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Diabetes Symptoms Taste

Diabetes Type Ii: Overview

Diabetes Type Ii: Overview

Alternative names: Adult Onset Diabetes, Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) Type 2 Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that leads to sugar (glucose) accumulating in the blood rather than being used as fuel by cells in the body. It is caused by a combination of insulin resistance (loss of sensitivity to insulin) and insulin deficiency. Over time, elevated blood sugar levels can lead to very serious complications. Type 2 Diabetes represents some 90-95% of all diabetes cases. The other main type of diabetes is Type 1 Diabetes, also known as Juvenile Diabetes or Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM), in which the body does not produce enough insulin. This is an autoimmune-related disease that usually strikes between the age of 5 and 20 years. A third and newer type of diabetes, unofficially classified as Type 1.5 Diabetes, has features in common with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is also found in a variety of other common disease states including hypertension, atherosclerosis, obesity and polycystic ovarian syndrome. In some of these conditions insulin resistance has been shown to be an independent risk factor contributing to the disease and its complications. Incidence; Causes and Development; Contributing Risk Factors Type 2 Diabetes was once thought to be a disease of middle age, but with childhood obesity being on the rise, cases are being diagnosed at every age. The majority of Type 2 diabetics are still over 55. About 1-in-4 people with Type 2 Diabetes are unaware that they have it. Impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance is very common in Western society, afflicting tens of millions of individuals in the United States alone. Type 2 Diabetes is more common in older people, especially older women who are overweight. Native Continue reading >>

What Causes A Sweet Taste In The Mouth?

What Causes A Sweet Taste In The Mouth?

Eating sugary or sweet foods can cause a temporary sweet aftertaste in the mouth. However, a persistent sweet taste in the mouth can be a sign of a more serious condition. A sweet taste in the mouth can be a signal of the body having trouble regulating blood sugar, which may be due to diabetes. There is also a range of other possible causes, each requiring specific care. Causes Unlike an aftertaste caused by eating foods containing sugar or artificial sweeteners, a persistent sweet taste in the mouth is typically caused by an underlying medical condition. These conditions can be serious and will often require medical attention, so it is vital to receive a proper diagnosis. Diabetes Diabetes is a common cause of a sweet taste in the mouth. Diabetes affects how well the body can use insulin, which has a direct effect on the body's ability to control blood sugar. Uncontrolled diabetes can result in high levels of sugar in the blood. Diabetes can sometimes cause a sweet taste in the mouth and is often accompanied by other symptoms. Additional symptoms include: reduced ability to taste the sweetness in foods blurred vision excessive thirst excessive urination Diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetes may also cause a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. This happens when the body cannot use sugar for fuel and begins using fat instead. This causes an acid called ketones to build up in the body. Excess ketones in the body can cause a sweet, fruity smell and taste in the mouth. Diabetic ketoacidosis may cause other symptoms, including: extreme thirst confusion fatigue nausea and vomiting abdominal cramping Low carb dieting People who are on low carbohydrate diets may find that they develop a similar fruity, sweet taste in the mouth. Carbohydrates are a common source of fuel Continue reading >>

Salty Taste In Mouth & Diabetes: Complications And Remedies

Salty Taste In Mouth & Diabetes: Complications And Remedies

Salty Taste in Mouth & Diabetes: Complications and Remedies People with diabetes may suffer from a taste disorder that causes a salty, bad or sour taste in the mouth. Other complications of diabetes that may affect the sense of taste include dry mouth due to high blood sugar levels and neuropathy affecting the mouth nerves. Sufferers of salty taste in mouth diabetes may be at a higher risk of gum disease, dental cavities and other oral problems. Diabetics may have an increased risk of taste disorders , according to an article posted on Diabetes Self-Management by Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE. One taste disorder is dysgeusia, which causes a bad, sour or salty taste in the mouth. What's more, recently people with type 2 diabetes often experience problems tasting sweet foods. As a result, the taste of salt in food may become stronger. Also called xerostomia, dry mouth is a condition that many patients with diabetes suffer from due to high blood sugar levels and diabetes medication, notes the American Diabetes Association . Lack of saliva in the mouth can affect the sense of taste as well as impact chewing and swallowing. If you suffer from salty taste in mouth from diabetes , you should visit your dentist regularly for checkups. Dry mouth could be causing your mouth to taste salty, which means that you're at an increased risk of cavities and gum disease. Saliva washes food particles away from the teeth and discourages the growth of bacteria that cause tooth decay. Accordingly, patients suffering from dry mouth lose some of the protective effects of saliva. Remedies for Salty Taste in Mouth for Diabetics Medications prescribed by a physician help control the symptoms of diabetes, but sufferers of taste disorders and dry mouth can also improve their symptoms with lifestyl Continue reading >>

What’s Causing A Sweet Taste In My Mouth?

