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Diabetes Stories Type 2

Diabetes: Real Life Stories

Diabetes: Real Life Stories

Tweet This section of Diabetes.co.uk presents real stories from people with diabetes around the world. By understanding other people’s experiences, successes and failures, it is hoped that awareness about living with diabetes can be raised. The most powerful tool in fighting diabetes is information, whether this comes from medical experts or real-life tales from those who live with the disease. We interview a range of people with diabetes and present their real life stories. To feature your own story, please contact us. Diabetes Blogs Keep checking back for more real-life diabetes views and opinions. If you post about diabetes online or run a diabetes blog or web page and would like your blog or story featured, please let us know. Read the official Diabetes Blog. Read the musings of people with diabetes, real life stories and loads more on the blog. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as Continue reading >>

True Life Story: Type 2 Diabetes Facts

True Life Story: Type 2 Diabetes Facts

In this episode of True Life Story, Jimmie shares useful type 2 diabetes facts, as well as discusses how hereditary diabetes can be. In this episode of True Life Story, Jimmie shares her personal story of how she lives a full, creative life with diabetes. She includes useful type 2 diabetes facts, as well as discusses how hereditary diabetes can be. 00:06 My weight throughout my life has been like a roller coaster. 00:10 Sometimes I have three different sizes in my wardrobe. 00:20 As long as I'm busy being creative and 00:23 doing something that fulfills me, I'm not eating as much. 00:28 because that's the downsize 'cuz with the diabetes; you gotta eat the right things. 00:32 So, if I get too busy, I'll forget to eat. 00:35 Oh, I can lose weight, but then the sugar goes down too low. 00:40 So now I have to learn how to balance my life now. 00:49 Whatever, you have inside you that needs to come up and out comes out in colors. 00:55 And that's what my paintings is for me. 01:00 My gr, my mother, my father died from complications of diabetes. 01:06 Both my sisters have type 2 diabetes, I have type 2 diabetes, and 01:11 my granddaughter has type 1 diabetes. 01:23 And I was not ready to receive it at all. 01:35 And it was complications of diabetes. 01:41 I remember he showed me his, when his toes was cut off. 01:52 And I remember one time, the kids came back to tell me, 01:56 ma, grandma had us watching the line in the street. 02:02 She is driving down the street could not see what the kids in the car. 02:07 Making sure that she stayed on the right side of the line, 02:11 cuz she didn't want us to know that she was going blind. 02:16 So with all those things, that made me fight 02:20 because I didn't wanna see my limbs go away or anything else. 02:27 It's time for this, I c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Jeffrey's Story

Type 2 Diabetes: Jeffrey's Story

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. Though a type 2 diabetes diagnosis can be scary, it's possible to control blood sugar and lead a healthy life. Chicago native Jeffrey Lisitza shares his inspiring journey. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Jeffrey Lisitza, a native of Chicago, was a typical, healthy, 20-something guy. But by the time he had reached his early 30s, his health started to change. I was gaining weight consistently, I was always tired, and I was always thirsty, he says. These are very clear signs of type 2 diabetes . In fact, obesity is one of the largest risk factors for type 2 diabetes, which occurs when your body can no longer produce enough insulin or make use of the insulin it produces, often leading to high blood sugar levels. Diabetes has become a growing health problem in America and around the world 366 million people worldwide and 25.8 million Americans are living with the condition. Jeffrey is one of them. He received a type 2 diabetes diagnosis from his doctor in the early stages of his condition, and he immediately began diabetes treatment. However, his initial attempts to control his blood sugar proved to be relatively unsuccessful. For the first few years, I took my pills and went about my life, he says. But as time went on, my weight began to increase, and my diabetes became more and more out of control." What Jeffrey didn't realize is that diabetes cannot be Continue reading >>

Real T2 Diabetes Story

Real T2 Diabetes Story

When first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, many people naturally wonder how it will affect their lives and are concerned about the potential long-term complications. Understanding diabetes and the impact of activities such as eating, exercise, sick days and everyday life on your glucose levels is an important part of glucose management. By understanding the body's needs and learning how to keep blood glucose within recommended levels, it is possible to manage diabetes effectively. Through understanding how to control blood glucose levels, activities such as eating out, sleeping in on weekends, playing sports and travelling abroad for trips or holidays can still be enjoyed to the full. Read how other people with Type 1 diabetes and discover how they have found their way to better control and a better quality of life. Read More Patrick was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in his 60s. Aware of the possible long-term complications, he uses the MiniMed® 640G System^ with SmartGuardTM and no longer has to inject 8-10 times a day to control his condition. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

