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Diabetes Sweating Face

9 Things Your Sweat Is Trying To Tell You

9 Things Your Sweat Is Trying To Tell You

No one likes when her face is too damp to apply makeup on summer mornings or when it seems like every white shirt you own is permanently discolored, but sweat is actually the body's (pretty brilliant) built-in cooling system. Your body temperature rises, your nervous system gives your sweat glands the green light, and moisture pops onto your skin, where it promptly (well, eventually) evaporates, cooling you down in the process. (Not feeling as well as you used to? Learn how to heal your body—and lose up to 13 pounds in just 2 weeks—with Prevention's 12-day liver detox!) And yet, we're constantly at battle with our sweat: trying to make it stink less, trying to stop it altogether during an important meeting, then trying to lose buckets of it at the gym. But if you stop and pay attention, all that perspiration can actually teach you a surprising amount about yourself and your health. Here are a few things it's trying to tell you. Anything that toys with your endocrine system (your body's collection of hormone-producing glands) can leave you feeling sweatier than usual. Of course, there’s the dreaded hot flash, which as many as 85% of women have in the years right around menopause, but pregnancy may also be to blame. That's because hormonal changes seem to mess with the brain’s "thermostat," mistakenly making you think you’re overheating—and triggering the naturally cooling sweat response—even when you’ve positioned yourself right in front of the AC. (If menopause is the case, here are 8 ways to make it a little less miserable.) If you keep catching yourself sniffing and wondering, "Is that me?!", take a sec to reflect on what's been on your mind lately. If you're stressed or anxious, your pits are probably to blame. The sweat we produce when we’re hot is Continue reading >>

Is Your Excessive Sweating Caused By A Medical Problem?

Is Your Excessive Sweating Caused By A Medical Problem?

Do you sweat more than other people? Does a five-minute workout on the treadmill leave you sopping wet? Do you wipe your hand before every handshake? At the very least, excessive sweating is a hassle. But sometimes heavy sweating is sign of a medical condition. "It's not always easy for the average person to know the difference," says Benjamin Barankin, MD, a dermatologist in Toronto and a member of the American Academy of Dermatology. Excessive sweating, or hyperhidrosis, can be a warning sign of thyroid problems, diabetes or infection. Excessive sweating is also more common in people who are overweight or out of shape. The good news is that most cases of excessive sweating are harmless. If you are worried about how much you sweat, here's information to help you decide if you should see a doctor for a medical diagnosis. What Is Excessive Sweating? If you just sweat more than other people when it's hot or you're exerting yourself, that's not usually a sign of trouble. Sweating is a normal reaction when your body's working harder and needs to cool itself down. "There are natural variations in how people sweat, just as there are variations in other bodily functions," says Dee Anna Glaser, MD, vice chair of the dermatology department at St. Louis University and president of the International Hyperhidrosis Society. "Some people start sweating more easily than others." True excessive sweating goes beyond the normal physical need to sweat. If you have hyperhidrosis, you may sweat heavily for no reason -- when it's not appropriate to the circumstances. "Let's say that the temperature is mild, and you're not anxious, and you don't have a fever, and you're just watching a movie with your family," says Glaser. "If you're sitting there sweating profusely, that's not normal." Baran Continue reading >>

7 Reasons Why You Might Be Sweating A Lot

7 Reasons Why You Might Be Sweating A Lot

Though perspiration may sometimes seem like an evil trick perpetrated by an uncaring universe (especially when you're wearing a white shirt in the summertime), there are reasons why we sweat, and they go far beyond just helping us look shiny and vaguely burnished after 100 reps in the gym. Perspiration is a function of a complicated bodily system involving metabolism, temperature regulation, hormonal levels, blood flow on the skin and various other factors. It can also be triggered by medical or emotional issues (so, yes, you're not the only one; other people get the sweats when they're embarrassed, too). So far, so unpleasant-but-normal; but what's happening inside your body when it starts producing sweat at levels that seem excessive? Excessive perspiration can manifest itself in several forms, and make you really understand how many sweat glands are on your body (unfortunately). Depending on the sweating symptoms, excess perspiration can be caused by anything from low blood sugar to pregnancy to thyroid issues to medication. It's important to realize that dealing with excessive sweating is not just a matter of cooling yourself down; perspiration is a complicated thing, and many different bodily conditions can throw it out of whack. You're not just producing a new natural lake under your armpits for the fun of it; with some medical investigation, you may be able to pinpoint a cause of your excessive sweating and possibly even treat it. Do a bit of investigation (where do you sweat from? When does it tend to occur? What emotional or physical events happen beforehand? What other symptoms accompany it?) and keep those facts in mind while we explore some reasons why you might be extremely sweaty on the regular. Detective hats on, hand-towels at the ready. 1. Primary Focal Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Makes You Sweat Excessively

