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United Hospital Fund - Together On Diabetes-nyc: A Community Control Project For Seniors

United Hospital Fund - Together On Diabetes-nyc: A Community Control Project For Seniors

Improving Health Care for Every New Yorker Aging in Place Together on Diabetes-NYC: A Community Control Project for Seniors Together on Diabetes-NYC: A Community Control Project for Seniors Together on Diabetes-NYC was, from 2012 to 2015, a community program in Washington Heights/Inwood designed to help seniors with diabetes to live well by gaining or maintaining control of their diabetes and minimizing the risks of serious complications. United Hospital Fund, with grant support from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, organized a wide variety of community partners in Washington Heights/Inwoodsenior service programs, health care providers, faith-based organizations, and businessesto develop this first-of-its-kind diabetes program specifically focused on seniors, a potential model for community-based programs that could be replicated in other neighborhoods. Together on Diabetes-NYC ultimately enrolled more than 1,600 seniors with diabetes from those two upper Manhattan neighborhoods. Once enrolled, seniors were connected to a variety of programs and services near their homes, including educational and support groups, cooking classes, individual coaching, and exercise classes. Together on Diabetes-NYC provided ongoing support to participating seniors to help them achieve their individual goals. Using a secure, private database, the program also monitored progress over time through the periodic assessment of self-care behaviors and disease management, as well as measuring participants perceptions of their overall health and quality of life. Over the programs lifespan, it documented improvements in practices essential to good diabetes management, including following a healthy diet and adhering to medication regimens. More important, these changes were found to be sustaine Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program (ndpp)

National Diabetes Prevention Program (ndpp)

Are You at Risk? Our interactive diabetes risk assessment test can help you determine if you are at risk of developing pre-diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with Diabetes, learn to manage it through workshops in the Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP). The Diabetes Risk test asks you to answer some questions about potential risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Your results are not saved in any way. The test takes less than a minute and could save your life! In this evidence-based year-long program, small groups of participants meet weekly with a trained Lifestyle Coach for a minimum of 16 weekly sessions in the first 6 months followed by a second 6 month period containing at least one session per month concluding the program in one full year. The year is focused on lifestyle change strategies that can help participants to lose small amounts of weight and increase physical activity to significantly decrease their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Sessions focus on healthy eating, increasing physical activity, and learning skills to maintain weight loss. This is a proven program for people with pre-diabetes or who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes and who are ready to make achievable and realistic lifestyle changes. The workshops The National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) lifestyle change workshop promoted and recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is an evidence-based program developed specifically to prevent type 2 diabetes. It is designed for people who have prediabetes or are at risk for type 2 diabetes, but who do not already have diabetes. A trained lifestyle coach facilitates the program and will encourage you to make some changes to aspects of your lifestyle, like eating healthier, reducing str Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association (ada): Greater New York Office

American Diabetes Association (ada): Greater New York Office

American Diabetes Association (ADA): Greater New York Office Our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. We lead the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fight for those affected - by diabetes. - We fund research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes. - We deliver services to hundreds of communities. - We provide objective and credible information. - We give voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. To learn more, visit www.diabetes.org/newyork An estimated 800,000 adult New Yorkers (almost one in ten) now have diabetes. Diabetes has increase 13% in New York City since 2002. In 2007, 18 of every 100,000 New Yorkers died from diabetes. The impact of diabetes hits Hispanic, Latino and African American New Yorkers even harder. Almost 20% of Latinos and Hispanics in the New York City market, and 18% of African American New Yorkers, have diabetes. In New York City during 2007, 22 African Americans and 23 Hispanics or Latinos of every 100,000 died from diabetes. That is why the American Diabetes Associations New York office is so committed to educating the public about how to stop diabetes and support those living with the disease. Contact us: 333 7th Avenue #1700 New York, NY 10001 Feria, the prominent Latino/Hispanic outreach program in the Greater New York City area is an outdoor community event held at St. Marys Recreation Center and Park, South Bronx, NY and is intended to reach thousands with the important message that they might be at risk for diabetes. This event serves as a kick-off celebration to Hispanic Heritage Month Learn how to live healthy, be active and change the future of diabetes for you and your family at the American Diabetes Association Expo. The EXPO isFREEand i Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Nyc Health + Hospitals

