diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Swollen Hand

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Is Swelling Related To High Blood Sugar?

Insulin is a hormone that transfers sugar from your blood to your cells. When you have insufficient amounts of insulin -- or your cells are resistant to insulin -- a you may develop high blood sugar. High blood sugar is the predominant characterization of diabetes, but it is also associated with people who have pre-diabetes. High blood sugar can lead to complications of diabetes that include conditions which involve swelling. Video of the Day Swelling, also called edema, is the enlargement of a body tissue, such as skin or an organ. A buildup of fluid in the tissue causes swelling to take place in a local area in several parts throughout your body and leads to rapid weight gain in a short period of time. Common parts of the body that can be affected include the feet, legs, gums, face, blood vessels, joints and glands. Swelling can occur when you eat too much sodium or take diabetes medications called thiazolidinediones. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes characterized by swelling of the lenses of your eyes that is caused by damage to your blood vessels from high levels of blood sugar. Initially, you may not know you have any problems and your eyesight may appear fine. Over time, though, excessive levels of blood sugar in the capillaries that nourish your retina can cause diabetic retinopathy and vision loss. In fact, the higher the levels of blood sugar, the more likely you will damage blood vessels and develop diabetic retinopathy. High blood sugar increases your risk of an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, conditions characterized by blockage of a blood vessel supplying the brain, or bleeding into or around the brain, respectively. High blood sugar can cause more swelling associated with a stroke. Research by scientists at the Seoul Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

6 Best Fixes For Pain And Swelling In Your Feet And Ankles

Have you ever looked down at yourankles and feet, first not recognizing them as your own, then, realizing they are swollen?Whether from long days on your feet, travel or surgery, it happens. For pregnant women, it isalmost inevitable. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Swelling in your ankles and feet isuncomfortable, and sometimes it keeps you from moving freely. But, there are several ways to relieve swelling from everyday causes and sometimes you can even prevent it, sayspodiatric physician and surgeon Georgeanne Botek, DPM ,Head of the Section of Podiatry and Medical Director of the Diabetic Foot Clinic at Cleveland Clinic. She saysswelling (or what doctors refer to as edema ) happens when your body retains fluid in the lower legs, ankles and feet. It most often occurs on both sides of the body, and its not an emergency situation. When it comes to swelling, its about management and getting through the day, she says. Theres nothing thats necessarily curative. RELATED: Lymphedema: What You Should Know About Your Risk, Treatment Options How to relieveswollen, painful feet and ankles You can often treat the symptoms of swelling that occurs on both sides of your body yourself, Dr. Botek says. Here are some ideas that can help: 1. Compression socks. Available at your local drug or grocery store, compression socks provide pain relief and prevent fluid collection in your legs, ankles and feet. They come in light, medium and heavy weights, so be sure you select a pair that isnt too tight for your body. Dr. Botek suggests starting with lightweight ones that measure between 12-15 mm or 15-20 mm of mercury. 2. Elevation. Prop your legs u Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Hands

Diabetes And Your Hands

Did you know that diabetes can hurt, stiffen, and even disable your shoulders, wrists, fingers, and other joints? None of these conditions is well understood. So how can you prevent them and deal with them? Of course, people without diabetes can have joint issues, but having diabetes raises your risk. All of these conditions seem to be related to thickening or stiffening of connective tissues — the ligaments and tendons that hold our bodies together. These tissues are mostly made of collagen, a protein that should have some give and flow to it, like a soft rubber ball. When collagen stiffens, joints start to hurt and don’t work as well. Here are four of the more well known diabetes-related joint conditions: Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition in which the range of motion of the shoulder joint is severely restricted. According to the American Diabetes Association, it affects 20% of people with diabetes and 5% of the general population. It usually starts with shoulder pain and inflammation and can progress to stiffness and near-complete immobility. Then it starts to resolve, and is usually gone within two years, especially with treatment. Diabetic stiff hand syndrome is a painless disorder caused by an increase in collagen in and just below the skin. It can sharply limit hand function. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a painful condition caused by pressure on the median nerve, which passes into the hand through a narrow “tunnel.” If this tunnel is squeezed by thickening of ligaments or other structures, severe pain can result. CTS is often associated with typing or other repetitive work that keep wrists in unnatural positions. Trigger finger is a condition where one or more fingers curl up and are difficult to straighten. The tendons Continue reading >>