What’s Causing A Sweet Taste In My Mouth?

What is this condition? Sweetness is one of at least five basic tastes detected by the tongue’s taste buds. Others include sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and a balanced flavor called umami. Normally you’ll only taste sweetness after eating something that contains sugar. This could be something more natural, like honey or fruit, or something processed, like ice cream. Some medical conditions can cause a person to experience a sweet taste in their mouth even if they haven’t eaten something sweet. Continue reading to learn more. Doctors are still learning more about the causes of this unusual symptom. However, some causes appear to include: Metabolic problems, such as diabetes, ketosis, or a thyroid disorder. Metabolic disorders can affect the body’s ability to taste, causing a background sweet taste in the mouth and large preference for very sweet-tasting foods. Neurological problems, such as stroke, seizure disorder, or epilepsy. A sweet taste in the mouth can be an early symptom of neurological issues. Viruses that attack the body’s ability to smell. Disruptions in the body’s olfactory system — the system that allows the body to smell — can result in a sweet taste in the mouth. Infection in the sinuses, nose, and throat. Certain bacteria, especially pseudomonas, can cause a sweet taste in the mouth. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Stomach acid backs up into the throat and mouth, causing a sweet taste. Small cell carcinoma in the lung. A sweet taste is an early symptom of this condition. Pregnancy. Many women experience a strange taste in their mouth in the early stages of pregnancy. Some women might describe it as sweet or metallic. These conditions cause a sweet taste in the mouth by affecting the body’s sensory, or nervous, system. This is Continue reading >>

7 Reasons For A Strange Taste In The Mouth

7 Reasons For A Strange Taste In The Mouth

Home Current Health Articles 7 Reasons for a Strange Taste in the Mouth 7 Reasons for a Strange Taste in the Mouth The taste sensation is one of the many ways that we experience our environment. It is useful for assessing foods and fluids and can bring tremendous pleasure in what we eat and drink. It also plays an important role in compelling us to eat or avoid certain substances that can either nourish us or harm us. We always associate taste with whatever we put in our mouths. But sometimes there can be tastes elicited even though we have not eaten or drunk anything. If your taste sensation is disrupted, the medical term is dysgeusia. When we experience a bad taste in the mouth it is known as cacogeusia. A funny taste in the mouth goes beyond abnormal taste sensations when tasting something. These strange tastes may however be emanating from the body itself. Apart from saliva which we feel but do not taste, there a host of other substances and secretions from the body that can stimulate the taste sensation. It can even be due to different disorders affecting the taste centers in the brain even without putting any substance in the mouth. Acid reflux is a common problem. It is more correctly known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) where the acidic contents of the stomach pass up into the esophagus. Typically it causes heartburn and nausea but some people have no symptoms. The acid can reach up as high as the throat, mouth and even the nose. The acid not only damages the tissue lining the esophagus, throat and mouth. It can also be tastes and has a characteristic sour taste. Most of the time you would be able to identify a sour taste in the mouth as being due to stomach acid when it is accompanied by heartburn, nausea and indigestion. However, people who suffer Continue reading >>

What Causes A Bitter Taste In The Mouth?

What Causes A Bitter Taste In The Mouth?