Why Diabetes Makes You Sweat Excessively

Excessive sweating is a common concern of diabetics, especially the patients of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar). According to American Diabetes Association, diabetics have several bouts of excessive sweating no matter how well you are managing your diabetes. Excessive sweating is more common in diabetics who are overweight. Nerve Damage – The progression of diabetes over time can damage the autonomic nervous system. It is quite rare but it may impact heart rate, blood pressure, perspiration and digestion. Owing to this, diabetes is often regarded as the causes for autonomic neuropathy. In most cases, nerve damage causes pain while in other cases the body functions get interrupted. Fluctuations in Blood Sugar Levels – Despite administration of diabetes, a patient could have blood sugar fluctuations from high to low and low to high. Disorder Treatments –The conditions such as hypoglycaemia should be treated as soon as identified. Any delay in treatment for medical conditions such as nerve damage could make blood glucose levels go out of control. Treatments for hypoglycaemia or autonomic neuropathy may result in complications such as excessive sweating. When to Seek Help for Excessive Sweating Frequent Night Sweats – When you are having have trouble sleeping due to cold sweat in night too often. Generalized sweating – When sweating does not confine to head, face, underarms and groin, but wholethe body. Asymmetrical sweating – Unusual sweating such as sweating in one armpit is another indication which indicates the need to seek help. Change in sweating pattern – Sudden sweating or infrequent sweating, which may be due to some specific food. Treatment for Excessive Sweating Antiperspirants – Available in the form of over-the-counter or prescription sprays and Continue reading >>

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a very serious condition, with extreme cases causing seizures, coma, and even death. It occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low, and it is most often experienced by people with diabetes. As you learn about diabetes management, being well versed in low blood sugar symptoms will enable you to detect the signs of impending hypoglycemia and act quickly to head it off or minimize its impact. Diabetes Type and Hypoglycemia Risk Hypoglycemia risk varies across the three different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia most often, as their diabetes management often requires a lot of attention and careful planning. The average person with type 1 diabetes who is attempting aggressive disease control may still experience low blood sugar symptoms frequently, and a full-blown case of hypoglycemia will require close medical attention. "When it comes to type 1 diabetes, the body can't make insulin on its own, so it must be administered," notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, Everyday Health contributor and author of Belly Fat for Dummies. Paying close attention to your diet is important, too. "If the correct amount of insulin is given based on the amount of carbohydrates consumed, blood sugar levels can remain in a healthy range." Type 2 Diabetes These patients experience hypoglycemia less frequently than people with type 1 diabetes; the rate of hypoglycemia for type 2 diabetes patients taking insulin is about one-third that of type 1 diabetes patients. But research shows that the frequency of hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes increases as the disease becomes more advanced. "In people with type 2 diabetes, the body may produce adequate insulin, yet the cells are resistant to it, making the insulin ineffecti Continue reading >>

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

Unless the weather is sweltering or you’re having hot flashes, excessive sweating is most likely an indication of a greater health issue. Ask yourself: Do you have a fever or other signs of an infection? Are you in any pain when you sweat? Is the sweating mainly on one side? Does it involve your palms, soles, and/or armpits? Do you sweat while you sleep? Is your blood glucose level high (or low) during these sweating episodes? Could sweating be a reaction to your diabetes medication? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. What are the possible causes of excessive sweating? For people with diabetes, certain complications can affect the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to cool down in hot weather, triggering heavy sweating even during light activities, or causing sweating in cool temperatures. 1. Autonomic neuropathy. This is a condition in which hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) interferes with the nerves that control involuntary functions. The autonomic nervous system manages several systems automatically, including bladder control, heart rate, the ability to detect hypoglycemia, and the ability to sweat appropriately. Dry feet are a common symptom of nerve disease, so it is important to inspect your feet daily to be sure there are no cracks from excessive dryness, a condition that tends to occur along with sweating. 2. Low blood glucose levels. A low blood glucose level is called hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia triggers a fight-or-flight response in the body. As a result, the body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline, which can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. Good diabetes management can help keep your blood glucose levels in check. 3. Heart problems. People with diabetes have Continue reading >>