Narrator: Jeff Howard begins his day like most of us...with coffee and breakfast. But like more and more Americans, there's something he has to check before he can eat-- his blood sugar. Jeff has Type Two diabetes. His body has trouble using insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar. With the rise of obesity in America, Type Two diabetes is becoming a national epidemic. The CDC says 21 million Americans have it, another 41 million are at risk. Left unchecked, it can be fatal. Managed properly, it can be controlled. Jeff Howard : If a diabetic will learn--if they will just get the right encouragement-- the dietary planning and exercise program that they have may very well cause them to live longer and healthier lives than they would have if they'd never had diabetes. Narrator: Jeff was diagnosed at age 40. But instead of focusing on his disease, he ignored it. After all, he didn't feel sick... Jeff Howard : I tended to think I was bullet proof and invisible and those people who had complications from diabetes were somebody else. Narrator: Over the last twenty years, Jeff has watched his body slowly disintegrate. Circulatory problems have cost him part of his vision, and caused nerve and bony damage to his left foot... Narrator: And he's concerned about his heartmore than two thirds of people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke. Jeff Howard : It is an insidious disease that quietly consumes the human body to the point where you can't walk, can't see, can't function and ultimately can't live. So pay attention. Learn everything you can. Get some help and some support. But do it early on when you first discover you're a diabetic, before the damage insidiously takes over and it gets to the point where it's too late. Narrator: Jeff hopes it is not too late. Learn Continue reading >>

Stories Archive - Type2diabetes.com

Stories Archive - Type2diabetes.com

In Late August 2017, my pinky and ring finger started tingling; Constantly. I was thinking stroke? Pinched nerve? After it continued for several days, I started the process of registering with the... READ MORE I was diagnosed after surgery. The doctor told me that I was Type 2 Diabetic after having a partial hysterectomy. I suspected maybe the summer before when I was getting shots to... READ MORE Ive lived with the specter of diabetes my entire life. Its the family disease. Type 1, Type 2weve got it all. Skinny, fat, active, couch potatoit doesnt seem to matter. So when... READ MORE 2 yrs ago I found out I was type 2 diabetic. I never knew it till I went to Dr appointment and my a1c was 900 it was bad spent 2wks in... READ MORE Once I was at the gym and I felt my blood sugar getting low. I left Zumba and went to the locker room. Well, my blood sugar was apparently lower than I... READ MORE I am 68 years old and was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes about 20 years ago. Back in my 20s, I suspected diabetes and had a number of glucose tolerance tests done.... READ MORE Im 57 years old & I now know Ive been a type 2 diabetic for many years. The tell tale signs have been in place but no Dr ever caught them or... READ MORE I share my story on today because when I was a little girl I cherished when my birthday Feb 14 would come. I couldnt wait. I knew it meant boxes of chocolate... READ MORE My story begins with having type 2 diabetes. It began 25 years ago. It was so ironic, because I always believed that what you fear the most shows up in your experience.... READ MORE If anyone needs some hope or inspiration to get off insulin and Metformin here is my story. I was diagnosed type 2 on July 22, this year. Body was completely out of... READ MORE Continue reading >>

Real-life Stories: I Wasnt Ready For Type 2

Real-life Stories: I Wasnt Ready For Type 2

Real-life stories: I wasnt ready for type 2 Real-life stories: I wasnt ready for type 2 Lou Vickers-Willis explains how she overcame denial-betes- by Did you have any sense that you were unwell, before being diagnosed? There were signs, but I guess I didnt realise that I could actually feel better. I was eating an enormous amount of food. I would eat a full meal, then feel like I could eat the same again. I was always hungry and thirsty, too. I just put it down to working in hospitality and not getting normal meal breaks. Sometimes when I ate food, I had this weird sensation. It was like I could feel the food hitting my bloodstream. I also had this numbness in my two big toes for ages, but I thought it was probably because Im always on my feet at work, or maybe just that my shoes werent so great. But the day after I was diagnosed, I took my medications for the first time and the tingling stopped immediately. When did you start thinking that diabetes might be causing your symptoms? I didnt want to think about it at all. The first person to suggest that I might have diabetes was my foster mum, who is a nurse. I went to visit her at the end of 2009 and she thought I had pre-diabetes, or that maybe I already had diabetes. I didnt want to have diabetes, so I ignored her. I was a bit naive. About a year later, my partner noticed how much I was eating and drinking, and encouraged me to see a doctor. Well, not exactly. I didnt have any confidence in the first doctor I saw. They said I had type 2, but I decided to get a second opinion. Then, of course, the second doctor also said I had type 2. I very reluctantly said, Okay, I guess you must be right. Did you have any family history of diabetes? Im adopted, so that has always been an issue when Ive gone to doctors and theyve ask Continue reading >>