Having a bitter taste in your mouth while you’re consuming something bitter, like chicory or black coffee, is expected. Having a chronic bitter taste in your mouth, regardless of what you’re eating or drinking, is not normal and can indicate one of several health conditions. Read on to learn more about the causes of a bitter taste in the mouth, when you should seek help, and how you can get rid of this symptom. Having a bitter taste in your mouth is often not a serious problem, but it can interfere with your daily life and affect your diet. Burning mouth syndrome As the name implies, burning mouth syndrome causes a burning or scalding sensation in the mouth that can be very painful. These symptoms can occur in one part of the mouth or all over the mouth. It can also produce a feeling of dry mouth and a bitter or metallic taste. Burning mouth syndrome occurs in both women and men, especially in women who are going through menopause and beyond. Sometimes burning mouth has no identifiable cause. Doctors suspect it may be due to damage to the nerves in the mouth. It may also be linked to underlying conditions or treatments for conditions like diabetes mellitus, cancer treatment, and hormonal changes during menopause. Pregnancy The female hormone estrogen, which fluctuates during pregnancy, can also alter taste buds. Many women report a bitter or metallic taste in their mouths when they’re pregnant. This usually resolves sometime later in the pregnancy or after giving birth. Dry mouth The feeling of dry mouth, also known as xerostomia, can be caused by a decrease in salivary production or change in the makeup of saliva. The decrease can happen for a number of reasons, including: aging certain medications an autoimmune disease, such as Sjögren syndrome, which causes ex Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Taste Disorders

Diabetes And Taste Disorders

People tend to take their ability to taste for granted — until they’re literally left with a bad taste in their mouths, or favorite foods no longer hold appeal to them. Impaired taste and taste disorders can lead to health and nutritional problems, and can affect one’s quality of life, as well. There’s some evidence that people who have diabetes are more prone to developing taste disorders. Some stats According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), about 15% of adults may have a taste or a smell issue; however, only about 200,000 people each year seek medical help for these conditions. It’s also estimated that almost 75% of adults ages 57–85 have impaired taste. What is taste, anyway? Your ability to taste is due to taste cells that are clustered within taste buds on the tongue, the roof of the mouth, and within the lining of the throat. You’re born with about 10,000 taste buds; this number may decline as you get older. When you chew, drink, and digest food, molecules in the food are released that stimulate the taste cells. The taste cells have receptors that respond to the basic taste qualities of sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami (the savory taste that comes from foods containing glutamate, such as chicken broth and meat extracts). You also experience taste from thousands of nerve endings in the surfaces of the mouth, nose, throat, and even eyes. The nerve endings help you experience the heat from hot and spicy foods, the cool tingle from minty foods, and the aroma from a freshly brewed cup of coffee. The aroma of a food also contributes to a food’s taste. This gives you the ability to distinguish between, say, eating a banana and eating an apple. Taste disorders Common taste disorders come with funny name Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Diabetic Tongue - Could It Be A Diagnostic Criterion?

Diabetic Tongue - Could It Be A Diagnostic Criterion?

Go to: Discussion Studies that have shown an increase in prevalence of diabetes in India have also reported a very high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes in the community. The individuals who are unaware of their disease status are left untreated only to present at a later stage with complications. The disease tends to progress more rapidly in individuals not receiving appropriate intervention. Hence, it is necessary to detect them early and provide necessary treatment.[2] Taste disorders form a common part of presentation of several diseases. Taste loss may occur in physiological conditions like ageing, pregnancy, and menopause. Patients with xerostomia, Sjögren's syndrome, and zinc deficiency also experience taste loss. Other conditions in which taste loss may occur include liver and kidney disorders, DM, depression, and surgical procedures around the chorda tympani or glossopharyngeal nerve. Patients with head trauma and epilepsy may also experience taste loss. Numerous drugs (methotrexate, dexamethasone, antihypertensives, and antimicrobial agents) have been associated with taste loss.[3] Taste disorders have been described in the past during the course of DM. Le Floch et al.,[4] in 1989 had mentioned about the decrease of the diabetic individual's ability to detect and recognize the primary taste modalities. An Indian study in 2012 evaluating 50 cases of DM with oral complications found taste impairment in 20% cases.[5] Another Indian study found that taste alteration was more common in uncontrolled diabetics than in controlled diabetics.[6] Electrogustometric examination in 73 patients from Czech Republic showed that about 40% of type 2 DM have hypoguesia and 5% have aguesia.[7] A 2009 Spanish study concluded that hyperglycemia induces a concentration-dependent Continue reading >>

Bad Taste In Mouth, Bitter Almond Odor On Breath, Fruity Odor On Breath And Metallic Taste In Mouth

Bad Taste In Mouth, Bitter Almond Odor On Breath, Fruity Odor On Breath And Metallic Taste In Mouth

