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Diabetes Surgery Cure

Weight Loss Surgery: Diabetes Cure?

Weight Loss Surgery: Diabetes Cure?

Sept. 8, 2014 -- Weight loss surgery is an expensive and potentially risky way to treat type 2 diabetes . Yet more studies are showing it can also be very successful -- in some cases, more so than drugs and lifestyle changes. Despite what experts are calling remarkable results, though, theyre not saying weight loss surgery is a cure. Heres what they do know: A recent study found that type 2 diabetes can stay in remission for as long as 15 years after weight -loss surgery. Remission happens when a person with diabetes achieves blood sugar levels no longer in the diabetes range without medications for at least one year. The research bolstered previous shorter-term findings that suggest the surgery somehow changes the bodys metabolism and calms diabetes in certain people. Surgeons who routinely do the surgery say they're not surprised at the study's findings. It showed that 30% of people with type 2 diabetes were in remission 15 years post-surgery, compared to 7% whose diabetes was managed with drugs and lifestyle changes. Surgery could be a life-saver for certain obese people with diabetes, experts say. They include people who: Have tried to lose weight by traditional methods but could not Even among people with diabetes who are good candidates, surgery should not become the first treatment they try, experts say. We are absolutely the last stop. We are there for the person who has tried everything, says Richard Stahl, MD. He's the medical director of bariatric surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Recovering from surgery can take up to 2 weeks. Also, people who get surgery must still make major lifestyle changes to keep the benefits. Its not a simple fix, its a big ordeal to qualify for, and its not simple to recover from, Stahl says. Nor is it typically co Continue reading >>

Why The New Surgical Cure For Diabetes Will Fail!

Why The New Surgical Cure For Diabetes Will Fail!

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 03/27/2012 10:32 am ETUpdatedMay 27, 2012 Why the New Surgical Cure for Diabetes Will Fail! Two seemingly groundbreaking studies, published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine found that Type 2 diabetes, or "diabesity," could be cured with gastric bypass surgery. The flurry of media attention and medical commentary hail this as a great advance in the fight against diabetes. The cure was finally discovered for what was always thought to be a progressive incurable disease. But is this really a step backwards? Yes, and here's why. No one is asking the most obvious question. How did the surgery cure the diabetes? Did the surgeons simply cut out the diabetes like a cancerous tumor? No. The patients in the studies changed their diet. They changed what they put in their stomach and that's something that doesn't require surgery to change. If they had surgery and they didn't stop bingeing on donuts and soda they would get violently ill and vomit and have diarrhea. That's enough to scare anyone skinny. If I designed a study that gave someone an electric shock every time they ate too much or the wrong thing, I could reverse diabetes in a few weeks. But you can get the benefits of a gastric bypass without the pain of surgery, vomiting and malnutrition. Most don't realize that after gastric bypass, diabetes can disappear within a week or two while people are still morbidly obese. How does that happen? It is because food is the most powerful drug on the planet and real, whole, fresh food can turn on thousands of healing genes and hundreds of healing hormones and molecules that create health within days or weeks. In fact, what you put on your fork is more powerful than anything you can find i Continue reading >>

Low Cost Diabetes Surgery In India

Low Cost Diabetes Surgery In India

Plan your Diabetes Surgery in India with Forerunners Healthcare Consultants Diabetes Surgery today ranks among the most performed surgery in India as the number of diabetes patients is increasing rapidly. Medical fraternity in India is highly-skilled to treat the disorder, but it can be tricky for overseas patients to find the right surgeon in India. Forerunners Healthcare Consultants in India is a major medical value provider offering easy access to the best healthcare facilities in India at affordable rates. A patient only has to send us a quick enquiry and the company executive will help through with the procedure. How things function at Forerunners Healthcare Consultants Primary services : We offer assistance in arranging medical visa, provide accommodation for the patient and family, meals, appointment with surgeon. We also provide health diet as advised by the attending surgeon, to and fro airport travel, vacation tour, etc. Comfort : Our company ensures you remain stress-free from the moment you land in India, and all through the procedure, even after your surgery is performed. Communication : We at Forerunners Healthcare Consultants do a detailed study of your needs and send references to respective medical experts accordingly. Be rest assured as the best in field surgeons shall be giving you a new life. Low cost : The overall expenses, including surgeries, stay, meals, medication, flight tickets, for diabetes surgery in India are very much less than most of the countries offering the same state-of-art facilities. Quality care : Forerunners Healthcare Consultants has association with a panel of doctors in India who will never compromise with the efforts in surgery to be performed. International Patient Experience I am Mr Saka from Nigeria. I needed a surgery for Continue reading >>