Angry For Change: A Type 2 Diabetics Diagnosis Story

Angry For Change: A Type 2 Diabetics Diagnosis Story

Most of us can remember the moment when we were diagnosed: we were at the doctors office; we were at the hospital; we were at home and got a phone call; etc Time just seemed to stop. We knew our lives were never going to be the same and we were scared. Im no different. Im just like you. Perhaps even more like you, than you think.I can tell you all about that dayOr was it that week? When did it all start?You see, I can tell you exactly how and when I was diagnosed, but I have a hard time pinpointing when it all started. I know I had been fighting chronic yeast infections an embarrassing situation which often leaves many wondering about ones own personal hygiene habits. The RN at the local clinic, annoyed at my continued return and my requests for more medications, gave me pamphlet upon pamphlet on how to care for, and avoid getting them and even my husband got treated, just on the chance he was passing the infections right back to me. When nothing else worked, the RN decided, on a hunch, to test the level of glucose in my urine. I remember she came back into the room, pale as a sheet. She really didnt seem comfortable telling me that my blood glucose was very, very high, and that I needed to visit with my PCP as soon as possible. So, I went out to lunch, had some Subway with my husband (unaware of the role of carbohydrates on blood glucose), went home sat on the sofa, while contemplating the Christmas tree, and then I fell asleep. Right on the sofa, and just like that. Like narcolepsy. I went over to see my PCP, after having paid for my own lab exams at the hospital. I was simply not confident the woman was going to take me seriously, nor investigate the matter further. My fasting blood glucose was 235 mg/dL, and my A1C was 10.5% And I was right. She looked at the numbe Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Patient Story Diabetes Your Stories Health Monitor

Type 2 Diabetes Patient Story Diabetes Your Stories Health Monitor

Today, Lori Lee is healthy, confident and successful. Yet, ironically, she credits her achievements to the very words that sent her into a downward spiral seven years ago: You have diabetes . Just 36 at the time, the single mother of three children (then ages 8, 13 and 15) learned the diagnosis after symptoms like dizziness, severe fatigue and a burning sensation in her feet landed her in the hospital. The news sent her reeling: I was never more petrified in my entire life." She started taking medication and headed back to her high-pressure job, but that wasnt enough. Her blood sugar skyrocketedhovering in the 400sdraining her energy and sapping her memory. Lori continued gaining weight and neglecting her diabetes until the day she had a heart-to-heart phone conversation with her mother. I was bawling my eyes out, telling my mother how sorry I felt for myself. And then she snapped, Enough! This person is not my daughterbecause my daughter is a fighter! Those words were Loris wake-up call. She made an appointment with a new doctor, and after being put on insulin, she met with a nutritionist who explained the importance of a healthy diet. One positive step led to another, ultimately leading Lori to tap into a passion: writing, something she had done over the years for enjoyment. I wrote poetry and romance novels for fun, she says, but I had never thought about it as a careeruntil now. The more she wrote, the more she felt her ailments disappear. Lori then found the courage to submit a manuscript for a childrens book to a publishing companyand it was accepted. Today, Lori is an author of childrens books, including Bonnie the Honeybee and the Case of the Butterfly Blues. Her kids are thriving, and her health is better than its been in years. Im working with my doctor dilig Continue reading >>