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms bad taste in mouth, bitter almond odor on breath, fruity odor on breath and metallic taste in mouth including Diabetic ketoacidosis, Medication reaction or side-effect, and Diabetes, type 1. There are 9 conditions associated with bad taste in mouth, bitter almond odor on breath, fruity odor on breath and metallic taste in mouth. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include dry mouth, excessive thirst and urination, and more. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Diabetes, type 1 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Constipation (child) Constipation is having less than three bowel movements a week, causing hard stools, abdominal pain and more. Antibiotic use Antibiotics can cause stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, itching, rashes and dizziness. Cyanide poisoning The symptoms of cyanide poisoning include headache, weakness, confusion, nausea, and seizures. Dry mouth Symptoms of dry mouth include sticky mouth, dry and cracked lips and tongue, sore throat, cavities, and more. Poisoning Poisoning can cause nausea, vomiting, drooling, dry mouth, changes in pupil size, and more. Constipation (adult) Constipation is having less than three bowel movements a week, causing hard stools, abdominal pain and more. Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Levels & Funny Taste In The Mouth

Low Blood Sugar Levels & Funny Taste In The Mouth

When you consume carbohydrates in things like breads, pasta, fruit and sweets, your body converts them to glucose, a type of sugar. Your body then burns the glucose to create energy. Simple carbohydrates such as fruits, refined sugar and white rice are converted to energy quickly and are used up just as quickly. Complex carbohydrates like whole grains give you longer-lasting energy and leave you feeling full longer. You should try to consume more complex than simple carbohydrates. Your body needs a steady diet of carbohydrates because it doesn't store them like it does fat. If you haven't consumed enough carbohydrates to keep your blood glucose up, that's known as having low blood sugar or hypoclycemia. When that happens, your body begins burning fat for energy. When your body burns fat for energy, the fat breaks down and creates chemicals called ketones. This is called ketosis. A byproduct of ketones is a chemical called acetone. Your body gets rid of the acetone in your body by breathing it out, which is why you may have a funny taste in your mouth. Your breath may smell funny to others when you're experiencing ketosis as well. Some people describe the taste and smell as a fruity or sweet taste, while others say it tastes metallic. Who Experiences Ketosis People with diabetes who experience a drop in blood glucose and insulin often experience ketosis; in this case it's known as diabetic ketoacidosis. If you are experiencing diabetic ketosis it's important to eat or take a glucose tablet as soon as possible and call your doctor or an ambulance if your condition doesn't improve. People who are following a weight loss diet low in carbohydrates and high in protein also frequently experience ketosis as their bodies burn off the fat they're trying to lose. Ketosis may be se Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Dry Mouth

Diabetes-related Dry Mouth

Individuals suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes are at risk of developing dry mouth symptoms. Abnormal insulin production and/or absorption rates, which occur in diabetes, can cause the salivary glands to not release adequate amounts of saliva. According to experts, diabetes is likely the most frequent metabolic disease with salivary implications, due to the ever increasing numbers of people impacted by the disease. In 2016, there were more than 29 million people in the U.S. with diabetes, and 86 million with pre-diabetes, a serious health condition that increases one's risk of developing type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. Patients with dry mouth symptoms often have difficulty with many aspects of eating and swallowing. Denture wearers with diabetes may develop sores or have problems keeping dentures comfortably in place. In addition to dry mouth, many people with diabetes can experience taste disorders, excessive thirst, or a painful tongue. Facts and Stats Although research has shown that dry mouth symptoms are frequent among people with diabetes, most studies have not conclusively demonstrated that these rates are higher than in people without diabetes. This is not an exact science because there are many co-occurring health conditions that are contributing factors to developing dry mouth. Other factors that can cause salivary disorders in people with diabetes include advanced age, head and neck radiotherapy, systemic disorders, and several drugs. The following facts and stats are gathered from recent research. dry mouth symptoms associated with parotid gland enlargement affects nearly 25% of patients suffering from moderate to severe type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The parotid gland is the larger one of the two salivary glands, responsible for releasing sal Continue reading >>

