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Diabetes Support Groups Online

Finding A Support Group For Type 2 Diabetes

Finding A Support Group For Type 2 Diabetes

After getting a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, you may be spurred to make important lifestyle changes. But these changes often don’t happen overnight, and enthusiasm for eating healthier, getting regular activity, and monitoring your blood sugar can be difficult to maintain over the long term. Finding and sticking with a support group can keep you engaged and motivated. According to the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support published in Diabetes Care in January 2013, on average, those initial health improvements people often make begin to diminish within six months if a person doesn’t have ongoing self-management support. But people with type 2 diabetes who attend support group meetings are better able to sustain or even build on their health improvements, according to a study published in the January 2012 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. The Benefits of Outside Support Family and friends are often the first line of diabetes support — and they can provide quite a bit, says Susan Gustavsson, RN, BSN, CDE, a diabetes nurse educator who leads diabetes support groups at the Center for Endocrinology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. However, Gustavsson says many people with type 2 diabetes often find that it's more helpful to talk with others personally dealing with the condition. “A diabetes support group can provide a place to go to discuss issues that others with the condition may be experiencing too,” she says. “It can help the person with diabetes realize that he or she is not alone.” There are several factors to consider when looking for a support group, Gustavsson says. Do you want a group that provides speakers or a traditional group with a facilitator who leads the discussion? You might want a support Continue reading >>

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Sometimes a person with diabetes can feel very alone and “different.” Support groups are important and helpful to people with diabetes, because they provide a venue to meet others who share similar medical and psychosocial concerns, according to Marilyn Ritholz, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist, at Joslin Diabetes Center. By meeting with others who have diabetes, you can feel that the members of the group can understand your experience firsthand. By sharing their experiences, group members can feel part of a community and gain a greater sense of value and power from this feeling of belonging. Diabetes Support Groups at Joslin Joslin offers different types of diabetes support groups. Some of these groups include: Women’s Diabetes Support Group- “We have found that women of different ages are facing specific issues. Therefore, the group provides a venue for discussion of particular concerns for women with diabetes,” Ritholz says. For example, Joslin is now running a women’s group for ages 21-35 years old that have type 1 diabetes and are facing concerns regarding diabetes management, acceptance of diabetes, relationships, and consideration of pregnancy. Couples Support Group- These groups only meet once and have couples share concerns and discuss what it’s like to live with diabetes in a relationship. “Both the person with diabetes and the significant other get support and understanding of diabetes from different perspectives.” Joslin offers other diabetes support groups, such as coping with diabetes, men’s age-based support groups, young and middle-aged women’s diabetes support group, and a Latino support group. There are also support groups available for children with diabetes and their parents. Each program includes supervised group activities f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Support Groups To Help Manage Diabetic Depression

Diabetes Support Groups To Help Manage Diabetic Depression

Diabetes support groups to help manage diabetic depression As a child, I remember hearing my parents and grandparents mention people they knew who had sugar diabetes. These conversations made me wonder if diabetes was like the bubonic plague; something you could catch that was a death sentence. Diabetes frightened me, and I knew I never wanted to have it. I didnt realize how much diabetes would affect my family until I reached my mid-teens. My Dad comes from a tight-knit family and has always had close relationships with his siblings. His oldest sister married a shoe salesman from Kentucky. Uncle Claude was a good old southern boy who enjoyed his sports and his beer. He was frequently the life of the party at family gatherings, always having a good joke or funny story to share. The two of us developed a strong bond through our love of University of Kentucky basketball and professional football. I always knew what his Christmas gift to me each year would be a new pair of Nike High-tops for my upcoming basketball season! When their family came to visit during the summer, I could always count on grabbing our baseball gloves and having a catch, shooting some hoops and having a hunting buddy to help control the gopher population. My uncle was always happy and upbeat, so it came as a total shock to me when I found out he had been diagnosed with Type II diabetes. His diabetes was detected as I was entering High School. He wasnt the type to be concerned about taking care of himself. In addition, relishing his beer, he smoked, ate what he pleased, and didnt believe in exercise. Absorbing every change necessary to manage his health proved to be a fierce struggle. His doctor placed him on a diabetic diet and prescribed medication for blood sugar control. He was instructed to quit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy...support Networks