Stories & Experiences

Stories & Experiences

During National Diabetes Week July 12-18, we are asking people to share your stories about diabetes. You can post on our Facebook page or email [email protected] Below are a couple of stories that we have already collected: AFL player, living with type 1 diabetes Jack Fitzpatrick is living proof that you can achieve anything you want when living with diabetes. The 24-year old forward/ruckman for the Melbourne Football Club was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in June 2012, two weeks shy of his 21st birthday. The two metre tall man dubbed ‘The Fitz’ made his AFL debut in 2011. He believes that living with type 1 diabetes is an “interesting challenge” but that the right attitude and, in his case, playing footy help to lead a normal life. "It gives you something to look forward to and you don't wallow in self-pity,” says the Demons player. He checks his blood glucose levels during every game at quarter time and half time, making sure he doesn’t develop hypoglycaemia (‘hypo’, caused by low blood glucose levels). If left untreated, hypoglycaemia can lead to serious medical problems including loss of consciousness, convulsions or seizures requiring emergency treatment. He often involves his trainers in his diabetes management and jokes that they help keeping him alive. Since changing to a low carb/high fat diet and after a period of adaption, he was able to reduce his insulin intake. He now only injects long-acting insulin at night, instead of having needles at every meal. This has given him greater flexibility in his diabetes management whilst being able to train fully at high intensity, without losing strength. Jack is well aware of being a role-model for young people living with diabetes. “I really enjoy being able to tell them about my story Continue reading >>

Anthony Anderson's Diabetes Story | Get Real About Diabetes | Novo Nordisk Us

Anthony Anderson's Diabetes Story | Get Real About Diabetes | Novo Nordisk Us

My journey to getting real aboutdiabetes We all have our own diabetes story. The team at Get Real About Diabetes asked me about mine, and here it is. My journey to getting real aboutdiabetes We all have our own diabetes story. The team at Get Real About Diabetes asked me about mine, and here it is. When were you first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes? 2002. I had all the classic symptoms, excessive thirst, constantly going to the bathroom, etc. At one point I drank an absurd amount of water over a couple hours and I knew there was something going on. I didnt take it as seriously as I should have. I took the medicine my health care provider first prescribed, but I didnt commit to diet and being active like I needed to. I kept telling myself that Everything is good in moderation, which was just an excuse to keep eating what I wanted. What made you decide to get real about your diabetes? About 10 years ago my dad passed away from type 2 diabetes complications. That was really tough, especially knowing that if my dad had taken better care of himself, he might still be here. My dad just didnt know what happens when you dont take control of your diabetes. That was a real wake-up call for me. I didnt want to just be a memory for my family, I wanted to be there. So, I vowed right then and there that things would be different, that I would get serious about managing my diabetes. What changes did you make when you decided to get real? Man, I changed a lot. For me, I kind of needed a fresh start, to leave all my old ways behind. I had just moved to New York for a new gigand I decided, Ok, this is it. Its time for the new me. I started with my diet. Al Roker is a good friend of mine and he recommended his nutritionist to me. She helped me cut out unnecessary carbs and gave me an act Continue reading >>

Real-life Stories Of Diabetes Success

Real-life Stories Of Diabetes Success

How do you measure success? The December issue of Diabetes Forecast , the consumer magazine of the American Diabetes Association, features the personal triumphs of people with diabetes some of their stories may surprise you. Here are just a few: With a glucose meter tucked in his pocket, Jerry Nairn, 49, of Chandler, Arizona, completed his first marathon in 1998. Since then he has run a total of 44 marathons and two ultra-marathons despite having type 1 diabetes. A runner since junior high school, Nairns passion for long distances has grown so much so that he runs between 30 and 50 miles per week and travels across the country to participate in marathons. "Im more or less always training for a race, he says. I think in general it helps keep me healthy." Morris Older, 60, of Orinda, California, noticed his legs were numb and tingly a few years before he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy. He enrolled in a four week diabetes education course and was amazed by the things he learned both about diabetes and himself. We went over my diet and I was shocked, he tells Diabetes Forecast. I was somebody who thought I was eating really well. I was into natural foods. In six months, with the help of a diabetes-focused meal plan, exercise, and oral medications, Olders A1C dropped from 12.4% to 4.8%. For him, being successful is being able to live a normal, physically active, life like going out for a 23 mile hike. If I wasnt successful in managing my diabetes, I couldnt do that. Naomi Kingery of Simi Valley, California, was diagnosed with diabetes just as she was entering her teenage years. Today, at 19 years old, she has written and published a book about growing up with diabetes and its emotional ups and downs. Her book was inspired by a hospital stay where she met Continue reading >>

Running The (diabetes) Numbers: 4 People Share How A Type 2 Diagnosis Helped Them Take Charge Of Their Health

Running The (diabetes) Numbers: 4 People Share How A Type 2 Diagnosis Helped Them Take Charge Of Their Health