Swollen Feet, Ankles And Hands - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Swollen Feet, Ankles And Hands - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Hello to everyone here. I am a type 1 diabetic (28) who was diagnosed when I was five years old. For the past three days, I have noticed that my ankles and feet, wrists and top of hands swelling considerably. On my feet and ankles the swelling is the worst. I can feel the skin tightening, and my ankles dissappear--they're still there...just buried under puffiness. I am a large but not terribly overweight person, just tall and Nordic (lol). I have seen some commentary about edema, kidney issues, and heart issues associated with this kind of swelling (God forbid it's any of those). I have never had this type of thing happen before (well, unless you count injuries from general clumsiness). My insulin usage has also skyrocketed for some reason. I check my blood sugar and take an active part in my health. My feet are in good condition--no injuries or discoloration, just nice and, er, plump, and rather uncomfortable. I can push my finger into my ankle and make a dent. Ick. Called the doctor...I go in for blood work on Monday (today being Friday)--he's great, but he is a general physician (no responsible endos in Greenville that I can see--that's another issue). Also, I have had hip problems resulting in big pain for about a year now. The swelling seems to happen when I am sitting down or when I am sleeping. What could this indicate? Please try not to be too frightening. I am so grateful that this site exists, and thanks for any help you can give. Oh--Lantus and Humalog are my meds along with Zestril 20mg. Continue reading >>

13 Reasons Your Feet Are Swollen

13 Reasons Your Feet Are Swollen

What Causes Swollen Feet You’ve got to hand it to your feet—they might just be the hardest-working part of your body. They take a beating every day, supporting your body weight and letting you walk, run, jump, stand, and tip-toe. The 26 bones and more than 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments in each foot and ankle work as a team, carrying you to your job, the gym, and home. All of this foot action adds up to a lot of wear and tear, so it isn’t a surprise that one of the biggest complaints people have is swollen feet. Feet often puff up a half-size or so because you’re not treating them with the TLC they deserve—say by standing all day or shoving them into too-tight pumps. But swollen feet have other causes too, some of which are serious and serve as red flags to a larger health issue. So what exactly happens when feet swell? Whether due to pressure, inactivity, injury, or some other cause, circulation to and from your feet slows down, and blood begins to pool in the many blood vessels spread out along your toes, heels, and ankles. Gravity helps this along too, says Dyane Tower, DPM, director of clinical affairs at the American Podiatric Medical Association. Tired of coming home with feet that feel like balloons and concerned about why they’re swollen? Our guide below covers every cause, then takes you through the next steps. You stand or sit for hours at a time Counter people, doctors, nurses, and others who work on their feet often end the day feeling like their shoes are too tight. Here’s why: when you don’t move much while standing, the muscles in your legs, ankles, your feet don’t have a chance to contract, causing blood flow to and from your feet to slow down. The same thing happens to people who sit for long stretches. Reduced blood flow triggers Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

People with diabetes can sometimes experience blisters on their skin. These are known as diabetic blisters, bullosis diabeticorum, or diabetic bullae. Although more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, diabetic blisters are relatively rare, affecting just 0.5 percent of those with the condition. The blisters typically occur in people with uncontrolled diabetes. They are painless and tend to heal on their own without the need for medical intervention. This article looks at the causes and symptoms of diabetic blisters and lists several ways to treat and prevent them. Contents of this article: Causes The exact cause of diabetic blisters is not known, but several factors are thought to play a role in blister development. The blisters may result from: wearing shoes that do not fit properly reduced circulation a fungal infection called Candida albicans other injury or irritation to the feet or hands Furthermore, certain people with diabetes are more at risk of developing diabetic blisters than others. People at risk of developing diabetic blisters include: people whose blood sugar levels are not under control people with sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light men, as research reveals men are twice as likely as women to have diabetic blisters Symptoms Diabetic blisters most commonly appear in people who have had uncontrolled diabetes for several years. In some cases, however, they may be the first indication of diabetes or even prediabetes. Blisters are usually clear bumps that typically appear on the legs, feet, and toes, as well as the arms, hands, and fingers. They may be: irregularly-shaped up to 6 inches across clustered or, less commonly, occurring as a single lesion filled with a clear fluid itchy The skin around diabetic blisters will usually look Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Woman With A Swollen Forearm