Diabetes | Nyc Health + Hospitals

We can help you live well with diabetes. We provide expert care and support to more than 60,000 New Yorkers with the disease. We also care for adults and children who are at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes is a disease in which there is too much sugar in the blood. Your body uses a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar. People with diabetes either do not have enough insulin or cant use the insulin well. Type 1: The body does not produce enough insulin. This form of diabetes affects children and young adults. Type 2: The body produces insulin but does not use it properly to control blood sugar. Most people diagnosed with diabetes have this form of the disease. More than 700,000 New Yorkers have diabetes, and nearly a third do not know they have it. Many people with diabetes have no symptoms. For others, symptoms may develop slowly over time or are so mild, they go unnoticed. Without proper care, diabetes can cause serious health problems like heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and amputations of the legs or feet. What can I do to reduce my risk for diabetes? Along with a family history of diabetes, being overweight and physically inactive are the biggest risk factors for developing the disease. Adopting a healthier lifestyle is one of the best things you can do to reduce your chances of developing diabetes: Eat a healthy diet and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity, such as walking, most days of the week. Get an annual check-up from your doctor. Click here to find a doctor in your neighborhood. Making healthier food choices and moving more are key to controlling your diabetes. The good news is that taking small steps to improve your health goes a long way when it comes to living well with diabetes: F Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs when a woman develops diabetes, or high blood sugars, during pregnancy. Pregnancy hormones block the action of the mother's insulin, which is a hormone needed to bring sugar from the blood into the body’s cells for energy. When insulin is not working properly, blood sugar rises in the mother and can transfer over to the growing baby, causing the baby to store the extra sugar as fat. The result is “macrosomia”, a term used to describe a very big baby. If a baby is too big, a mother may need a C-section to safely deliver the baby. ► Learn about Children and Diabetes Is gestational diabetes serious? Gestational diabetes can be serious if it is not controlled. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born, but in some women, the diabetes persists. It is important that a doctor checks the mother’s blood sugar 6 weeks after the baby is born. Once a woman has had diabetes during pregnancy, her chances are very high (2 in 3) that she will get it again if she becomes pregnant again. Also, many women with diabetes in pregnancy develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Diabetes is a serious disease that can affect the heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and feet. Children of women who have had gestational diabetes may also be at higher risk for gaining too much weight or getting diabetes in their teenage years. Who are the high-risk groups? Asians, especially South and Central Asian (over 1 in 10 pregnant women); Mexicans (1 in 20); and some Caribbean groups (1 in 20) Women over 35 years of age Women who are overweight or obese before pregnancy Women who have a family member with diabetes If I am pregnant, how do I know if I have gestational diabetes? Most doctors and midwives will screen women for gestational diabetes at 24-28 weeks. T Continue reading >>

Where To Turn For Help And Infoclinics, Support Groups & More

Where To Turn For Help And Infoclinics, Support Groups & More

WHERE TO TURN FOR HELP AND INFOCLINICS, SUPPORT GROUPS & MORE WHERE TO TURN FOR HELP AND INFOCLINICS, SUPPORT GROUPS & MORE For a long time, New York City had no centers dedicated to diabetes care; some physicians even referred patients to the renowned Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. That has changed. Six years ago, a Joslin Center opened its doors at St. Lukes-Roosevelt. Since then, Columbia-Presbyterian, Mount Sinai, Beth Israel and Montefiore have all added diabetes programs. The major programs in New York: Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at Columbia-PresbyterianRuss Berrie Medical Science Pavilion2nd floor1150 St. Nicholas Ave.(212) 304-5494 Beth Israel Medical Center, Diabetes Management ProgramFirst Ave. at 16th St.(212) 844-1448 Joslin Center for Diabetes at St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital Center425 W. 59th St.(212) 523-8353 Mount Sinai Medical Center Diabetes Center1200 Fifth Ave.(212) 241-2000 Montefiore Medical Center, Clinical Diabetes Center1575 Blondell Ave., the Bronx(718) 405-8260 The Diabetes Research & Training Center at Albert Einstein College of Medicine 1300 Morris Park Ave., the Bronx (718) 430-8800 FOR GENERAL INFORMATION American Diabetes Association1-800-DIABETESwww. org National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse(301) 654-3327www. htm National Institutes of Healths National Diabetes Education Program1-800-438-5383gov Centers for Disease Controls Diabetes and Public Health Resource1-877-CDC-DIABwww. gov/diabetes American Dietetic Association(312) 899-0040www. org Lighthouse International(vision rehabilitation)1-800-829-0500 www. org The Neuropathy Association(212) 692-0662www. org Commission on the Publics Health System (for insurance issues)(212) 749-1227html The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Call 1-888-THE-FEET for free brochure on f Continue reading >>