Diabetes Advocacy...support Networks

"Few chronic conditions require as much vigilance as diabetes. Whether you're working at the office, relaxing by the fireplace or strolling on the deck of a Caribbean cruise-boat, diabetes follows you around like a hungry dog. Diabetes demands your attention day in and day out. You are required to balance your food intake with your exercise routine, to keep track of how much you ate and when you ate, to monitor your blood glucose levels, and possibly to take insulin..." The above was taken from Diabetes Dialogue in an article entitled Breaking Free of the Stress Zone by Gabrielle Bauer (Summer 2003, Volume 50 No. 2 Page 8). For us, it highlights why support is so very vital to all who have had this "hungry dog" move into their house. Support can be found in families, through diabetes teams, in local support groups, as well as online. www.childrenwithdiabetes.com offers mailing lists that support both parents, children, and teens as well as chat rooms that can be of great comfort, support, and information. Facebook , TuDiabetes and even Twitter offer many other great connections to the Diabetes Online Community (aka the DOC). InsulinPumpers.org An exceptionally informative site for those who are pumping insulin or looking to begin insulin pump therapy. Rufus and Ruby....the bears with Diabetes Support for children can also be found in various bears such as Rufus and Ruby who both provide comfort and help fund a cure. Rufus and Ruby, the Bears with Diabetes , have come to symbolize hope and support for those children living with Type 1 Diabetes. Created by a loving mother, Carol Cramer, after her own son was diagnosed with Type One Diabetes. Rufus and Ruby have patches where insulin should be injected, hearts on their paws for glucose testing, and a Medic Alert bracelet Continue reading >>

How To Find Diabetes Support Groups

How To Find Diabetes Support Groups

Diabetics need information and support, and groups offer both.(ISTOCKPHOTO)Joining a community of people with diabeteseither an online or in-person versioncan provide you with a rich source of encouragement and information. Members can help you solve problems, suggest questions for your next doctor's visit, and get you through tough times. How one man found help online Paul Shirley felt better after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in December 2006. For years he'd been battling sinus infections and fatigue, which he now knows were issues related to the diabetes. He changed his diet and started taking medication. Then he aggravated an old shoulder injury, which required surgery and physical therapy. He started feeling terrible again and had difficulty controlling his blood sugar. Support Group"It's a spirit-lifting type of group" Watch videoMore about diabetes The 56-year-old Easley, S.C., resident wondered if it could be related to his injury. So he asked the members of a diabetes-related email group. Of course, they said: Being sick or injured can throw off your blood sugar. "You can't go to your doctor or even your diabetes educator every time you have a question. But you can go on this list, and people are glad to talk to you about it," he says. Although the support group members aren't experts, their "friendly, experienced" advice is sometimes all the help he needs. Shirley, who's working on his doctorate in psychology, notes that some people in online groups may argue or push unwanted advice on you. In that case, it's best to ignore them or privately email the moderator, the person responsible for maintaining order on the discussion board or email list. To find an online discussion board or email list, check out the American Diabetes Association, dLife, or Diab Continue reading >>

I Have Pre-diabetes (impaired Glucose Tolerance) And Found Answers To My Diabetes Questions From These Diabetes Support Groups | The Health Guide

I Have Pre-diabetes (impaired Glucose Tolerance) And Found Answers To My Diabetes Questions From These Diabetes Support Groups | The Health Guide