Every 19 seconds, someone in the U.S. learns they have type 2 diabetes. That’s three people every minute who face a dangerous road ahead: If left unchecked, diabetes can lead to heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, blindness—and even death. One of the toughest things about managing diabetes is that it’s not a pop-a-pill-and-forget-about-it disease. It requires routine monitoring of blood glucose levels, along with diet and lifestyle changes to keep other core health indicators—blood pressure, cholesterol and weight—in check. Daunting for sure, but it’s certainly doable. And it starts with giving your diabetes digits some TLC. In fact, that’s the premise behind Imagine: Loving Your Numbers, a campaign and website aimed at helping people with type 2 diabetes better manage their condition. There’s even a quiz you can take to show you how, based on your personality and daily habits. From an avid athlete to a woman with a family history of the disease, just look at these four patients who successfully took charge of their numbers. “I Didn’t Think You Could Be Fit—and Have Diabetes” When Art Cutting turned 50, he bought an $1,100 bike—“a midlife-crisis purchase triggered by the fact that I looked like an Oompa Loompa,” he says. With that purchase, he soon became an avid cyclist and even completed endurance rides, like the 200-mile Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic. So when a blood test revealed that his LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol levels, which should be under 130, were over 600, he wasn’t overly concerned. But then Cutting, a college instructor based in Federal Way, WA, started to struggle with fatigue. His doctor gave him an A1C blood test, which provides information about average blood glucose levels. Cutting’s was nearly 12%; a heal Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetes can vary greatly from patient to patient. What were your symptoms at the onset of your disease? I had back pain, kidney infections, yeast infection, night sweats, and insomnia. I thought I had a kidney infection, but a new doctor at the clinic suggested an A1C test and it turned out my blood sugar was in the 200s that morning. Here we are and I have diabetes. I am a young man of 45 years now and I have been confirmed to have diabetes. Now I am having lots of symptom like weak erection, weakness of the body, dry lips and palms, and even restlessness in the legs and shrinking of my general body build ups. My head is itching very much now. I am 62 years old now. Since last 2 months glucose level in early morning is about 135 and after food glucose levels are about 115. Early morning my left leg and hand slightly painful. I had no symptoms, I was hypoglycemic for years, then about age 75 developed type 2 diabetes. I lost about 55 lb., and have controlled it with medication. A1C stays about 6.2, have presently had trouble with kidney infections and high blood pressure. When I got diabetes at 22 I had weight loss, no energy and was thirsty all the time. I also could not eat and was never hungry. I am 35 years old and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last summer. I took generally good care of myself and exercised on a regular basis. For at least the year before, I noticed that I had to urinate all the time, waking me up several times a night. In the month or so prior to being diagnosed, I lost 40 pounds and was thirsty all the time. One day I got extremely sick, could not keep anything down, had blurry vision, a rapid heartbeat, and began hyperventilating. My blood glucose level in the ER was in the high 500s and my A1C was 9.7. Since then, I have de Continue reading >>

Stories Of Success

Stories Of Success

With American Diabetes Association Alert Day® taking place tomorrow, March 27, we thought we’d share some inspirational stories of people who learned their risk for or were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes — then took steps to take control of their health. —————————————————————————————————————– Name: Leanne Steele Age: 31 Location: Trussville, Ala. In 2008, when I was 18 weeks pregnant with my first child, my doctor decided to test me early for gestational diabetes. At every appointment I was “spilling sugar” in my urinalysis. I failed the first glucose test so badly there wasn’t a need for a follow-up test—I had gestational diabetes. I met with the hospital’s diabetes educator and immediately began following a diabetes-friendly diet. However, diet alone could not keep my blood glucose within a healthy range. I was put on two types of insulin injections, fast-acting and long-release. The next five months were frustrating and disheartening. No matter how diligent I was with my diet or with testing and administering my insulin, I continued to have high blood glucose. But in the end, my hard work paid off, because my son was born perfectly healthy. I was aware that I was at risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life because of my gestational diabetes (I also have a family history of diabetes). In December 2010 I went for my yearly checkup, which included an A1C test. My doctor was quite impressed with the work I had put in over the last year. I had begun running and practicing hot yoga and had lost 35 pounds of baby weight. I was also training for my first half-marathon. I was in the best shape of my life! But a few days later the diabetes educator called with the results of my A Continue reading >>

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