Campaign Against Diabetes

Campaign Against Diabetes

The purpose of the CUNY Campaign against Diabetes is to strengthen CUNYs capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes among students, faculty, staff and their respective family members. The Campaign will mobilize CUNYs teaching, research and service capacities to both improve the management and prevention of diabetes among the CUNY community. Why Do We Need the CUNY Campaign Against Diabetes? Diabetes is becoming an epidemic nationally and in New York City. To address this epidemic, the City University of New Yorks Urban Health Collaborative, a group of CUNY faculty and students from public health, nursing, nutrition, psychology, sociology and other disciplines joined with CUNY to develop the CUNY Campaign Against Diabetes , a five year plan to strengthen the universitys and the citys ability to bring diabetes under control. The Campaign is activating CUNYs unique assets: more than 200,000 students from the communities most affected by diabetes; professional programs, nurses, public health professionals and social workers; dozens of researchers already engaged in addressing the citys most serious health and social problems; and a mission to serve New York. The Campaign also provides a model for improving public health while increasing the educational and research capacities of CUNY. The diabetes epidemic and the associated epidemics of obesity and physical inactivity threaten public health, social justice, economic productivity, and the capacity of the citys hospitals and social service agencies to respond to current and emerging needs. More than 1 in 8 New Yorkers has diabetes and the citys rate is a third higher than the US rate. In the past 8 years, diabetes has doubled among adults in the city. The diabetes disparities between blacks, Latinos and whites are widening, worsen Continue reading >>

I'm Looking For A Diabetes Support Group Type Thing In Nyc. Does Anyone Know Of Any? I've Done Research On It, But Haven't Been Able To Find Any As Of Yet.

I'm Looking For A Diabetes Support Group Type Thing In Nyc. Does Anyone Know Of Any? I've Done Research On It, But Haven't Been Able To Find Any As Of Yet.

Download helparound app for FREE and ask your own questions I'm looking for a Diabetes support group type thing in NYC. Does anyone know of any? I've done research on it, but haven't been able to find any as of yet. Call American diabetes assoc and they can refer u. Also check out www.diabetessisters.org they have groups all over I do lots of volunteering for JDRF. we started an adult habg out type of thing two years ago. not much going on w it now tho I've heard good things about the JDRF Young Leadership Committee in NYC. Their main focus is helping fundraise for JDRF, but you meet a lot of people who become great supports. I'm part of the committee in Los Angeles and feel much more connected. Look into The Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel. I used to run a group there for young woman. They have a lot of different groups and activities for diabetics. Hi****I am a board member at Marjorie's Fund and the founder of Cure Thrift Shop in NYC. We are starting to host all sorts of support groups. I'm not sure of your age, but we have a group meeting this Wednesday for people in their twenties and thirties. You can message me for more info. Try diabetes sisters. They have PODS - part of diabetes sisters all over the place. If there's not one convenient to you, they can train you to start one. They are great. Continue reading >>

For Adolescents And Young Adults

For Adolescents And Young Adults

The shift from child-centered to adult healthcare can be a challenge for young people with diabetes and their families. Many patients graduating from pediatric care would receive no care at all until some adult problem, such as pregnancy or a complication, forced them into the adult healthcare system. At the Berrie Center, our goal is never to have this happen. The Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center has a special transition program for teens and young adults with diabetes, and their families, coordinated by a nurse practitioner specializing in this age group. A rite of passagemaking the shift to adult care We help teens and young adults to take over the responsibility for their own diabetes self-care, depending on when each individual patient is ready. We understand the big changes in a young adults life: moving away from home, going to college and starting a job. With these new demands, fitting in time for going solo with their diabetes management can seem daunting. But with time, the patients focus often shifts more toward relationships and settling into lifelong health behaviors. All teens and young adults are referred to the Transition Team. The team acts as the bridge from the pediatric to the adult care teams before and after the transition. Teens and young adults are seen individually, in groups, and communicate by email and online. Transition patients get to stay involved with the Berrie Center community by mentoring younger children or becoming camp counselors at our summer day camp program. Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Support Groups In New York