It isnt hard today to find diabetes support groups thanks to the Internet. A simple Google search will bring up a plethora of diabetes support forums aimed for people with the disease, family members who want more answers, or those like myself who are faced with the prospect of managing diabetes if conditions dont improve. I learned the following are risk factors for pre-diabetes: Having high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, or increased triglycerides Giving birth to a baby weighing more than 10 pounds (as a guy, this most definitely wasnt a risk factor for me) I was also watching out for the following symptoms of pre-diabetes: Start Here: The American Diabetes Association When I was looking for answers, I turned to the first place my mom went to when she was diagnosed with diabetes in 2006: The American Diabetes Association (ADA). Founded in 1940, the ADA is based in the United States and funds research as well as treatment for those who have diabetes. The ADA also delivers services in communities across the country, provides reliable information about the disease, and helps protect the rights of those who have been denied employment because of their diabetes. While the ADA is a huge, nationwide organization, they provide very localized support efforts and have offices in a multitude of communities, including my own city. Chances are, there is a chapter of the ADA in or near your city, too. All you need to is type your zip code into the ADAs local office search engine to find the branch location nearest you. No matter what, definitely check out the ADA for information and answers to all your diabetes-related questions. However, I didnt stop there when I was looking for help. I also suggest you check out the following support groups: Diabetes Prevention Support Ce Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Find support you need when you need it most Whether you're interested in joining a vibrant online T1D community, in need of advice from someone who’s been there or looking for educational tools to help you or your loved one manage the disease—JDRF is here to help. Whatever your question and wherever you are, JDRF’s online T1D resource community connects you with others—online or in your area—who’ve been where you are. Support and information near you JDRF chapters offer a variety of events to inform, support and connect you with the T1D community. Along with several generous partners, we provide information to help you understand and better manage the daily burden of T1D to stay as strong and healthy as possible. When your child receives a diagnosis of T1D, it can feel overwhelming. As you adjust to life with T1D, you’ll find helpful information and support in the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF T1D Care Kit is a free resource providing information and tools to educate, support and inspire adults newly diagnosed with T1D. Toolkits for all ages and stages Our free T1D toolkits for parents, adults and educators are comprehensive guides that arm you with the knowledge, resources and confidence you and your family need to navigate life with T1D. Continue reading >>

Extra Support For Diabetics: Online Support Groups

Extra Support For Diabetics: Online Support Groups

Extra Support for Diabetics: Online Support Groups The benefits of social support on physical and mental well-being have been widely documented by psychologists at UCLA, the University of Minnesota, and many other institutions. Support groups provide a valuable resource for social support, but not everyone feels comfortable in a public group setting. For some people, online support groups provide much needed social support. Support groups are great for those with diabetes, or whose loved ones have diabetes, because struggling with this condition can be challenging at best. Support groups provide a forum for people suffering from the same ailments to share personal experiences and offer emotional, moral and practical support. Participants in diabetes support groups understand the inherent difficulties in managing blood sugar levels, insulin injections and diabetic diets. People feel less isolated and judged while participating in a platform where they can discuss their feelings and anxieties. You may develop a clearer sense of what to expect with your situation by comparing notes with others. People can share basic management skills such as how to count carbs and successfully administer insulin injections. This exchange of ideas gives a great sense of empowerment and control over your diabetes! Online support groups, like the diabetes group on SupportGroups.com, are convenient for people who may not have the time or the means to attend in-person group therapy sessions. Online support groups also work well for people who may feel uncomfortable discussing their condition and their feelings about it in front of a group of strangers. Its easier to be honest and open about your experiences in an online setting. With diabetes, its polite to keep all personal information confi Continue reading >>