Curing Diabetes: The Only Confirmed (pseudo) Cure

Curing Diabetes: The Only Confirmed (pseudo) Cure

Curing diabetes has been a goal of physicians and diabetic patients since it was first discovered by the Ancient Greeks in the 1st century (1). Almost 2,000 years later, it seems that we have finally learned how to cure diabetes, or at least provide a “pseudo-cure” that puts diabetes into potentially permanent remission: bariatric surgery. Review and click the sections below to learn more about the only known cure for diabetes. Continue reading >>

New Study: Weight-loss Surgery May Cure Diabetes

New Study: Weight-loss Surgery May Cure Diabetes

New study: Weight-loss surgery may cure diabetes It seemed too good to be true when 60 Minutes reported it in 2008, but a new study confirms that weight-loss surgery can put type 2 diabetes in remission Could weight-loss surgery be a cure for type 2 diabetes? That's exactly what a new study, published today by the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests. The study showed that weight-loss surgery is dramatically more effective in the treatment of type 2 diabetes than a conventional treatment of diet changes and medication. Patients in the study suffered from severe type 2 diabetes, and most went into remission after undergoing one of two bariatric surgeries. "It's an unprecedented effect that we've never seen in diabetes before," says surgeon Dr. Francesco Rubino, senior author of the NEJM study and director of The Diabetes Surgery Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. "Remission hasn't even been a word in the textbooks about diabetes." Doctors have been performing bariatric (or weight-loss) surgeries since the 1950s. Until now, the procedures have been considered just a treatment for morbid obesity. "The name 'bariatric' comes from a Greek term 'baros,' which means weight," explained Dr. Rubino. "In the 1950s, there were anecdotal reports that diabetes disappeared after these surgeries, but it was considered a side-effect of weight loss." Four years ago, Dr. Rubino was interviewed by Lesley Stahl for a 60 Minutes report on gastric bypass surgery as a potential cure for diabetes. "At the time it was little more than an exciting pie-in-the-sky theory," says 60 Minutes producer Shachar Bar-On, who worked with Stahl on story. Back then, Dr. Rubino had been performing the surgeries on diabetic rats, effectively reversing the animals' diabe Continue reading >>

The Solution For Obesity And Diabetes Already Exists. So Why Do So Few People Know About It?

The Solution For Obesity And Diabetes Already Exists. So Why Do So Few People Know About It?

If your appendix fails, surgery is your best option. Blocked arteries? Surgery. Obesity and diabetes? Until recently, the most obvious solutions were diet, exercise, and drugs as needed; however a growing body of research suggests the optimal way to manage these conditions is with—that's right—surgery. "Why isn't every type 2 diabetic referred for an operation?" says Mitchell Roslin, MD, chief of bariatric and metabolic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "I ask myself this every day." His puzzlement stems from a raft of recent reports about the stunning long-term effects of bariatric surgery on diabetes, as well as weight loss. The Cleveland Clinic's groundbreaking STAMPEDE (a charming acronym for the clunkily named Surgical Therapy And Medications Potentially Eradicate Diabetes Efficiently) study, published in 2012, was the first to show that bariatric surgery is more effective than medicine in controlling diabetes in obese people. The Cleveland Clinic has since published a follow-up study showing that gastric bypass surgery significantly improves and, in fully 50% of the cases they looked at, even reverses diabetes. There are several types of bariatric surgery, but the most common reduce the size of the stomach with a gastric band or through removal of a portion of the stomach (called sleeve gastrectomy), or resect and re-route the small intestine to a small stomach pouch (gastric bypass surgery). "It's amazing, honestly," says lead investigator Philip Schauer, MD, director of the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute of the results his team compiled. "We hesitate to use the word 'cure' because that means no more diabetes for the rest of one's life. Remission is more accurate; it means blood sugar is normal without medication. But it is Continue reading >>

