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Diabetes Support Groups Online

Top 10 Online Resources For People With Diabetes

Top 10 Online Resources For People With Diabetes

Top 10 Online Resources for People with Diabetes Online communities, networks, and publications can be a great source of information for both people newly diagnosed with diabetes, and also for people who have been living with diabetes for a while. Below are some of our favorite websites and online resources for finding support and learning about diabetes. This online magazine features insights on everything diabetes-related including lifestyle, products & tech, recipes, nutrition, and overall health. We love the articles here and how diverse the content is. Some of our favorite posts include: Emergency Preparedness Guide for People with Diabetes diaTribe is an online publication with articles geared at helping peoplemake sense of diabetes.The site features resources for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, and discusses everything from mental health to recipes to technology products. Some of our recent favorite articles include: Since 2004, dLife has been a platform for people to more about diabetes and connect with other diabetes consumers, patients, and caregivers. Theyre articles and resources are highly comprehensive, including the following resources: JDRFis the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Their organization does incredible work in the community, hosting a myriad of local events. Apart from the research they fund, they have a highly comprehensive compendium of resources and informational documents. Some of our favorite resources are: T1D Connection Program : Get support and connect with a volunteer and discuss your questions and connect with the T1D community at JDRF. Online Diabetes Support Team : Ask and get answers to all your T1D questions from JDRF volunteers. T1D Toolkits : Resources and advice on multiple facets of T1D. The Jo Continue reading >>

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Sometimes a person with diabetes can feel very alone and “different.” Support groups are important and helpful to people with diabetes, because they provide a venue to meet others who share similar medical and psychosocial concerns, according to Marilyn Ritholz, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist, at Joslin Diabetes Center. By meeting with others who have diabetes, you can feel that the members of the group can understand your experience firsthand. By sharing their experiences, group members can feel part of a community and gain a greater sense of value and power from this feeling of belonging. Diabetes Support Groups at Joslin Joslin offers different types of diabetes support groups. Some of these groups include: Women’s Diabetes Support Group- “We have found that women of different ages are facing specific issues. Therefore, the group provides a venue for discussion of particular concerns for women with diabetes,” Ritholz says. For example, Joslin is now running a women’s group for ages 21-35 years old that have type 1 diabetes and are facing concerns regarding diabetes management, acceptance of diabetes, relationships, and consideration of pregnancy. Couples Support Group- These groups only meet once and have couples share concerns and discuss what it’s like to live with diabetes in a relationship. “Both the person with diabetes and the significant other get support and understanding of diabetes from different perspectives.” Joslin offers other diabetes support groups, such as coping with diabetes, men’s age-based support groups, young and middle-aged women’s diabetes support group, and a Latino support group. There are also support groups available for children with diabetes and their parents. Each program includes supervised group activities f Continue reading >>

Organizations & Support Groups

Organizations & Support Groups

Need Financial Help with U.S. Diabetes Supplies and Medications? Here is a website with information about programs and resources that may help. Click Here! JDRF is the leading global organization focused on type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. The goal of JDRF research is to improve the lives of all people affected by T1D by accelerating progress on the most promising opportunities for curing, better treating, and preventing T1D. ADA We lead the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fight for those affectedby diabetes. Check out their Safe At SchoolProgram glu We are a type 1 diabetes community who is accelerating promising research by seeking answers, sharing wisdom and offering support. Students With Diabetes aims to create a community and connection point for young adults with diabetes ages 18-30 on both college campuses and in local communities across the country. diabetes hands foundation Diabetes can be a very isolating disease, so we provide platforms where people with diabetes and their loved ones can connect and have an open dialog about their experiences with this chronic condition. Children with Diabetes The online community for kids, families and adults with diabetes. Connected in Motion We are people with T1D who share a vision: to create a culture of support & engagement in diabetes self-management through peer-based experiential diabetes education, sport, and outdoor adventure. (Based in Canada) ConsumerSafety.org is an information and news organization focused on health and safety topics. They provide information on health conditions like Diabetes, as well as recalls for products, medical devices and drugs, and relevant news. ConsumerSafety.Org works with experts to maintain a high level of information quality, to help readers like you stay i Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Diabetes Support Groups