Seeking Support For Type 2 Diabetes

Seeking Support For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can seem overwhelming at times, but you can take control back. It helps to have people who encourage you and show you new ways to manage your diabetes day to day. Put them on your go-to list, and reach out any time you need their insight and motivation. You need a medical team that knows diabetes inside and out. They could include: An endocrinologist, who has a lot of experience working with people who have diabetes A pharmacist, who's familiar with all your medicines A registered dietitian, who can give you pointers on what to eat All of these professionals work with you to help you stay well. It helps to talk to someone who can relate to what you're going through, since they have diabetes, too. While support groups are not psychotherapy groups, they can provide you with a safe, accepting place to share your situation and get comfort and encouragement. Type 2 diabetes can affect the entire family. So get them, and your friends, involved. Share with them what you're going through and how you manage your diabetes. For instance, tell them why you have to check your blood sugar regularly, or what sorts of snacks and meals are OK for you. Want someone to help you get them up to speed? You might want to hold a family meeting, and invite your diabetes educator to answer their questions. You deserve to feel good emotionally. If you don't, you may want to talk to a therapist. In therapy, you'll plan positive ways to handle your diabetes. It's not just for people with conditions like depression or anxiety . Anyone can benefit. You can get a fresh point of view that helps you work through your challenges. That's important, because stress can affect your blood sugar levels . Look for a licensed mental health professional who works with people who have diabetes or Continue reading >>

Resources For Parents, Teens, And Young Adults

Resources For Parents, Teens, And Young Adults

Printed resources, support groups, and online forums can provide useful information and support at an often-stressful time of life. TRANSITIONS From Pediatric to Adult Health Care The National Diabetes Education Program has put together a number of materials to ease the transition from pediatric to adult care for teens with diabetes. Among them are a transition planning checklist, fill-in form summarizing a teen’s health status to be prepared by the pediatric team for the new adult care provider, and links to a wide variety of resources. To order NDEP publications by phone, call (888) 693-NDEP (6337). THE 411 ON DISABILITY DISCLOSURE A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities www.ncwd-youth.info/411-on-disability-disclosure National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability/Youth This downloadable workbook offers students and young adults with disabilities the opportunity to think about whether, when, and how to disclose a disability. Rather than tell them what to do, the workbook offers information and poses questions to help readers explore their personal attitudes and needs, as well as their options to disclose — or not — in various settings. STUDENTS WITH DIABETES www.studentswithdiabetes.com This is a growing network of support and interaction for young adults on college and university campuses. Check the Web site to see whether your student’s school has a chapter. If not, suggest that one be started! Type One Nationa This online support network sponsored by the JDRF has numerous groups for young people with Type 1 diabetes, teens, college students, and young adults, as well as a group for parents of teens. ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES American Diabetes Association Community The ADA’s online community boards provides a forum for adults with Type 1 diabe Continue reading >>

Joining A Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment

Joining A Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment

Joining a Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment Patients who find a support group that "fits" are more likely to take their insulin or other diabetes medication over the long-term. Taking diabetes medicine on schedule, whether injecting insulin or swallowing a pill, can be annoying, and sometimes difficult. You know taking your diabetes mediation consistently means good news for your blood sugar, but follow up can be a problem as life gets in the way. Your doctor has probably nagged when havent been able to stick to your schedule for a dozen different reasons. Now there is something to make its easier and more likely that you can do better. Based on findings of a study presented at the World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease in Universal City, California, when you join a support programone that you ''click'' withit can help you manage your medication routine much better.1 It may also help you improve your diet, exercise and other behaviors that impact your diabetes management. And, you probably don't even need to leave home. In this study,1 men and women who were enrolled in an online support program were nearly twice as likely to take their medication as prescribed and less likely to discontinue it, says Timothy Reid, MD, a family medicine physician from Janesville, Wisconsin and senior author of the poster who presented the results of the study. Joining a support group assures better long-term care for people with diabetes. Dr. Reid examined the impact of a program called COACH on patients taking Toujeo insulin, but he says many other programs are offered to patients depending upon their needs and in all cases the support works, and not just for the medicine in the study.1 The idea, Dr. Reid says, is that patients who feel supporte Continue reading >>

Who | Patient Support Groups

Who | Patient Support Groups

Treatment involves more than routine medical diagnosis, hospitalised care or even the prescription of drugs. When confronted by illness, patients seek professional help and advice from their doctors, and also rely on support from family members, peers and fellow patients. Patients' with genetic diseases are no exception to this reality. They too face complexities and complications that require a network of professional support staff, family, and friends. To this end several societies and organizations, specialising both in general health improvement as well as illness-specific objectives, offer support groups as integral components of treatment plans for patients with genetic disorders and for their families. These support groups may offer a variety of services, including educational materials, consultations, group therapy, team building activities, and other resources to teach individuals how to cope and adapt to the lifestyle that is often dictated by their illnesses. This section offers a compilation of online resources from around the world on support groups for multiple illnesses. Please note that if you do not find a support group for your needs in this listing, you may locate one by contacting your local hospital or genetic labs. Continue reading >>