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is a condition characterized by abnormally increased sweating,[3] in excess of that required for regulation of body temperature.[4] Although primarily a physical burden, hyperhidrosis can deteriorate quality of life from a psychological, emotional, and social perspective.[5] It has been called by some 'the silent handicap'.[6] Both the words diaphoresis and hidrosis can mean either perspiration (in which sense they are synonymous with sweating[7][8]) or excessive perspiration, in which case they refer to a specific, narrowly defined, clinical disorder. Classification[edit] Hyperhidrosis can either be generalized, or localized to specific parts of the body. Hands, feet, armpits, groin, and the facial area are among the most active regions of perspiration due to the high number of sweat glands (eccrine glands in particular) in these areas. When excessive sweating is localized (e.g. palms, soles, face, underarms, scalp) it is referred to as primary hyperhidrosis or focal hyperhidrosis. Excessive sweating involving the whole body is termed generalized hyperhidrosis or secondary hyperhidrosis. It is usually the result of some other, underlying condition. Primary or focal hyperhidrosis may be further divided by the area affected, for instance palmoplantar hyperhidrosis (symptomatic sweating of only the hands or feet) or gustatory hyperhidrosis (sweating of the face or chest a few moments after eating certain foods).[3] Hyperhidrosis can also be classified by onset, either congenital (present at birth) or acquired (beginning later in life). Primary or focal hyperhidrosis usually starts during adolescence or even earlier and seems to be inherited as an autosomal dominant genetic trait. It must be distinguished from secondary hyperhidrosis, which can start at any p Continue reading >>

Night Sweats In Men: Causes, Treatments And Remedies

Night Sweats In Men: Causes, Treatments And Remedies

Are you a man in your 20s, 30s, above 40, 50, 60 or 70 years old who occasionally or constantly suffer from severe and heavy night sweats? We have all the possible reasons or causes including hot flashes such as cancer, alcoholism, stress (anxiety), surgery, diabetes, infections, among others. We also have ways to treat or stop them and much more. Overview Night sweats or nocturnal hyperhidrosis in men, women or even children refers to the excessive sweating while someone is sleeping at night. Some texts often refer them to as ‘sweating in bed’ or ‘sleep sweat.’ This definition might not include it happening because they sleeping in very warm rooms, have very warm bedding or you wear many bedclothes since they will be expected to sweat and this is very normal. Actual night sweats can be described as ‘very severe hot flushes’ or ‘drenching ’ where victims have ‘heavy sweating while sleeping’ and they wake up with their clothes and bed sheets drenched. The cause of this severe or excessive sweating is not influenced by their environment. Whereas some people might have this problem occasionally, others will suffer from excessive, heavy or severe night sweats constantly until the underlying cause is correctly diagnosed and cured or prevented. In terms of their effects, although very unpleasant, they are harmless in most cases. They only serve to indicate or are symptoms of something totally wrong with your body. Due to their similarity to hot flushes (feverish heat that comes all over a sudden), it is not easy to say if they are just hot flashes or they could be night sweats. Cold sweat including those at night This is “the body's reaction to stress as part of the "fight or flight" response that helps us to react in a dangerous situation.” It happens Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

Facial Sweating After Food: A New Sign Of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

Facial Sweating After Food: A New Sign Of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

Facial sweating during eating (gustatory sweating) has been observed for the first time in a group of diabetics, and is considered to be a feature of the autonomic neuropathy which affected them all. The sweating, which was sometimes very severe, was produced by many foodstuffs, cheese being the most powerful stimulus. Atropine inhibited sweating stimulated by eating cheese, and oral anticholinergic drugs effectively eliminated the symptoms. These bizarre symptoms are probably due to abnormal nerve regeneration occurring as a consequence of the spontaneous autonomic neuropathy. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (1.4M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References. Images in this article FIG. 1 on p.584 FIG. 2 on p.585 These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes and Excessive Sweating While many people can experience difficulties with sweating, it can also be an issue for people with diabetes. There are three main types of sweating that you may experience. They are: hyperhidrosis: excessive sweating not caused by temperature or exercise gustatory sweating: caused by food and limited to face and neck areas night sweats: caused by low blood glucose during the night Each of these have different types of treatments. Your doctor can recommend the best treatment to help relieve or stop your excessive sweating. However, since sweating can be a sign of other more serious conditions, you should always talk to your doctor if you experience this type of sweating. Hyperhidrosis Hyperhidrosis is the term for excessive sweating. This is sweating that is not from exercising or the temperature. This can occur when your blood glucose gets too low (hypoglycemia). It will trigger a fight or flight response from your body. You produce excess adrenaline and norepinephrine, which cause excess sweating. Once your blood sugar returns to normal, the sweating should stop. If, along with sweating, you have bladder control problems or an unusual heart rate, it could indicate autonomic neuropathy. This is caused by damage to the nerves that control functions like the bladder, blood pressure, and sweating. Excessive sweating can also occur with obesity. Obesity often accompanies diabetes. However, these are not the only ways diabetes and excessive sweating can be connected. Gustatory Sweating Gustatory sweating is different than hyperhidrosis. It is also not unique to people with diabetes. However, people with diabetic autonomic neuropathy are more likely to experience this than those without nerve damage. Luckily, it is easy to identify. If you br Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Gustatory Sweating (frey's Syndrome)