The Importance Of Diabetes Support Groups

The Importance of Diabetes Support Groups The Importance of Diabetes Support Groups Post Date: September 2017 | Category: Diabetes Diabetes support groups can be a crucial tool in managing your diabetes. Peer support can be the missing link in helping people with diabetes address the psychosocial and emotional health aspects of their condition. Diabetes support groups, both online and off, have made my personal experience with type 1 diabetes more positive. You, too, can benefit from those connections. Whether it's exercise, diet, or emotional health hurdles, peers who understand what you're going through are a powerful resource for living well. But what exactly does peer-to-peer support provide, and how is it different from what I get from my doctor? Have you ever spied someone checking their blood sugar before eating lunch? Have you heard someone ask, "Is this soda definitely diet?" before they're willing to take a small sip to confirm? There is something intensely powerful about having one of those "me, too!" moments. They confirm that you aren't alone in your journey. When you see other people doing what you do and dealing with what you deal with, it can be so comforting. With that "me, too" moment comes emotional support. There's a lot of focus on numbers, like A1C, weight, and blood sugars, but there's more to diabetes than just the basic data. Living with a chronic illness comes with some emotional weight, which at times may be hard to carry all on your own. Reaching out to others who know what you're going through can make talking about your experience with diabetes easier. Your frame of mind needs to be in tip-top shape in order to manage your health, so don't be shy about asking for help when it comes to lifting the mental load. You will be better for it! Wit Continue reading >>

Joining A Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment

Joining A Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment

Joining a Support Group Improves Diabetes Treatment Patients who find a support group that "fits" are more likely to take their insulin or other diabetes medication over the long-term. Taking diabetes medicine on schedule, whether injecting insulin or swallowing a pill, can be annoying, and sometimes difficult. You know taking your diabetes mediation consistently means good news for your blood sugar, but follow up can be a problem as life gets in the way. Your doctor has probably nagged when havent been able to stick to your schedule for a dozen different reasons. Now there is something to make its easier and more likely that you can do better. Based on findings of a study presented at the World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease in Universal City, California, when you join a support programone that you ''click'' withit can help you manage your medication routine much better.1 It may also help you improve your diet, exercise and other behaviors that impact your diabetes management. And, you probably don't even need to leave home. In this study,1 men and women who were enrolled in an online support program were nearly twice as likely to take their medication as prescribed and less likely to discontinue it, says Timothy Reid, MD, a family medicine physician from Janesville, Wisconsin and senior author of the poster who presented the results of the study. Joining a support group assures better long-term care for people with diabetes. Dr. Reid examined the impact of a program called COACH on patients taking Toujeo insulin, but he says many other programs are offered to patients depending upon their needs and in all cases the support works, and not just for the medicine in the study.1 The idea, Dr. Reid says, is that patients who feel supporte Continue reading >>

Online Support For People Living With Diabetes

Online Support For People Living With Diabetes

Online Support for People Living with Diabetes Once a person is diagnosed with diabetes, they most likely will have the disease for the rest of their life if they are a type 2 diabetic, and definitely will if diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. In addition, it is generally up to the patient to manage their condition. Statistically speaking, even someone who sees a member of their health-care team every 3 months is managing (or not managing) the disease on their own more than 99% of the time. Unfortunately, diabetes is not something that can just be controlled simply by taking a pill everyday. A registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) can provide some nutrition support for people living with diabetes, but there are simply not enough RDNs to provide this service every week, year after year, to the 29 million people living with diabetes across the United States. Thankfully there are other options out there that can provide support to people with diabetes to help make what can be difficult behavior changes. Using online resources is one potential option for diabetics looking for support. In 2013, an estimated 83.8% of households owned a computer, and more than 74% reported having Internet service. In addition, a 2015 report by the Pew Research Center indicated that nearly two-thirds of Americans own a smartphone, which enables them to easily go online. The Internet can be very helpful in terms of discovering accurate information and helpful online programs. However, the Internet can also be equally harmful and/or expensive with false promises and inaccurate information, especially on sites that promote parting with money to purchase a product or service. Through social media outlets, bad nutrition and other fraudulent information can be spread quickly to large numbers of peopl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Support Groups: How To Find The Perfect One For You