Diabetes Surgery Faqs - The Mount Sinai Hospital

Diabetes Surgery Faqs - The Mount Sinai Hospital

Diabetes Surgery Frequently Asked Questions Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin, which is necessary to be able to produce energy. When you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, the basic fuel for the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can lead to diabetes complications. Millions of Americans have been diagnosed with this disease. Is it really possible to cure Type 2 diabetes through bariatric surgery? New research has shown that metabolic surgery, often known as bariatric surgery, can be used to cure Type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that patients who undergo this surgery can see complete remission of the disease. Patients at The Mount Sinai Hospital have credited this surgery for curing their Type 2 diabetes. Researchers have found that this operation helps to control and even cure Type 2 diabetes. The surgery not only helps people lose weight, but the changes to the patients' anatomy following the surgery alter the levels of gut hormones that affect the metabolism of sugars and fats. How do I know if my insurance will cover this surgery? Nationally recognized guidelines state that obese Type 2 diabetics with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 35 (kg/m2) or greater are eligible to undergo surgery for their obesity. Those with a BMI of 30 or greater may undergo laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery. If you are unsure if you meet these guidelines, it's best to consult your surgeon. What should I do if I want to learn more? The Mount Sinai Hospital has a wonderful team of surgeons who perform bariatric surgery. You can consult our specialists to learn Continue reading >>

Can Bariatric Surgery Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

Can Bariatric Surgery Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

Can bariatric surgery cure type 1 diabetes? Obesity is common in Type 2 diabetes but hardly seen in Type 1 diabetics. There is a subset of patients who are obese Type 1 diabetics. Overweight patients with Type 1 diabetes are considered as good candidates for bariatric surgery. However, it is not going to cause remission of Type 1 diabetes. It is certainly going to bring about better control of diabetes as will be shown by the result of the investigations such as reduced Hb1Ac, better blood glucose control and even the requirement of insulin would be reduced. Obesity with Type 1 diabetes may lead to insulin resistance. Bariatric surgery helps to reduce this insulin resistance and hence decreases the amount of required insulin. Cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, cholesterol and triglyceride levels will be well taken care off . BMI and excessive weight would be reduced. In nutshell Gastric bypass surgery, a type of weight loss or bariatric surgery is a safe, feasible and effective way of weight reduction in young Type 1 diabetics with severe obesity and comorbidities such as high blood pressure(Hypertension) and hyperlipidemia. If the patient has autoimmune Type 1 diabetes with severe obesity for several years and have failed in their previous attempts to lose weight, can consider surgery as an option after consulting the Bariatric surgeon and discussing the benefits and risks of the surgery with him/her. Important: You need to take an informed decision after consultation with your bariatric surgeon. Continue reading >>

Bariatric Surgery: A Cure For Diabetes?

Bariatric Surgery: A Cure For Diabetes?

Purpose of reviewTo review the basic mechanisms of caloric intake reduction of bariatric surgery and its clinical and metabolic outcomes. To describe novel bariatric procedures, their effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity and to explain the proposed mechanisms for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) resolution. Recent findingsThe effects of surgically induced weight loss on T2DM have elucidated in part the role of proximal and distal gastrointestinal bypass on insulin sensitivity. A dual mechanism for improvement in glucose homeostasis after bariatric surgery has been proposed that appears to be weight loss independent. SummaryBariatric surgery is the most effective therapy for obesity and obesity-related comorbidities today that provide high rates of resolution of T2DM with improvements in insulin resistance and -cell function. Novel bariatric procedures offer a unique opportunity to understand the pathophysiology of T2DM and to identify potential pharmacologic targets for effective T2DM treatments and a potential cure. Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA Correspondence to J.E. Varela, MD, MPH, FACS, FASMBS, Associate Professor of Surgery, Section of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Box 8109, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA E-mail: [email protected] 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care. Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Please try after some time. Continue reading >>

Plastic Gut Lining May Cure Or Control Diabetes

Plastic Gut Lining May Cure Or Control Diabetes

Diabetes could be cured or controlled with a simple gut operation, according to British doctors running trials of therapies for one of the UK’s biggest health problems. Patients treated at King’s College Hospital and University College Hospital in London and City Hospital in Birmingham found their diabetes had disappeared or become much milder after the operations, which reduce the gut’s release of hormones into the blood. The findings offer hope for about 4m people in this country with type 2 diabetes, which is often linked to lifestyle factors such as obesity. Sufferers include the rower Sir Steve Redgrave, the actor Tom Hanks and Diane Abbott, the shadow home secretary. The results suggest that surgery could help even without any weight loss. Francesco Rubino, professor of… Continue reading >>

