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Diabetes Sweating After Eating

I Sweat Sometimes During Or After I Eat A Meal. Do I Need To Go See A Doctor? Could This Be Something Serious?

I Sweat Sometimes During Or After I Eat A Meal. Do I Need To Go See A Doctor? Could This Be Something Serious?

I sweat sometimes during or after I eat a meal. Do I need to go see a doctor? Could this be something serious? Scott Myers, M.D., is an associate professor of medicine in the division of gastroenterology & hepatology at Drexel University College of Medicine. In general, sweating may be a response to many factors such as vigorous exercise, fever, medications, diabetes or medical conditions involving the thyroid gland, nervous system or other bodily processes. In and of itself, it is not always a problem, but may indicate an underlying medical condition. A more common cause of sweating during or after meals is the result of eating spicy foods such as peppers. If one does ingest a lot of spicy foods this could lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is also known as heartburn. People with GERD feel a burning sensation travelling from their chest moving towards their mouth. They may also have regurgitation or a sour taste. This is important to know as untreated GERD can potentially lead to difficulty swallowing or precancerous changes of the swallowing tube (esophagus). It is important to discuss your symptoms with your primary care physician. If, in fact, you also have symptoms of GERD you should consider seeing a gastroenterologist for further evaluation and recommendations. Frey’s Syndrome and diabetic gustatory sweating are also possibilities, but very unlikely. Talk to your physician if you suspect you may have those conditions. To check out more Check Up items go to www.philly.com/checkup Continue reading >>

Nephron 1995;69:337

Nephron 1995;69:337

Letter to the Editor Nephron 1995;69:337 Gustatory Sweating in a Diabetic End-Stage Renal Disease Patient Maintained on Hemodialysis A.A. Ahsan Ejaz R.I. Raja I. Zabaneh S.S. Subhash S. Popli T.S. Todd S. Ing D.J. David J. Leehey Departments of Medicine of Veterans Affairs Hospital, Hines, Ill. Loyola University Switch School of Medicine, Maywood, Ill., USA David J. Leehey, MD, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Hines, 111 60141 (USA) Dear Sir, Gustatory sweating is an unusual manifestation of abnormal nerve regeneration as a consequence of autonomic neuropathy that was recognized as early as the 18th century by Claude Bernard [1]. It has since been reported in patients suffering from Frey’s syndrome (auriculotemporal syndrome), most commonly after head and neck surgery [2]. Gustatory sweating may also occur in association with tic douloureux, cerebellopontine angle meningioma, herpes zoster, metastatic carcinoma, and diabetes mellitus [3-5]. We herein report a diabetic hemodialysis patient suffering from this sweating abnormality. Consideration of this entity in the diabetic patient population is necessary in order to avoid misdiagnosing the manifestation as being due to hypoglycemia, hypotension, or other causes. A 52-year-old white male with a 30-year history of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and diabetic end-stage renal disease had been maintained on hemodialysis for 3 years. The patient’s diabetic condition has been complicated in the past by retinopathy, ente-ropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and right oph-thalmoplegia. He was noted to have occasional episodes of facial and upper body sweating during dialysis. These symptoms were initially thought to be secondary to dialysis-related hypotensive episodes or hypoglycemia. However, blood pressure and plasma Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

GENERAL INFORMATION: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During this Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Why a Short List Is Not Enough Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of using insulin, and it can also occur in people who take pills that cause the pancreas to release more insulin. Pills that have this effect include the oral drugs chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, and Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), glimepiride (Amaryl), combination drugs that contain glyburide, glipizide, or glimepiride (such as Glucovance, Metaglip, Avandaryl, and Duetact), repaglinide (Prandin), combination drugs that contain repaglinide (Prandimet), and nateglinide (Starlix). It is therefore important that anyone who uses one of these drugs know what causes hypoglycemia, how to prevent it, how to recognize it, and how to treat it. Often, however, the most education a person receives on the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia is a handout listing its 10 most common symptoms. This is particularly true for adults. But, as any longtime user of insulin will tell you, such a list does not go far enough in describing how those common symptoms can feel, and it misses some important, albeit not-so-common, symptoms of hypoglycemia. This article attempts to fill in some of the blanks by describing what those common symptoms really feel like — in a variety of situations, including driving and sleeping — and by describing some less common symptoms. Once you (and your friends, coworkers, and family members) are better equipped to recognize hypoglycemia, you will be able treat low blood glucose faster and avert more severe hypoglycemia and its sometimes serious consequences. What is hypoglycemia Low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes

Hypoglycaemia is a condition where the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood drops below a certain point – usually around 4.0mmol/l. This causes a number of symptoms such as dizziness, sweating, shaking and palpitations, that usually go away 10 to 15 minutes after eating sugar. Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas and helps the body's cells absorb glucose from the blood: After a meal the glucose level rises to about 7 to 10mmol/l. One to two hours later, the glucose level starts dropping again. By the next meal, the glucose level is back to normal: about 4 to 5mmol/l. The insulin level in the blood has also returned to normal. Hypoglycaemic episodes (hypos) can be caused by: over-treatment – the dose of insulin or diabetes tablets is set too high or you accidentally take too much mismatched calorie intake versus demand – this happens when your body needs energy but can't get it from your calorie intake, for example if you eat less than usual or exercise more alcohol – alcoholic drinks tend to lower the blood sugar. What happens during a hypo? It is expressed as millimoles per litre (mmol/l). You can experience some or all of the following symptoms: paleness shaking perspiration a feeling of weakness rapid heartbeat hunger agitation difficulty concentrating irritability blurred vision temporary loss of consciousness confusion convulsions coma. A 'hypo' is the short name given to episodes of low blood sugar. Most people do get some warning that hypoglycaemia is happening. But for some, hypoglycaemia may cause few or none of the warning symptoms before the start of sudden unconsciousness or convulsions – particularly if you've had diabetes for many years. This condition is called 'hypoglycaemia unawareness'. The aim of diabetes treatment is to have as nea Continue reading >>

Why Does Eating Make Me Sweat?

Why Does Eating Make Me Sweat?

The type of food-related perspiration you describe is called “gustatory sweating,” meaning perspiring pertaining to taste or tasting. With this problem, you can start to perspire while you’re eating and, sometimes, even when you’re just thinking about food. The sweat usually breaks out on the face, hairline and neck and can be profuse. Some cases of gustatory sweating are due to surgical or other injury to a parotid gland, or more specifically, to the auriculotemporal nerve that controls saliva production by the parotids. There are two of these glands, one behind each cheek. Approximately 24 percent of patients who have surgery to remove a parotid gland experience gustatory sweating afterward. If a nerve injury is the cause of the sweating, you’ll experience perspiration on just one side of the face. With the parotid gland gone, the nerve attaches itself to sweat glands, with the result that instead of salivating when you eat or even think of food, you begin to sweat. The name for this particular injury and the sweating it leads to is Frey’s Syndrome, after the Polish physician who first described it, Lucja Frey-Gottesman, one of the first female academic neurologists in Europe. The type of foods you eat can also cause you to break out in a sweat. This is most likely to happen with hot and spicy meals, but even hot soup or hot tea can turn on the sweat. Here, the explanation for the perspiration is clear; the hot foods raise your body temperature enough to set off your body’s cooling mechanism, otherwise known as perspiration. This reaction can also be associated with diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, cluster headache, or shingles. If one of these medical conditions is responsible, the sweating usually occurs on both sides of the face, temples, forehead, ch Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes After Eating Or Drinking: Causes And Treatment Tips

Hot Flashes After Eating Or Drinking: Causes And Treatment Tips

If you have ever had hot flashes after eating or drinking, you are not alone. This is something that many people experience yet may not fully understand, especially when it comes to the cause. Here we take a look at what getting hot flashes after eating could mean and how to get rid of them. Hot flashes are usually caused by a hormonal imbalance and are common when a woman goes through menopause. In fact, studies show that three out of four menopausal women experience hot flashes. Some people have menopause hot flashes after eating while others have hot flashes related to endocrinal disorders. The most common condition associated with this is diabetes. The problem with hot flashes is that they can be uncomfortable and in some cases, embarrassing. The embarrassment is usually a result of the sweating that a person just can’t control. What does a hot flash feel like? For those who have not experienced sweating after eating or hot flashes during menopause, it can be hard to imagine. While the symptoms do vary from person to person, they typically include a sudden sensation of heat and flushing followed by perspiration. Other signs include trembling, confusion, and general weakness. What causes hot flashes after eating? Sweating after eating a meal has been the subject of much research, yet the exact cause is still a mystery. We do know that hot flashes occur when estrogen decreases in the female body. You could say that this disrupts a woman’s internal thermostat. This is a phenomenon associated with menopause. Certain foods and drink or even eating a large meal can also bring on hot flashes. For instance, hot flashes after eating spicy food are not unusual. Caffeine and alcohol are also known to cause hot flashes. The heat sensation normally occurs in healthy adults o Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Excessive Sweating After Eating Or Drinking?