Diabetes Support Groups: How To Find The Perfect One For You

Diabetes Support Groups: How To Find The Perfect One For You Haveyou ever felt overwhelmed by diabetes? On a bad day, it can seem impossible to get your blood glucose under control, no matter what you do. I feel you. To manage your condition well, there are just so many things you need to do from figuring out the foods you can eat, what to do when your blood glucose levels are high or low, and whether your exercise plan is really working. The learning curve for diabetes is reallysteep. But.. youre not alone! Your friends, family and healthcare team can be an important source of support and motivation. Its easier to cope with diabetes when you have a strong network of people supporting you. More importantly, other people with diabetes can make a big difference in your life too. Imagine being able to talk freely and share experiences with other people facing the same problems and issues that you are, and who understand what youre going through first hand. Thats something your doctor or nurse wont be able to provide, as knowledgeable as they are. What kinds of diabetes support groups are there? Generally, most support groups can be divided into in-person and online groups. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. Tech savvy & younger people often prefer an online support group, where they can ask questions which can be too embarrassing to bring up at an in-person session. Such groups are bridge geographies and are accessible from anytime and any location. Other people may be prefer an in-person support group, which often has strong ties to community resources and knowledge about local culture. It is also easier to build human relationships and connections from face-to-face contact. Diabetes support groups comes in all shapes and sizes. It only requires someone to take t Continue reading >>

Resources For Parents, Teens, And Young Adults

Resources For Parents, Teens, And Young Adults

Printed resources, support groups, and online forums can provide useful information and support at an often-stressful time of life. TRANSITIONS From Pediatric to Adult Health Care The National Diabetes Education Program has put together a number of materials to ease the transition from pediatric to adult care for teens with diabetes. Among them are a transition planning checklist, fill-in form summarizing a teen’s health status to be prepared by the pediatric team for the new adult care provider, and links to a wide variety of resources. To order NDEP publications by phone, call (888) 693-NDEP (6337). THE 411 ON DISABILITY DISCLOSURE A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities www.ncwd-youth.info/411-on-disability-disclosure National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability/Youth This downloadable workbook offers students and young adults with disabilities the opportunity to think about whether, when, and how to disclose a disability. Rather than tell them what to do, the workbook offers information and poses questions to help readers explore their personal attitudes and needs, as well as their options to disclose — or not — in various settings. STUDENTS WITH DIABETES www.studentswithdiabetes.com This is a growing network of support and interaction for young adults on college and university campuses. Check the Web site to see whether your student’s school has a chapter. If not, suggest that one be started! Type One Nationa This online support network sponsored by the JDRF has numerous groups for young people with Type 1 diabetes, teens, college students, and young adults, as well as a group for parents of teens. ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES American Diabetes Association Community The ADA’s online community boards provides a forum for adults with Type 1 diabe Continue reading >>

Extra Support For Diabetics: Online Support Groups

Extra Support For Diabetics: Online Support Groups

Extra Support for Diabetics: Online Support Groups The benefits of social support on physical and mental well-being have been widely documented by psychologists at UCLA, the University of Minnesota, and many other institutions. Support groups provide a valuable resource for social support, but not everyone feels comfortable in a public group setting. For some people, online support groups provide much needed social support. Support groups are great for those with diabetes, or whose loved ones have diabetes, because struggling with this condition can be challenging at best. Support groups provide a forum for people suffering from the same ailments to share personal experiences and offer emotional, moral and practical support. Participants in diabetes support groups understand the inherent difficulties in managing blood sugar levels, insulin injections and diabetic diets. People feel less isolated and judged while participating in a platform where they can discuss their feelings and anxieties. You may develop a clearer sense of what to expect with your situation by comparing notes with others. People can share basic management skills such as how to count carbs and successfully administer insulin injections. This exchange of ideas gives a great sense of empowerment and control over your diabetes! Online support groups, like the diabetes group on SupportGroups.com, are convenient for people who may not have the time or the means to attend in-person group therapy sessions. Online support groups also work well for people who may feel uncomfortable discussing their condition and their feelings about it in front of a group of strangers. Its easier to be honest and open about your experiences in an online setting. With diabetes, its polite to keep all personal information confi Continue reading >>