Bariatric Surgery Versus Intensive Medical Therapy For Diabetes — 5-year Outcomes

Bariatric Surgery Versus Intensive Medical Therapy For Diabetes — 5-year Outcomes

Long-term results from randomized, controlled trials that compare medical therapy with surgical therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes are limited. We assessed outcomes 5 years after 150 patients who had type 2 diabetes and a body-mass index (BMI; the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of 27 to 43 were randomly assigned to receive intensive medical therapy alone or intensive medical therapy plus Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy. The primary outcome was a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.0% or less with or without the use of diabetes medications. Of the 150 patients who underwent randomization, 1 patient died during the 5-year follow-up period; 134 of the remaining 149 patients (90%) completed 5 years of follow-up. At baseline, the mean (±SD) age of the 134 patients was 49±8 years, 66% were women, the mean glycated hemoglobin level was 9.2±1.5%, and the mean BMI was 37±3.5. At 5 years, the criterion for the primary end point was met by 2 of 38 patients (5%) who received medical therapy alone, as compared with 14 of 49 patients (29%) who underwent gastric bypass (unadjusted P=0.01, adjusted P=0.03, P=0.08 in the intention-to-treat analysis) and 11 of 47 patients (23%) who underwent sleeve gastrectomy (unadjusted P=0.03, adjusted P=0.07, P=0.17 in the intention-to-treat analysis). Patients who underwent surgical procedures had a greater mean percentage reduction from baseline in glycated hemoglobin level than did patients who received medical therapy alone (2.1% vs. 0.3%, P=0.003). At 5 years, changes from baseline observed in the gastric-bypass and sleeve-gastrectomy groups were superior to the changes seen in the medical-therapy group with respect to body weight (−23%, −19%, and −5% in the gastric-bypass, sleeve-gas Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Surgery? Diabetes & Weight Loss Treatment

What Is Metabolic Surgery? Diabetes & Weight Loss Treatment

Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk factors that increases the chance of developing heart disease , diabetes and stroke. You must have at least three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline indicating abdominal obesity or "having an apple shape." Excess fat in the stomach area is a greater risk factor for heart disease than excess fat in other parts of the body, such as on the hips. A high triglyceride level (or you're on medicine to treat high triglycerides). Triglycerides are a type of fat found in the blood. A low HDL cholesterol level (or you're on medicine to treat low HDL cholesterol). HDL sometimes is called "good" cholesterol. This is because it helps remove cholesterol from your arteries. A low HDL cholesterol level raises your risk for heart disease. High blood pressure (or you're on medicine to treat high blood pressure). Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood. If this pressure rises and stays high over time, it can damage your heart and lead to plaque buildup. High fasting blood sugar (or you're on medicine to treat high blood sugar). Mildly high blood sugar may be an early sign of diabetes. The treatment of Metabolic Syndrome by surgical methods is called Metabolic Surgery. Experiments were done in the last half of the 20th century to see if diseases like high lipids and cholesterol could be treated with surgical procedures such as intestinal bypass. In 1995, Dr. Walter Pories and his research team published an article titled "Who would have thought it? An operation proves to be the most effective therapy for adult-onset diabetes mellitus". Since that landmark paper, much evidence has been accumulated showing that surgery can cure/imp Continue reading >>