What Are The Causes Of Excessive Sweating After Eating Or Drinking?

Sweating after eating or drinking may affect many of us; however in some cases it can be indicative of a serious underlying metabolic disorder. The severity of sweating may differ in different individuals which may range from nominal to profuse sweating on either sides of the face, chest and neck. While the treatment of the condition depends upon the cause, it is important to consult your physician, if the condition is not manageable by simple home remedies or is associated with other systemic symptoms. Sweating is a natural phenomenon and sweating usually happens in response to body’s attempt to cool down. The skin comprises of sweat glands, which release sweat. Sweat uses body heat to evaporate and thereby aids in cooling down the body. Profuse sweating can be observed especially in hot summer weathers, when the body needs to naturally control its temperature. Sweating after eating and drinking is also a common phenomenon. In most cases sweating affects the entire body with varying degree of severity. Causes Of Sweating After Eating Or Drinking? There are a host of factors that can lead to sweating after eating. Some of the more commonly known causes include, Consumption of spicy and salty foods like pickles or vinegar can lead to sweating after eating. Consumption of alcohol can also trigger sweating after eating. Excessive sweating after eating is linked with poorly controlled blood sugar levels, especially in diabetic individuals. As per a study published in Diabetic Medicine, gustatory sweating is linked with kidney damage or nephropathy in about 69 % of diabetics and with nerve damage or neuropathy in about 36% of diabetics. Sweating after eating or drinking can also be linked to hormonal changes in the body as experienced during menopause or andropause. Heat f Continue reading >>

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

Unless the weather is sweltering or you’re having hot flashes, excessive sweating is most likely an indication of a greater health issue. Ask yourself: Do you have a fever or other signs of an infection? Are you in any pain when you sweat? Is the sweating mainly on one side? Does it involve your palms, soles, and/or armpits? Do you sweat while you sleep? Is your blood glucose level high (or low) during these sweating episodes? Could sweating be a reaction to your diabetes medication? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. What are the possible causes of excessive sweating? For people with diabetes, certain complications can affect the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to cool down in hot weather, triggering heavy sweating even during light activities, or causing sweating in cool temperatures. 1. Autonomic neuropathy. This is a condition in which hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) interferes with the nerves that control involuntary functions. The autonomic nervous system manages several systems automatically, including bladder control, heart rate, the ability to detect hypoglycemia, and the ability to sweat appropriately. Dry feet are a common symptom of nerve disease, so it is important to inspect your feet daily to be sure there are no cracks from excessive dryness, a condition that tends to occur along with sweating. 2. Low blood glucose levels. A low blood glucose level is called hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia triggers a fight-or-flight response in the body. As a result, the body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline, which can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. Good diabetes management can help keep your blood glucose levels in check. 3. Heart problems. People with diabetes have Continue reading >>

Sweating In Diabetes

Sweating In Diabetes

It was hot in the Peruvian rainforest – over 40°C. We walked for hours looking for wildlife. That evening my clothes were wringing wet with sweat – and the macaws had eaten my soap. Sweating cools our bodies. Adrenaline release causes sweating too. Most sweat is excreted from eccrine glands throughout the skin, especially on the palms, soles, and head. Sweat contains mainly water and sodium chloride, with potassium, bicarbonate, and trace components including glucose. Most of the sodium chloride is reabsorbed. Apocrine sweat glands, mainly in the axillae and anogenital area, excrete sweat containing lipids, proteins and steroids, mixed with sebum. Sweat is odourless but the action of skin bacteria makes it smell, particularly the oily apocrine sweat which may act as a pheromone. Cystic fibrosis Cystic fibrosis affects over 10 000 people in the UK and is recessively inherited. Accumulated thick, sticky mucus impairs lung function and invites infection, causes malabsorption by impairing pancreatic digestive enzyme release, and leads to liver disease. About a third of people with cystic fibrosis develop diabetes. The median survival of 40 years in cystic fibrosis is reduced by having diabetes.1 Cystic fibrosis increases chloride excretion in sweat – so diagnosis is by sweat testing.2 Increased sweating in diabetes Hypoglycaemia Sweating is a cardinal symptom of hypoglycaemia, due to adrenaline release as part of the counter-regulatory hormonal response to the low glucose. It is an autonomic symptom mediated by cholinergic sympathetic nerve fibres.3 A meta-analysis found that 47–84% of people with diabetes experienced sweating when they were hypoglycaemic.4 People with diabetes should learn their own early warning symptoms of hypoglycaemia. Gustatory sweating ‘I Continue reading >>

