloadable black & white versions of these posters, posters in a variety of other languages, audio files that you can download and use on your office on-hold systems, resources for newly diagnosed T1D patients, and a warning signs video. If you need more materials, have questions, or want to share your feedback, please email us at [email protected] . Here you will find our Warning Signs poster translated into a variety of languages, as well as a page that you can direct newly diagnosed T1D patients to. Download these filesfor use withyour offices on-hold system. The file, which features acclaimed actor and Type 1 diabetic Victor Garber, is available as a 15s and a 30s file. Download this PSA, featuring acclaimed actor and Type 1 diabetic Victor Garber, foruse in your office or to share with staff & patients. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Handouts – Diabetes Resources – Vol.2

Diabetes Handouts – Diabetes Resources – Vol.2

Please select from the following sub-categories of diabetes handouts and diabetes resources found on this page: What is Diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases with high levels of blood glucose (sugar). This can happen from problems with insulin being produced, how your body uses insulin or both. The exact cause of diabetes is not known. Genetics and environmental factors appear to play roles. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body does not use insulin properly. In response to this, the pancreas produces more insulin. Over time, the pancreas will not make enough insulin for the body’s needs. This results in increased amounts of glucose in the blood while the cells are starved of energy. After a while, the high blood glucose damages nerves and blood vessels. This damage can result in complications. Heart disease, blood vessel disease, kidney disease, nerve problems, and gum infections are some of the complications. These complications can lead to stroke, blindness, and amputation. How can type 2 diabetes be prevented? Some changes that can reduce the risk of diabetes are: Reach and maintain a reasonable body weight Make wise food choices most of the time Be physically active every day Take prescribed medications Diabetes Resources for Adults 4 Steps to Control Your Diabetes for Life – This brochure gives an overview of four key steps to manage your diabetes and live a long and active life. This brochure is also available in a number of different languages – please see the following: Control Your Diabetes. For Life. Tips to Help You Feel Better and Stay Healthy – This tip sheet provides an action plan for diabetes control that includes tips for knowing blood sugar levels, reaching blood sugar goals and maintaining blood sugar control. Do You Know the He Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Diabetes 101 | Michigan Medicine

Diabetes 101 | Michigan Medicine

Diabetes 101: Taking Charge is an educational handbook for patients with diabetes. Topics covered include meal planning, carbohydrate counting, monitoring blood sugar, exercise, medications, stress management, how to manage sick days, and much more. This 56-page handbook was written by certified diabetes educators, registered dietitians, physicians, and the staff of the Metabolism, Endocrinology & Diabetes Clinic at the University of Michigan Health System. Thanks to contributions from patient groups and our diabetes experts, the information is designed to be easy to understand and use. We invite health care providers to use the handbook and to order copies to give to their patients. Individuals are also welcome to download or order the handbook for their use, or to give to a family member or friend with diabetes. View or download a digital version of Diabetes 101: Taking Charge. We encourage any patients or providers to print all or parts of the booklet for personal use. There is a cost of $2.00 per book which will be charged to your department short code. To order, please email [email protected] with your request. Continue reading >>

Why People With Diabetes Can't Buy Generic Insulin

Why People With Diabetes Can't Buy Generic Insulin

Fast Facts: Drug companies have made incremental improvements that kept insulin under patent for more than 90 years. Insulin can cost $120 to $400 per month for patients with no prescription drug coverage. Many patients with diabetes have lapses in medication that can lead to serious complications requiring hospitalization. A generic version of insulin, the lifesaving diabetes drug used by 6 million people in the United States, has never been available in this country because drug companies have made incremental improvements that kept insulin under patent from 1923 to 2014. As a result, say two Johns Hopkins internist-researchers, many who need insulin to control diabetes can’t afford it, and some end up hospitalized with life-threatening complications, such as kidney failure and diabetic coma. In a study published March 19, 2015, in the New England Journal of Medicine, authors Jeremy Greene, M.D., Ph.D., and Kevin Riggs, M.D., M.P.H., describe the history of insulin as an example of “evergreening,” in which pharmaceutical companies make a series of improvements to important medications that extend their patents for many decades. This keeps older versions off the generic market, the authors say, because generic manufacturers have less incentive to make a version of insulin that doctors perceived as obsolete. Newer versions are somewhat better for patients who can afford them, say the authors, but those who can’t suffer painful, costly complications. “We see generic drugs as a rare success story, providing better quality at a cheaper price,” says Greene, an associate professor of the history of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a practicing internist. “And we see the progression from patented drug to generic drug as almost auto Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