Group Support Tips For People With Diabetes

Group Support Tips For People With Diabetes

Find a Health Buddy Lori Bohall knew for years that she had insulin resistance. But that meant little to her until last year, when she began regaining weight she'd lost. Her feet ached, and she sank into depression. Her doctor said she had type 2 diabetes. An invitation from her health coach to join a diabetes class was the wake-up call Lori needed. The class provided a wealth of information, and she was inspired by others who talked openly about their experiences with diabetes. "Learning from others who have had success with managing their diabetes made me want to come on board and really get in the game," says Lori, 43, of Indianapolis. Lori also began to feel as if she owed it to the group to do her best at managing her health. "I find myself thinking about my class buddies as I work on my program each day," she says. "Knowing they are doing all it takes to be healthy inspires me." She's even made new friends through the group, including a walking buddy. It Takes a Village Getting together with other people with diabetes (PWDs) can make a big difference in how well you take care of yourself. Studies have shown that people who participate in activities with others have better control of blood sugars, better quality of life, and less depression than patients who don't. "The research about diabetes, and chronic illness in general, clearly indicates that support from others enhances self-care," says John Zrebiec, M.S.W., CDE, a clinical social worker at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and a member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. "Likely that is just a natural human response to being able to share the burden." Participating in a support group can help you: Feel connected. Identifying with a group relieves the feeling of isolation that often comes wit Continue reading >>

You Are Not Alone, Finding Support When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

You Are Not Alone, Finding Support When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, whether you just got the diagnosis or you have had the condition for months or even years, you may feel like you are alone or that no one else understands how it feels to live with this disease. These are not uncommon feelings, but you should know you are not alone and that there are places to turn for comfort and support and a shoulder to lean on when you need it. Is anybody out there? Yes, there are many people, groups, and organizations that are ready, willing, and able to offer comfort and help you with your questions and concerns about type 2 diabetes, as well as serve as a sounding board and a source of ideas for recipes, exercise tips, and how to tackle the challenges that the disease can throw in your path. Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes (90 to 95% of which are type 2), according to the US Department of Health and Human Services, and 18.8 million of them been diagnosed while about 7 million have the disease and don’t know it. Clearly you are not alone in facing the challenges of the disease: it’s just a matter of you taking the steps to find support. Here are some suggestions on where to turn to get comfort, help, and resources if you are dealing with type 2 diabetes. (A future article will focus on support for children and type 1 diabetes.) Enlist family and friends: Many people have family members and/or friends who have type 2 diabetes, and sharing information and tips with them may be a useful way to feel less alone. One way to approach the topic is to let the other person feel like he or she is being helpful. For example, you might ask a friend if she has some good recipes for type 2 diabetes, or if he has any experience taking supplements for controlling blood sugar levels. Although everyone’s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy...support Networks

Diabetes Advocacy...support Networks

"Few chronic conditions require as much vigilance as diabetes. Whether you're working at the office, relaxing by the fireplace or strolling on the deck of a Caribbean cruise-boat, diabetes follows you around like a hungry dog. Diabetes demands your attention day in and day out. You are required to balance your food intake with your exercise routine, to keep track of how much you ate and when you ate, to monitor your blood glucose levels, and possibly to take insulin..." The above was taken from Diabetes Dialogue in an article entitled Breaking Free of the Stress Zone by Gabrielle Bauer (Summer 2003, Volume 50 No. 2 Page 8). For us, it highlights why support is so very vital to all who have had this "hungry dog" move into their house. Support can be found in families, through diabetes teams, in local support groups, as well as online. www.childrenwithdiabetes.com offers mailing lists that support both parents, children, and teens as well as chat rooms that can be of great comfort, support, and information. Facebook , TuDiabetes and even Twitter offer many other great connections to the Diabetes Online Community (aka the DOC). InsulinPumpers.org An exceptionally informative site for those who are pumping insulin or looking to begin insulin pump therapy. Rufus and Ruby....the bears with Diabetes Support for children can also be found in various bears such as Rufus and Ruby who both provide comfort and help fund a cure. Rufus and Ruby, the Bears with Diabetes , have come to symbolize hope and support for those children living with Type 1 Diabetes. Created by a loving mother, Carol Cramer, after her own son was diagnosed with Type One Diabetes. Rufus and Ruby have patches where insulin should be injected, hearts on their paws for glucose testing, and a Medic Alert bracelet Continue reading >>