4 Tips For Finding The Best Diabetes Support Network

4 Tips For Finding The Best Diabetes Support Network

Home Health and Wellness 4 Tips for Finding the Best Diabetes Support Network 4 Tips for Finding the Best Diabetes Support Network Posted by Karen Graffeo On February 23, 2017 In Health and Wellness For more than two decades, I thought I had to handle my life with diabetes on my own. It didnt occur to me that having a network of support would be beneficial to me. But as it turns out, having a support network has made me healthier, more engaged and informed, and less alone. I didnt know I was missing support until I found it. However, the idea of building a support network can often seem overwhelming. So here are 4 tips on how to get started. 1) Begin with friends and family. Yes, they may drive us all crazy sometimes by saying the wrong thing about diabetes at the wrong time. But if you let them know what support you need, they can often become your biggest assets. After all, they already love you and want the best for you! 2) Ask your healthcare team for local support group recommendations. Getting together with a group of people who share the same condition you have can be more rewarding than you might think. They get it because they are living it too. There may already be groups like this happening in your area, and your healthcare team might be able to connect you. 3) Look online. Support is no more than a click away at any time of the day or night. You can connect with other people living with diabetes over Twitter (#DSMA), Facebook and many other social media sites like Diabetes Sisters and TuDiabetes . Joining the DOC (Diabetes Online Community), is a great way to build your support network. 4) Start your own support group. A great way to connect with others with diabetes is by starting your own group. Several years ago we formed a local group that would meet fo Continue reading >>

Top 10 Online Resources For People With Diabetes

Top 10 Online Resources For People With Diabetes

Top 10 Online Resources for People with Diabetes Online communities, networks, and publications can be a great source of information for both people newly diagnosed with diabetes, and also for people who have been living with diabetes for a while. Below are some of our favorite websites and online resources for finding support and learning about diabetes. This online magazine features insights on everything diabetes-related including lifestyle, products & tech, recipes, nutrition, and overall health. We love the articles here and how diverse the content is. Some of our favorite posts include: Emergency Preparedness Guide for People with Diabetes diaTribe is an online publication with articles geared at helping peoplemake sense of diabetes.The site features resources for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, and discusses everything from mental health to recipes to technology products. Some of our recent favorite articles include: Since 2004, dLife has been a platform for people to more about diabetes and connect with other diabetes consumers, patients, and caregivers. Theyre articles and resources are highly comprehensive, including the following resources: JDRFis the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Their organization does incredible work in the community, hosting a myriad of local events. Apart from the research they fund, they have a highly comprehensive compendium of resources and informational documents. Some of our favorite resources are: T1D Connection Program : Get support and connect with a volunteer and discuss your questions and connect with the T1D community at JDRF. Online Diabetes Support Team : Ask and get answers to all your T1D questions from JDRF volunteers. T1D Toolkits : Resources and advice on multiple facets of T1D. The Jo Continue reading >>

Cdf Support Groups

Cdf Support Groups

You are not alone with type 1 diabetes! Newly diagnosed? Been doing this for years? Hit a rough patch? Need/want to talk to others affected by diabetes?…whatever your situation, please come for some informal conversation. All are welcome, adults, parents, children and teenagers, and other family members. We want to give you the opportunity to meet other people who are affected by diabetes, whether you are the type 1 or have family, friends, significant others, etc. who do. You’ll love being a part of the diabetes community! Join our mailing list to receive updates on CDF Support Groups! Timings and location vary, but are currently focused in Denver & surrounding areas. Receive Support Group Updates Continue reading >>

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