A Diabetic Woman With A Swollen Forearm

Go to: CASE REPORT A 58 year-old-woman with a three-week history of left upper forearm pain was admitted to our hospital. She noted a history of type II DM, which was diagnosed five months ago. She did not have any history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy. Her current condition began with a sudden onset of swelling and pain in the left forearm, extending to her fingers. Before this recent admission, several antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prescribed for her, with no improvement. On physical examination, she was afebrile with severe swelling and tenderness in her forearm. Ophthalmological examination was normal and no evidence of retinopathy or nephropathy was found. The white blood cell count was 17500 (normal, 4800–10800) with 80% neutrophils (normal, 33–75%). Fasting blood glucose was 235 mg/dl (normal, 70–105) and hemoglobin A1C was 6.5% (normal, < 6%). Other laboratory results were as follows: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) 17 mm/hour (normal, 0–25), creatine kinase (CK) 5930 U/L (normal, 25–175), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 780 U/L (normal, 0–480), aspartate transaminase 89 U/L (normal, < 31), and alanine transaminase 53 U/L (normal, < 31). Blood cultures were negative. Arterial and venous Doppler ultrasound of the left forearm was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse edema and abnormal low and high signal intensities in the soft tissues of the left forearm [Figure 1]. A diagnosis of DMI was made. The blood glucose was controlled by oral hypoglycemic agents. Her muscle enzymes were gradually decreased to 143 and 504 for creatine kinase (CK) and Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), respectively. She was discharged without any swelling or pain eight days later. On a follow-up visit after two months, sh Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

If you are diabetic, you need to worry about a lot more things like heart diseases and leg swelling. This causes peripheral edema in some cases and can be painful. If you see symptoms of swelling in your ankles, lower legs or feet, it is time to pay your physician an emergency visit. Diabetes expand blood circulation in an inappropriate way, which can cause swelling in the lower leg region. However, there could be other reasons as well that would cause the swelling. So a visit to the doctor is a must. Diabetes is a serious disease which gives rise to many further complications; swelling in the legs is one of them. Let’s discuss a few reasons that could be contributing to the swelling and its cure. What can lead to leg swelling? For any diabetic patient, it is a must to consult a doctor in case you notice any changes in the body. A patient who’s been living with diabetes for several years needs to be extra careful because this disease comes with so many attached risks. If you are diabetic and have noticed some leg swelling recently, the following could be a few reasons for it. The main reason for leg swelling in diabetes is peripheral edema. Fluids collect in the feet, ankles and leg and this condition can become quite severe if left untreated. A consultation with a doctor is a must. Sometimes, a diabetic may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that leads to numbness in legs and feet. As a result, the diabetic may not be able to feel an injury, maybe something even as severe as a sprain or a fracture and continue to use the limb. But the swelling caused by the injury is what will raise concern, which is why a consultation with the doctor becomes very important. Diabetics have low immunity towards infections and your swelling could very well be a sign Continue reading >>

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Swelling (edema) And Diabetes - Swelling In The Legs, Ankles And Feet