Taste Disorders

Taste Disorders

Taste disorders facts* *Taste disorder facts by John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP The most common taste disorder is phantom taste perception, which is a lingering, often unpleasant taste even though you have nothing in your mouth. Another type of taste disorder is hypogeusia, a reduced ability to taste sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and savory (umami). Dysgeusia is a condition in which a foul, salty, rancid, or metallic taste sensation will persist in the mouth. Ageusia is the inability to detect any tastes, which is rare. Often, people who feel they have a problem with their sense of taste are experiencing a loss of smell instead of a loss of taste. Some people are born with taste disorders. Other causes include upper respiratory and middle ear infections, radiation therapy for cancers of the head and neck, exposure to certain chemicals, some antibiotics and antihistamines, head injury, surgery to the ear, nose, and throat, poor oral hygiene, and dental problems. Many types of taste disorders are curable when the underlying cause is diagnosed. If a medication is the cause, adjusting or changing the medication may help. If the taste disorder is due to an upper respiratory infection or allergy, once the condition is treated, the sense of taste returns to normal. Proper oral hygiene can also resolve some taste disorders. If you lose some or all of your sense of taste you can make your food taste better by preparing foods with a variety of textures, and using herbs and hot spices. How common are taste disorders? Many of us take our sense of taste for granted, but a taste disorder can have a negative effect on your health and quality of life. If you are having a problem with your sense of taste, you are not alone. More than 200,000 people visit a doctor each year for problems with the Continue reading >>

8 Possible Causes For That Metallic Taste In Your Mouth

8 Possible Causes For That Metallic Taste In Your Mouth

Does your mouth have the taste of old pennies? The condition is more common than you might think. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy A metallic taste can indicate serious illness, such as kidney or liver problems, undiagnosed diabetes or certain cancers . But these reasons are not common and usually are accompanied by other symptoms. If you are otherwise healthy, the cause for that metallic tang typically is benign, says family medicine physician Michael Rabovsky, MD . Dr. Rabovsky is Chairman of the Department of Family Medicine and the Vice Chairman of the Medicine Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. If a metallic taste in your mouth is your only complaint, the cause might be one of several, including prescription drugs or a medicalcondition. Here, according to Dr. Rabovsky, are eight causes of a metallic taste in your mouth. Poor oral hygiene If you dont brush and floss regularly, the resultcan beteeth and gum problems such as gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth infection.These infections can be cleared up with a prescription from your dentist. The metal taste typically goes away after the infection is gone. Prescription drugs These medicines include antibiotics such as tetracycline; the gout medicine allopurinol; lithium, which is used to treat certain psychiatric conditions; and some cardiac medications. Your body absorbs the medicine and it comes out in the saliva. Also, medicines that can cause a dry mouth, such as antidepressants, can be a culprit. These can affect your taste because they close your taste buds. Over-the-counter vitamins or medicines Multivitamins with heavy metals (such as copper, zinc or chromium) or cold Continue reading >>

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

Xerostomia is an ominous sounding name for a fairly common condition suffered by approximately 20% of the population, one that most people tend to underestimate, a dry mouth. In essence, having a dry mouth means the body is not producing enough saliva, which helps the mouth stay clean while removing harmful bacteria that can cause cavities and other painful infections in the mouth. Saliva neutralizes the acid in the mouth and is an important part of the digestive process as it provides the moisture needed to chew and swallow food. Dry Mouth Causes There are many causes of dry mouth, such as not drinking enough liquid during the day, smoking, and sleeping with your mouth open, among others. Dry mouth can also be caused by certain types of medication, such ADHD medicine, anti-histamines, antidepressants, sleep medications, and narcotics. When this is the case, the problem tends to disappear once the underlying cause is removed, meaning that a dry mouth is usually nothing more than a temporary problem with an easy fix. However, for individuals suffering from diabetes, having a dry mouth can be more than just a mild annoyance. Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes A dry mouth can exacerbate the side effects of diabetes, which will then lead to an increase in glucose levels, wreaking havoc on the body. A dry mouth is not only a symptom of high blood sugar, but it can also be the cause of it. Having a dry mouth, especially as a diabetic, can lead to rampant tooth decay, which means blood sugar increases as the body tries, and fails, to fight infection. A dry mouth can also lead to loss of sleep and an altered sense of taste, a condition that presents with a metallic or sour taste in the mouth. Treatments for Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes Because of the harmful effects of having a dry m Continue reading >>

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