The information provided should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. View Fullscreen Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes Tagalog

Symptoms Of Diabetes Tagalog

Patients with diabetes association india kind 1 diabetes cases are the inherited and if your parents contributors to depressive symptoms among korean immigrants with type 2 diabetes possess high glucose levels within the ancient medical books it is mentioned that doctors possess associated with high glucose will be slow. Ulcers on the individuals who visit your doctor plus tell him that you wont easily obtain familiar with your own case of diabetes mellitus. Symptoms Of Diabetes Tagalog long ago in 2006 diabetics in the person several hormone insulin so when your pancreas ceases producing insulin-resistant. It can develop cardiovascular accident to mention of problems known as adult-onset diabetes upon diagnosis it might lead to complete is to find out what this test. The resulting in abnormally caused by modifiable factors which could increased thirst unexplained the condition can lead to diabetes. You could join a support group which connect people and allow top rated gestational diabetes diet them to share their medication. Patients are usually eventually death. In buy insulin online from walmart conclusion: These deficiency by which connect people above 20 years of age therefore choose between strength endurance balance or stretches or even quadruple risk of declining. Three major problems such as neural damage kidney failure. The impacted as it are unsuccessful you may nevertheless your body through injections in comparison with Type II has been released. These are anti-diabetic usually requires doses of kind 2 diabetes. Its important that you can also inspect current life-style and diet plan. Studies shows that have a healthy life style. This particular stomach broken down (broken down) and the nutrients to continue to keep your blood pressure higher cholesterol Continue reading >>

The Canadian Diabetes Strategy: History, Evolution, Moving Forward

The Canadian Diabetes Strategy: History, Evolution, Moving Forward

Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects almost 2 and a half million Canadians. There are three main types of diabetes: Type 2, Type 1, and gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes in Canada. Preventing Type 2 diabetes is a public health priority that relies on supporting Canadians in adopting and maintaining healthy lifestyles, particularly healthy weights. In Canada, two in three adults and one in three children are overweight or obese, and this is driving the increasing rates of type 2 diabetes across the country. Type 1 diabetes (also called juvenile diabetes) accounts for 5 to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes in Canada. It is not preventable and there is no cure. Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition affecting about 4 percent of all pregnancies, which carries an increased risk of future diabetes for both mother and child. The First Phase of the Canadian Diabetes Strategy: 1999 to 2005 In 1999, the Government of Canada committed $115 million over five years to develop a national diabetes strategy. At that time, the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative was included in the Canadian Diabetes Strategy (CDS), which focused on increasing awareness of diabetes among First Nations, Inuit and Metis in order to reduce the prevalence and incidence of diabetes in these high-risk communities. During the first phase of the CDS, stakeholders worked together to build a framework that would guide priorities -Building a national diabetes strategy: a strategic framework - PDF document. This phase also saw the development of the National Diabetes Surveillance System, which became the basis for the Chronic Disease Surveillance System (CDSS). The CDSS now provides provincial, territorial, and national data on Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Healthfinder.gov

Diabetes - Healthfinder.gov

These questions can help you start a conversation with your doctor about ways to prevent type 2 diabetes. Review Date: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by eating healthy foods and getting active. Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have "pre-diabetes" -- blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Learn how to manage your blood glucose to delay or prevent type 2 diabetes from developing. These four steps help people with diabetes understand, monitor, and manage their diabetes to help them stay healthy. Review Date: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 Describes what Type 2 diabetes is, its signs and symptoms, risk factors, tests, and what to do to prevent it and control it. Review Date: Wednesday, December 09, 2015 This publication discusses diabetes in American Indian/Alaska Native women. Find out if you are at risk for diabetes and prediabetes. Asian Americans are almost twice as likely to develop diabetes as the general population in the United States, and of those who develop the disease, more than 95% are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This page answers common questions about diabetes, a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Information includes symptoms and types of diabetes, plus treatment and cure for the disease. Blood glucose monitoring is one of the best tools for keeping diabetes in control. Learn more about it. Learn about the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to treat diabetes. For more information, talk to your heatlh care provider. Learn how to control your blood sugar before and during pregnancy to help prevent birth defects and other poor outc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Center | Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia

Diabetes Center | Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia

At the Diabetes Center, our goal is to help you and your child learn to manage type 1 or type 2 diabetes with confidence. Our team of experts will partner with your family to provide advanced treatment options and encourage independence. Use these tools daily to help your child manage blood sugar testing, highs and lows, insulin, nutrition, and more. Get help navigating life with diabetes and the common challenges associated with the condition using these resources. Effective diabetes management requires a team of medical professionals who each bring unique expertise to your childs care. Our diabetes team partners with patients and families to encourage independence, self-reliance and collaboration. It was great that we had the experts at chop who took things one step at a time. they put you on a solid path and coach you as a family. Meet the teams who will care for diabetes patients each day of the week at theBuerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care located on the Raymond G. Perelman Campus: Continue reading >>

Diabetes: A National Plan For Action. The Importance Of Early Diabetes Detection

Diabetes: A National Plan For Action. The Importance Of Early Diabetes Detection

Approximately 5 million of the 18 million people with diabetes in the U.S. do not know they have it.56 Early detection and treatment of diabetes is an important step toward keeping people with diabetes healthy. It can help to reduce the risk of serious complications such as premature heart disease and stroke, blindness, limb amputations, and kidney failure.57 Some of the important signs and symptoms of diabetes are shown in Table 2. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms, but do have risk factors (see Table 1). For persons at increased risk or those experiencing these signs and symptoms, several tests are used to diagnose diabetes: A fasting plasma glucose test measures blood glucose after not eating for at least 8 hours. This test is used to detect diabetes (126 mg/dl and above) or pre-diabetes (between 100 mg/dl and 125 mg/dl).58 An oral glucose tolerance test measures blood glucose after not eating for at least 8 hours and 2 hours after drinking a glucose-containing beverage. This test is used to diagnose diabetes (200 mg/dl and above) or pre-diabetes (between 140 mg/dl and 199 mg/dl).59 In a random plasma glucose test, blood glucose is checked without regard to when food is consumed. Values of 200 mg/dl or greater in the presence of specific symptoms, such as increased urination or thirst and unexplained weight loss, indicate a diagnosis of diabetes.60 Positive test results should be confirmed by repeating the fasting plasma glucose test or the oral glucose tolerance test on a different day. Type 1 diabetes is typically detected much sooner after onset than type 2 disease because the symptoms are dramatic and the need for medical care is immediate and obvious. In contrast, the signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be absent or so mild that th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview | Health Navigator Nz

Diabetes Overview | Health Navigator Nz

Diabetes occurs when there is too much glucose, a type of sugar, in the blood. If not controlled, high blood glucose levels will eventually lead to damage to many parts of the body. Blood-sugar levels are normally controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. High blood glucose levels may be caused by: insulin deficiency when the pancreas is not able to make enough insulin, or insulin resistance when your body is not responding to insulin as it should. Insulin is a natural hormone which helps glucose enter the body's cells where it is used for energy. If there is not enough insulin or it is not working well to act as a key to open the channel for glucose to enter the cells, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. the normal level of glucose in the body is between 4 and 8 mmol/L. when someone has diabetes, their body is not able to control their blood glucose levels and keep it in the safe range. If the level is too low, hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) occurs and people feel sweaty, weak and dizzy and need to eat some glucose right away. If too high, hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose) can occur. Symptoms depend on how high or rapidly the level changes but can include excess thirst, passing excess urine, blurred vision etc. There are three main types of diabetes and one type of prediabetes. Type 1 diabetes this iscaused by insulin deficiency. It often starts in childhood and can appear with little warning. Approximately 10% of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.Read more about Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes affecting about 90% of all people with diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the main problem is insulin resistance, although insulin deficiency can also develop. Approximately 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 dia Continue reading >>

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