Tweet Edema (known as oedema in the UK) is a build up of fluid in the body (water retention) which causes swelling. Edema commonly affects the legs, ankles, feet and wrist. Water retention is often treatable, with treatment varying depending on the cause. Symptoms of edema The main symptom of edema is swelling of the affected area. Other symptoms that may occur, along with swelling, include: Weight gain Aching limbs Stiff joints Discolouration of skin Hypertension (high blood pressure) What causes swelling in the legs, feet and ankles? Swollen ankles and legs will often be brought on, or aggravated, by long periods of standing. A number of medications can increase the risk of oedema. Such medications include corticosteroids, blood pressure medications and the contraceptive pill. Water retention may also be caused by a number of conditions including: A high intake of salt can increase the problems of swelling in people with kidney disease. Treatment for edema Treatment for edema may vary depending on the cause. Water retention may be resolved if the underlying cause can be adequately treated. Regular physical activity and preventing long periods of standing can help reduce water retention. A low dietary salt intake is advisable, particularly if fluid retention has been brought on by kidney disease. If you are overweight, weight loss can help with reducing fluid retention. Diuretics, also known as ‘water tablets’, help to remove fluid from the body and may be prescribed for some causes of oedema. Prevention You can reduce your risk of edema by taking steps to prevent kidney disease and heart failure from developing. This can be achieved through good control of blood glucose levels, regular exercise and a healthy diet. If you can avoid long periods of standing, this wi Continue reading >>

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

7 Tips For Diabetics To Reduce Swelling In The Feet

Most patients suffering from diabetes complain of swelling in the feet and legs. The main reason for this problem is improper blood circulation due to damaged blood capillaries as a result of increased pressure. Damaged capillaries cause peripheral oedema, leakage of fluids into surrounding tissues, which causes swelling. But, there can be several other reasons that could cause swelling in the feet. Therefore proper diagnosis is important. Poor circulation is also one of the reasons why wounds in diabetic patients don’t heal quickly. Mr Bhushan Hemade of Diaped, a chain of multi-disciplinary foot clinics says ‘Foot problems are common in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious.’ They increases the risk of infections and severe complications like foot ulcers and gangrene that can even lead to limb amputation. That’s why, you should not ignore even minor swelling in your feet. In most cases, when the swelling has just started, simple lifestyle changes can reduce swelling and provide relief to a great extent. 1. Exercise regularly: Mr Hemade says ‘Regular exercise will improve bone and joint health in your feet and legs, improve circulation to your legs, and will also help to stabilize your blood sugar levels. But you should consult your doctor prior to beginning any exercise program.’ Do not practice rigorous exercises as it can lead to exercise-induced oedema. 2. Elevate your legs: Elevation of feet (above the heart level) using a support or a pillow for 10-15 minutes every day can help to reduce swelling. Elevation drains out excess fluid from the surrounding tissues and improves circulation. 3. Use compression stockings and bandages: Compression products are now widely available for foot care in diabetics. They exert pressure on the affected are Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes And Your Joints

Diabetes can cause changes in your musculoskeletal system, which is the term for your muscles, bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons. These changes can cause numerous conditions that may affect your fingers, hands, wrists, shoulders, neck, spine, or feet. Symptoms of diabetes-related musculoskeletal problems include muscle pain, joint pain or stiffness, lessened ability to move your joints, joint swelling, deformities, and a “pins and needles” sensation in the arms or legs. Some musculoskeletal problems are unique to diabetes. Others also affect people without diabetes. For instance, diabetes can cause skin changes such as thickening, tightness, or nodules under the skin, particularly in the hands. Carpal tunnel syndrome is frequently seen in people with diabetes, as is trigger finger (a catching or locking of the fingers), although these conditions are commonly seen in people without diabetes, as well. The shoulder joint may also be affected in diabetes. And, of course, the feet are susceptible to problems caused by diabetes. Most of these conditions can be successfully treated with anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, or other therapies. It is important to mention any troubling symptoms to your doctor. Ask yourself the following questions, which address some of the more frequent symptoms people have when diabetes affects their muscles, ligaments, tendons, or joints. If you answer “yes” to any, consult your doctor. • Do you have stiffness in your hands that affects your ability to move or use them? • Do your fingers get “locked” in certain positions? • Do you have numbness or tingling in your hands, arms, or legs? • Do you have stiffness or decreased motion in your shoulders? • Do you have muscle pain or swelling? View Abstract Edito Continue reading >>

More in diabetes