Gustatory Sweating (frey's Syndrome)

It's not uncommon to sweat when you eat hot or spicy foods. It just makes sense... if eating or drinking a specific food raises your body temperature, then your body will try to cool itself with sweating. But some people sweat when they eat any kind of food (even ice cream) and some people sweat when they just think about food. Often called gustatory sweating or gustatory hyperhidrosis (and sometimes called Frey's syndrome), this food-related sweating can be extremely embarrassing and uncomfortable. Imagine yourself sweating excessively on your face and neck at a fancy restaurant while on a dinner date, or sweating as you wait for a business lunch to be served... Fortunately, treatment for gustatory sweating is possible, so don't throw away your Zagat's restaurant guide yet! Many cases of gustatory sweating show up after surgery or trauma to a parotid gland. Most people have a pair of parotid glands, one located on each side of the face, below and in front of the external ear. The parotid glands are the body's largest salivary glands. Saliva, as you probably know, is a fluid secreted by salivary glands to aid chewing, swallowing, and digestion of food. Saliva is produced in preparation for eating (like when you are thinking about a delicious meal) as well as during chewing. If a parotid gland is damaged or if surgery to a parotid is required (damage can occur due to inflammation, infection, and mumps, and tumors can require surgery), then related nerves may become damaged or may regenerate from such damage in a way that causes them to become "mixed up" and/or "intertwined" (so to speak). The result is that when a person is supposed to salivate, he or she may also sweat and experience facial flushing. This combination of sweating and flushing related to parotid trauma is Continue reading >>

Nephron 1995;69:337

Nephron 1995;69:337

Letter to the Editor Nephron 1995;69:337 Gustatory Sweating in a Diabetic End-Stage Renal Disease Patient Maintained on Hemodialysis A.A. Ahsan Ejaz R.I. Raja I. Zabaneh S.S. Subhash S. Popli T.S. Todd S. Ing D.J. David J. Leehey Departments of Medicine of Veterans Affairs Hospital, Hines, Ill. Loyola University Switch School of Medicine, Maywood, Ill., USA David J. Leehey, MD, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Hines, 111 60141 (USA) Dear Sir, Gustatory sweating is an unusual manifestation of abnormal nerve regeneration as a consequence of autonomic neuropathy that was recognized as early as the 18th century by Claude Bernard [1]. It has since been reported in patients suffering from Frey’s syndrome (auriculotemporal syndrome), most commonly after head and neck surgery [2]. Gustatory sweating may also occur in association with tic douloureux, cerebellopontine angle meningioma, herpes zoster, metastatic carcinoma, and diabetes mellitus [3-5]. We herein report a diabetic hemodialysis patient suffering from this sweating abnormality. Consideration of this entity in the diabetic patient population is necessary in order to avoid misdiagnosing the manifestation as being due to hypoglycemia, hypotension, or other causes. A 52-year-old white male with a 30-year history of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and diabetic end-stage renal disease had been maintained on hemodialysis for 3 years. The patient’s diabetic condition has been complicated in the past by retinopathy, ente-ropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and right oph-thalmoplegia. He was noted to have occasional episodes of facial and upper body sweating during dialysis. These symptoms were initially thought to be secondary to dialysis-related hypotensive episodes or hypoglycemia. However, blood pressure and plasma Continue reading >>

Profuse Head Sweating Causes

Profuse Head Sweating Causes

profuse sweating from head Excessive head sweating or facial sweating is perhaps the hardest sweating problem one would encounter. It is very difficult to hide as the sweat drips down the face, neck and scalp. People with this condition are much more prone to have excessive sweating in underarms, hands and/or feet. About 3 to 4 million people in the United States alone are suffering from this condition. profuse sweating from head | Young and old people encounter this complex phenomenon. Regardless of age, there are three main causes found to be common in people who have excessive head sweating. profuse sweating from head | There are many health problems examined and identified to be underlying reasons for the above mentioned condition, and a few of them are: 1. Obesity – too much unhealthy body fats slow down proper metabolism. 2. Anxiety disorder – stress causes increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system triggering overproduction of sweat glands. AdChoices 3. Thyroid disease – this causes an individual to have increased internal body temperature that results to hyperactive sweat glands. 4. Pheochromocytoma – a tumor of the adrenal glands can result to excessive sweating. 5. Other illnesses include high blood pressure, heart conditions and diabetes. profuse sweating from head | Hormonal imbalance is another cause for severe sweating. Menopause and puberty are two common examples wherein the hormones of an individual change its course. For the former condition, older men and women may experience hot flashes which can periodically cause excessive perspiration. The latter is experienced by children aged about 12 to 14. Hereditary or genetic predispositions are also found to cause such problem. There are some individuals who may have been born with an over Continue reading >>

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