Children With Diabetes - Support Groups In New York

All are welcome to the Mom's Coffee support group the first Wednesday of every month at 9:45am in Manhattan. Gatherings are casual and centered around the challenges brought on by a loved one with juvenile diabetes. Whether you are a mom or dad with a child with juvenile diabetes, or are concerned about a close friend with juvenile diabetes, please join us. If you would like to attend an upcoming meeting or for more information, please contact Alka at [email protected] Parents of Diabetics ( www.parentsofdiabetics.com ) is for families in western New York. They hold a meeting or educational forum monthly at various locations and try to provide venues so that the young people with Diabetes can interact with each other, and so that their families can do the same. We try our best to make all the events affordable, if not completely free. Our monthly meetings are always free: we charge no dues. For more information, or to attend our next meeting, just call the Western NY chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at (716) 833-2873. The Sugar Free Gang is a support group for children with diabetes and their families that can help you learn more about diabetes from others who share the same daily challenges as you do. The group is coordinated by a group of Certified Diabetes Educators and includes over 125 families who are willing to share their experiences, their successes and advice on raising a child with diabetes. Support group for parents of children with diabetes meets the last Wednesday of each month, from 7 to 8:30PM, at the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation in Liverpool. For more information, call Christine Zippi at 453-9327 or e-mail Martine at [email protected] Continue reading >>

Looking For Nyc Diabetic Support Group

Looking For Nyc Diabetic Support Group

How do I find a diabetes support group near where I live? (New York City, specifically Manhattan, near Union Square, 14th Street, Stuyvesant Town. I'm looking to learn and share information about what works, what doesn't work, and general support and information from diet, exercise, medication....etc. Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. You just found the best diabetes support group in the world, right on this site. D.D. Family T2 dx 3/07, tx w/very lo carb D&E Met, bolus R You can ask at your local hospital. Michigan has a Diabetes Network website that lists a number of Michigan support groups--not sure if there is an equivalent org for NY. 'Veni, Vidi, Velcro' - I came, I saw, I stuck around. D.D. Family Type 2, control with diet/exercise, Metformin I agree with Triv, this site has been the most informative and supportive group I've ever been involved with. Having said that, and I hope you do stay with us and join in, you could probably find a local in-person support group through the ADA, or even through your doctor's office. One way of finding a diabetic support group besides checking with the local hospitals (which is an excellent place to start) is to do a Google search of Diabetic Associations like the American Diabetes Association that would have a list of support groups in the area. If I find any support group through the internet searching, I'll report back here. I live in a NYC suburb - so I can't imagine there not being one within a short distance from you. Continue reading >>

Support Groups | Northwell Health

Support Groups | Northwell Health

Questions? Contact Leora Rezak, LMSW at(516) 734-8816 Ongoing, open-ended groups for children who have lost a parent, sibling and/or caregivers Eight-week close ended groups for parents who have lost a child Questions? For dates and times, contactSusan Thomas, LCSW-R, FT at (516) 216-5194 or theDepartment of Social Work at (718) 470-3124. Please call the Department of Patient Care Management to confirm dates and for more information (212) 434-3060 Lenox Hill Hospital Patient Care Management Office 5-6pm, Patient Care Management Office (122 East 76 St, Level 3, Suite B) Please call for information or to register (212) 434-3993 Brain aneurysm support group: Circle of Friends The Circle of Friends support group offers education, support and resources for brain aneurysm survivors. Family members, caregivers and anyone else interested are welcome to attend. There is no charge for attending and refreshments will be served Group meets from 5:45pm - 7:00 pm at North Shore University Hospital's 9 tower - large conference room Tuesday, January 09, 2017 Topic:The Search for Quality of Life with a Brain Injury; Speaker: Merav Deguzman CBIS, MHA, Recreation Therapy at Glen Cove Hospital Tuesday, February 14 - Topic: Living life one day at a time Tuesday, March14- Topic: Open discussion; Speaker: David J. Chalif, MD, FACS, Director, Neurovascualar Surgery, NSUH, Co-Director, Brain Aneursym Center. Neuroscience Institute Tuesday, April 11- Topic: Holistic Nutrition; Speaker: Nicole Libretti, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Stroke Program Coordinator; North Shore University Hospital Tuesday, May 9- Topic: Paint night with Jodi's Gallery. All materials will be supplied, free of charge Tuesday, June13 - Topic: Mind, body and spirit Tuesday, September 12- Topic: Back into the workforce; Speak Continue reading >>