Diabetic Gustatory Sweating

Diabetic Gustatory Sweating

Abstract The term "gustatory sweating" refers to sweating induced by the ingestion of food. Facial sweating is a physiologic response to eating highly spiced food (1). In some persons facial sweating occurs as an idiosyncratic response to specific types of food; cheese is frequently a stimulant to sweating in susceptible persons (2). In contrast to physiologic gustatory sweating, which is diffuse and symmetrical (1), circumscribed gustatory sweating may develop after abscess, trauma, or surgery of the parotid gland, in which case it is known as Frey's syndrome (3). In 1973 Watkins (4) described the cases of six patients in whom diffuse Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

"Gastro" means stomach and "paresis" means impairment or paralysis. Diabetic gastropathy is a term for the spectrum of neuromuscular abnormalities of the stomach caused by diabetes. The abnormalities include gastric-dysrhythmias, antral hypomotility, incoordination of antroduodenal contractions and gastroparesis. Quick Stomach Anatomy Lesson The stomach is a neuromusclar organ that receives the food we ingest, mixes the food with acid and pepsin, and empties the nutriment suspension into the small intestine for absorption. The proximal stomach or fundus relaxes in order to receive the swallowed food (that's called receptive relaxation). The body and antrum mix and empty the food via recurrent gastric peristalic waves. The peristaltic contractions are paced by neoelectrical events called pacesetter potentials or slow waves. When gastric motility is normal, the postprandial (after eating) period is associated with pleasant epigastric sensations. Gastric motility disorders or gastroparesis presents with unpleasant, but non-specific postprandial symptoms: upper abdominal bloating, distention, discomfort, early satiety, nausea, and vomiting. If the vomitus contains undigested food, then gastroparesis is very likely to be present. Fluctuating, difficult-to-predict glucose levels may also reflect the presence of gastroparesis. Diabetes and the GI Tract The motility of your GI tract, which we were just speaking of, is controlled by an outer sleeve of muscles that surrounds your GI tract. They are controlled by a complex nervous system. Diabetes can damage these nerves, and it is this neurological long-term complication of diabetes that can lead to gastrointestinal disorders. How do we know this is the case? First, many of the people with gastroparesis have long-standing diabete Continue reading >>

New Type 2 Diabetes Sweating After Eating 2017 – Why Do Diabetics Sweat At Night

New Type 2 Diabetes Sweating After Eating 2017 – Why Do Diabetics Sweat At Night

Why Do Diabetics Sweat at Night FULL VERSION: Video credits to Михаил Суворкин YouTube channel Diabetes Related Tweets Around The World Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sweating After Eating

Diabetes And Sweating After Eating

Although often ill-timed and embarrassing, sweating after eating is something diabetics can treat. This condition is called gustatory sweating, and it often involves profuse sweating on both sides of your face, scalp, neck and chest. This condition is not well understood, but investigational reports have found that a medication and a topical cream help. Ask your doctor if you need treatment. Video of the Day Scientists aren't sure why gustatory sweating happens with diabetics. But the condition has been linked to complications such as nerve and kidney damage, as well as poorly controlled blood sugar. In a "Diabetic Medicine" study, 69 percent of the diabetics who reported gustatory sweating had nephropathy, or kidney damage; 36 percent had neuropathy or nerve damage. Chewing activates the sweating, and the condition is marked by sweating about the face, scalp and neck. Some gustatory sweating is normal, especially after you eat spicy foods, but in diabetes, it's often profuse, inappropriate or unexpected sweating. The American Diabetes Association reports that cheese and chocolate are two of the most common causes of such sweating. Pickles, vinegar, fresh fruit, salty foods and alcohol may also trigger gustatory sweating. Oral medicines and roll-on ointments can be used to treat gustatory sweating in diabetes. A topical ointment called glycopyrrolate successfully stopped it in a case study reported in the "Archives of Internal Medicine." The authors reported it was safe, effective and well tolerated. A Dutch study reported in the "Netherlands Journal of Medicine" that oxybutynin, a pill, provided "striking" relief from gustatory sweating. If you seek treatment of gustatory sweating from your doctor, ask about the side effects of both of these medications. In a study pub Continue reading >>

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