Seeking Support For Type 2 Diabetes

Seeking Support For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can seem overwhelming at times, but you can take control back. It helps to have people who encourage you and show you new ways to manage your diabetes day to day. Put them on your go-to list, and reach out any time you need their insight and motivation. You need a medical team that knows diabetes inside and out. They could include: An endocrinologist, who has a lot of experience working with people who have diabetes A pharmacist, who's familiar with all your medicines A registered dietitian, who can give you pointers on what to eat All of these professionals work with you to help you stay well. It helps to talk to someone who can relate to what you're going through, since they have diabetes, too. While support groups are not psychotherapy groups, they can provide you with a safe, accepting place to share your situation and get comfort and encouragement. Type 2 diabetes can affect the entire family. So get them, and your friends, involved. Share with them what you're going through and how you manage your diabetes. For instance, tell them why you have to check your blood sugar regularly, or what sorts of snacks and meals are OK for you. Want someone to help you get them up to speed? You might want to hold a family meeting, and invite your diabetes educator to answer their questions. You deserve to feel good emotionally. If you don't, you may want to talk to a therapist. In therapy, you'll plan positive ways to handle your diabetes. It's not just for people with conditions like depression or anxiety . Anyone can benefit. You can get a fresh point of view that helps you work through your challenges. That's important, because stress can affect your blood sugar levels . Look for a licensed mental health professional who works with people who have diabetes or Continue reading >>

Online Support Resources For People With Diabetes

Online Support Resources For People With Diabetes

Diabetes contributes to complications such as neuropathy and vascular disease, which often lead to limb loss. Getting support from other people with diabetes can help you better manage your condition and help you prevent complications in the future. The following are online support groups and forums for people with diabetes who wish to communicate with others sharing similar experiences. American Diabetes Association Message Boards community.diabetes.org/n/forumIndex.aspx?webtag=adaindex Diabetesbb.org diabetesbb.org Diabetes Care Group diabetescaregroup.info Diabetes Daily diabetesdaily.com/forum/?gclid=CNG6te_7j5UCFROA1QodnC8Mfw diabetes files diabetesfiles.com Diabetes Forums diabetesforums.com Diabetes Health Forums diabeteshealth.com/forums/general/general Diabetes Insight Support diabetes-insight.info dLife Forums dlife.com/diabetes-forum Joslin Diabetes Center Discussion Boards forums.joslin.org TalkDiabetes.net talkdiabetes.net Yahoo Health: All Diabetic International health.groups.yahoo.com/group/alldiabeticinternational It is not the intention of the Amputee Coalition to provide specific medical or legal advice but rather to provide consumers with information to better understand their health and healthcare issues. The Amputee Coalition does not endorse any specific treatment, technology, company, service or device. Consumers are urged to consult with their healthcare providers for specific medical advice or before making any purchasing decisions involving their care. National Limb Loss Resource Center, a program of the Amputee Coalition, located at 900 East Hill Ave., Suite 390, Knoxville, TN 37915 | 888/267-5669 © Amputee Coalition. Local reproduction for use by Amputee Coalition constituents is permitted as long as this copyright information is included. O Continue reading >>

How To Find Diabetes Support Groups

How To Find Diabetes Support Groups

Diabetics need information and support, and groups offer both.(ISTOCKPHOTO)Joining a community of people with diabeteseither an online or in-person versioncan provide you with a rich source of encouragement and information. Members can help you solve problems, suggest questions for your next doctor's visit, and get you through tough times. How one man found help online Paul Shirley felt better after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in December 2006. For years he'd been battling sinus infections and fatigue, which he now knows were issues related to the diabetes. He changed his diet and started taking medication. Then he aggravated an old shoulder injury, which required surgery and physical therapy. He started feeling terrible again and had difficulty controlling his blood sugar. Support Group"It's a spirit-lifting type of group" Watch videoMore about diabetes The 56-year-old Easley, S.C., resident wondered if it could be related to his injury. So he asked the members of a diabetes-related email group. Of course, they said: Being sick or injured can throw off your blood sugar. "You can't go to your doctor or even your diabetes educator every time you have a question. But you can go on this list, and people are glad to talk to you about it," he says. Although the support group members aren't experts, their "friendly, experienced" advice is sometimes all the help he needs. Shirley, who's working on his doctorate in psychology, notes that some people in online groups may argue or push unwanted advice on you. In that case, it's best to ignore them or privately email the moderator, the person responsible for maintaining order on the discussion board or email list. To find an online discussion board or email list, check out the American Diabetes Association, dLife, or Diab Continue reading >>

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