Support Groups | Nyu Winthrop Hospital

Support Groups | Nyu Winthrop Hospital

Call 516-663-8220 or email [email protected] Bariatric (Weight Loss) Surgery Support Group NYU Winthrop Hospital's Bariatric Surgery Support Groups are open to people who have had bariatric surgery and individuals who are considering the surgery. Surgical treatment and pre and postoperative issues are discussed in every meeting as well as extensive discussion on the special topic of the month. Family and friends are welcome. Are generally held on the first Wednesday of every month in the NYU Winthrop Community Outreach Center at 101 Mineola Blvd., Mineola from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. For additional information, call 516-663-3300 . Support group for adults who have lost a loved one. Forming a New Identity: Learning to Live by Myself - Lois's Story From Surviving to Thriving: Healing for Self and Others During and after a Disaster 12:00-1:30pm; Beginning Tuesday, February 21, 2017 12:00-1:30pm; Beginning Thursday, July 27, 2017 NYU Winthrop Research and Academic Center - Room G-022 Parking: 120 Mineola Blvd. Garage on 1st Street - east of Mineola Blvd. 6:00-7:30pm; Beginning Thursday, May 11, 2017 NYU Winthrop Research and Academic Center - Room G-05/06 Parking: 120 Mineola Blvd. Garage on 1st Street - east of Mineola Blvd. 6:00pm-7:30pm; Beginning Thursday, October 12, 2017 NYU Winthrop Research and Academic Center - Room G-022 Parking: 120 Mineola Blvd. Garage on 1st Street - east of Mineola Blvd. 12:00 noon-1:00pm;Beginning Tuesday March 7, 2017 Case Management Conference Room, HR Building 1st Floor 4:00pm 5:00pm, Beginning Thursday September 21, 2017 Registration is required. Please contact our Pastoral Care Department at 516-663-4749 or email [email protected] NYU Winthrop Hospital provides support for breastfeeding mothers. The Breastfeeding Support Gro Continue reading >>

Kids & Diabetes - Treatment & Care | Mount Sinai - New York

Kids & Diabetes - Treatment & Care | Mount Sinai - New York

Mount Sinais highly skilled physicians diagnose and treat infants, children, and adolescents with diabetes and endocrine disorders. We teach you, the families of these children, about managing your son's or daughters diabetes. We also work with pediatric endocrinologists to transition children from their pediatricians to adult services when appropriate. Children spend many hours in school. It is critical that you work together with your childs teachers and other school employees to keep your childs diabetes under control. You may want to start by meeting with your child's teachers and school nurse to discuss your child's needs before the school year even begins. You can bring pamphlets or information from this web site to provide an overview of diabetes and the warning signs of hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and other complications. You should also work with your diabetes educator and the school to create an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that details how the school will manage your child's diabetes. Symptoms and treatment for hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia Three main federal laws protect your child's rights: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504 for short) prohibits schools from refusing to administer medication, denying your child participation in sports or other activities, and denying credit due to absenteeism related to the child's condition. It also allows parents to work with schools to create a plan to accommodate the child's needs. The Americans with Disabilities Act prevents public schools and day care centers from discriminating against people with disabilities, including diabetes. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires that schools create an IEP to accommodate children with disabilities, including diabetes. If you a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Support Groups Connect Individuals With Diabetes

Diabetes Support Groups Connect Individuals With Diabetes

Lesley Hoffman Goldenberg was particularly frustrated with her blood sugars one afternoon and decided she was tired of going it alone. She'd lived with type 1 diabetes since she was 12 years old, but never attended a support group until she discovered ACT 1 Diabetes in New York City. "The other Type I girls gave me creative tips for managing blood sugars, exercise, site changes, and doctor visits, and it just made things easier." Lesley adds that while she adores her doctor, there are issues she feels more comfortable discussing with the group. "In our meetings, NOTHING is off limits! We talk about all things serious, hilarious, disgusting, sexual, and uncomfortable. It's one of the only times I actually feel good about being a Type I Diabetic." ACT1 Diabetes: a support group in New York Katie Savin came up with the idea for ACT 1 in 2008 as a college student because she too was feeling frustrated and alone. She says, "That first night we had 12 attendees." The peer run, women only group meets at the Beth Israel Hospital in Manhattan for an hour twice a month. Most of the members are between 18-35 years old, and Katie says the constant monitoring in a positive and socially constructive way is what makes the group so successful. Another important aspect of the program's success is that it's run by women with diabetes. "People often stick their heads in the door and look at me skeptically when I sat at the head of the table, and ask if I was a nurse or a doctor. As soon as I said no, that I was a diabetic too, their shoulders instantly relaxed," she says. "It's a place people can go without feeling judged." She believes a variety of interventions are important to diabetes care, and that the support and advice shared between group members increases member's motivation to Continue reading >>

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