The Bypass Cure | Discovermagazine.com

The Bypass Cure | Discovermagazine.com

FROM THE DECEMBER 2012 ISSUE Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in the operating room. The implications are staggering for halting one of Americas deadliest diseases. An X-ray depicts the upper gastrointestinal tract of an obese patient six months after gastric bypass surgery. The reduced size of the stomach makes this patient feel fuller sooner, resulting in the consumption of less food. Garbed in a blue surgical robe, mask, and cap, Dr. Julio Teixeira stands over a supersize operating table where Nancy Rubios orblike belly erupts through a rectangular opening in sterile blue sheets. He grips two long metal rods, looking as if he were poised for a game of foosball, but his actions are methodical and gentle while his eyes intensely study one of the two large, flat screens that flank Rubios body. Teixeira, an expert at this kind of minimally invasive procedure, is performing gastric bypass surgery, one of Americas most common operations. But he also may be curing his patient of type 2 diabetes, literally overnight. At just under five feet, Rubio is an obese 208 pounds, nearly double the 120- to 130-pound healthy weight for a person her height. The 52-year-old native of Ecuador developed type 2 diabetes after her children were born more than two decades ago. Her condition worsened as a fast-food diet packed on the pounds: Pizza and Chinese food were her favorites. Obesity increases type 2 diabetes risk, and often the two go hand in hand. Over many years, Rubios body broke down her calorie-packed diet into glucose, a sugar, which was absorbed into her blood. Her pancreas produced insulin that unlocked her cells so the glucose could enter and produce the energy she needed to function. If the body cannot produce insulin (as is the case in people with type 1 diabetes), or if th Continue reading >>

Weight-loss Surgery Can Reverse Diabetes, But Cure Is Elusive

Weight-loss Surgery Can Reverse Diabetes, But Cure Is Elusive

Bariatric surgery can help obese people lose weight, and excess weight is a big risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. So it makes sense to try to figure out whether the surgery could help control diabetes, too. So far the answer is yes, at least for some people and for three years. But surgery doesn't work for everyone, and the long-term implications remain unclear. More than one-third of the people who had gastric bypass surgery met glycemic control targets three years out, compared with 24 percent who had a different type of bariatric surgery called sleeve gastrectomy. And just 5 percent of people in a group treated with medication alone were able to meet that standard. It's one of the first randomized controlled trials to look at bariatric surgery as a treatment for Type 2 diabetes, which affects 23 million adults. Still, almost three-quarters of the people who had surgery didn't meet the study's target of normal blood sugar, or 6 percent on an A1C test. And some of the people who had surgery still needed to use glucose-lowering drugs, including insulin. "Even though they did not achieve that target, they did get a lot better," says Dr. Philip Schauer, director of the Bariatric and Metabolic Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, who led the study. The people who had surgery lowered their blood glucose levels 2.5 percentage points, on average, compared with 0.6 points for the people who didn't get surgery. The people who lost the most weight and those who had been diagnosed with diabetes no more than three years before surgery did best, Schauer tells Shots. "If you want to achieve a long-term remission, intervene sooner rather than later," he says. The results were presented at a meeting of cardiologists in Washington, D.C., and published online Monday by the New England Jour Continue reading >>

Bariatric Surgery For Type 2 Diabetes Reversal: The Risks

Bariatric Surgery For Type 2 Diabetes Reversal: The Risks

The twin epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes are on the rise. From 1986 to 2000, the prevalence of BMI 30 kg/m2 doubled, whereas that of BMI >40 kg/m2 quadrupled, and even extreme obesity of BMI 50 kg/m2 increased fivefold (1). Of particular concern is the alarming increasing prevalence of obesity among children, suggesting that the epidemic will worsen (2). The impact of obesity on longevity has been well documented. In the world, over 2.5 million deaths annually can be attributed to obesity; in the U.S. alone over 400,000 deaths attributable to obesity occur per year—second only to those attributable to cigarette smoking. There is a direct relationship between increasing BMI and relative risk of dying prematurely, as evidenced in the Nurses’ Health Study with a 100% increase in relative risk as BMI increased from 19 to 32 kg/m2. Annual risk of death can be as high as 40-fold that of an age- and sex-matched nonobese cohort (3,4). The Framingham data revealed that for each pound gained between ages 30 and 42 years there was a 1% increased mortality within 26 years, and for each pound gained thereafter there was a 2% increased mortality. Only one in seven obese individuals will reach the U.S. life expectancy of 76.9 years. In the morbidly obese population, average life expectancy is reduced by 9 years in women and by 12 years in men. It has been over 10 years since the resolution of type 2 diabetes was observed as an additional outcome of surgical treatment of morbid obesity. Moreover, it has been shown unequivocally that diabetes-related morbidity and mortality have declined significantly postoperatively, and this improvement in diabetes control is long lasting. Bypass procedures, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) and the biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), are Continue reading >>

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