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Diabetes Stories Of Symptoms

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

Patient Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetes can vary greatly from patient to patient. What were your symptoms at the onset of your disease? I had back pain, kidney infections, yeast infection, night sweats, and insomnia. I thought I had a kidney infection, but a new doctor at the clinic suggested an A1C test and it turned out my blood sugar was in the 200s that morning. Here we are and I have diabetes. I am a young man of 45 years now and I have been confirmed to have diabetes. Now I am having lots of symptom like weak erection, weakness of the body, dry lips and palms, and even restlessness in the legs and shrinking of my general body build ups. My head is itching very much now. I am 62 years old now. Since last 2 months glucose level in early morning is about 135 and after food glucose levels are about 115. Early morning my left leg and hand slightly painful. I had no symptoms, I was hypoglycemic for years, then about age 75 developed type 2 diabetes. I lost about 55 lb., and have controlled it with medication. A1C stays about 6.2, have presently had trouble with kidney infections and high blood pressure. When I got diabetes at 22 I had weight loss, no energy and was thirsty all the time. I also could not eat and was never hungry. I am 35 years old and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last summer. I took generally good care of myself and exercised on a regular basis. For at least the year before, I noticed that I had to urinate all the time, waking me up several times a night. In the month or so prior to being diagnosed, I lost 40 pounds and was thirsty all the time. One day I got extremely sick, could not keep anything down, had blurry vision, a rapid heartbeat, and began hyperventilating. My blood glucose level in the ER was in the high 500s and my A1C was 9.7. Since then, I have de Continue reading >>

Your Stories In Brief

Your Stories In Brief

We have lots of short stories you've been sending us. You can read them below – and there are even morehereandhere! Why not write your own story andsend it to us? Kelly I was 13 when I was diagnosed with diabetes, I am 16 now. I was ill for about a month before being admitted to hospital. During that time I had painful headaches from being dehydrated and was constantly sleeping and drinking gallons of water. When I got to the hospital i was unsure of where I was and what was happening to me, I was scared and panicking about not knowing why everyone is about you. Once I knew that i had diabetes I was confused asking myself questions like why me? I spent nine days in hospital learning about the things that are going to keep me alive. Since been diagnosed with diabetes, I have been in and out of hospital over 10 times because I find it difficult to control my blood sugar. No one in my family have diabetes so I feel like am trapped inside a bubble having no one to talk to during the times that i find hard. I find ways to keep track of my diabetes but give up so easily. I left school at 14 feeling to embarrassed and ashamed of what people think of me now that I have to do injections, but am starting to take control of my diabetes and i just want everyone to know that you should feel proud of who you are! Hayley My mum has Type 1 diabetes since i don't know when so always had a 50/50 chance of it being passed on. As a young child I was always chubby (my grandad didn't help buying sweets and cakes every morning). It come to April 2000, I had been showing signs of diabetes, extreme thrist, weeing LOADS! You know the usual signs so my mum took me to the doctors to have me checked for it. My test results come back negative, phew!. A week later 9th April 2009, I was suddenly hit Continue reading >>

Viewer Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms And Signs

Viewer Comments: Diabetes - Symptoms And Signs

Viewer Comments are not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on eMedicineHealth. The opinions expressed in the comments section are of the author and the author alone. eMedicineHealth does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment. If you think you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. This is a brilliant article and I have learnt more in the last 20 minutes reading it than in the three months since being diagnosed. I am 54 years old and thought I had bad flu virus and went to the doctor. He sent me for blood tests. He found I had type 2 and high blood pressure. I have been off work for three months and I am feeling better. I am a 66 year old male and in good health, at least I thought so until I was diagnosed with Type II diabetes. My first signs that I might have something wrong came after playing golf on a really hot day. We finished playing around 3:00pm and while sitting around waiting for food I experienced a cold sweat and lightheadedness. I was told to lie on the floor, a doctor in the room took my pulse and asked a few questions and I began to feel better. EMS was called and they checked me out but did not find anything, really. I felt better after eating. I went to the doctor who did some follow up with a cardiologist who said my blood sugar was a little elevated and my blood pressure and cholesterol needed attention. At this time, I noticed that I was getting really thirsty, and of course urinating frequently. I chalked this up to old age. A few weeks later the same thing after another golf outing. At this point I knew that something was am Continue reading >>

Getting The Diagnosis: Jens Story

Getting The Diagnosis: Jens Story

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney It wasnt just hot that summer it was, literally, the hottest summer I could remember. Thats why it didnt seem TOO weird that James was so very thirsty. It seemed very logical to me! I remember looking at James and thinking that he didnt look quite right. He seemed a little bit pale, sluggish and distracted. But then I also remembered my pediatricians guidelines on when to bring your child to the doctor. Like many first-time parents, when James was an infant I brought him in for every little sniffle. The pediatrician set me aside and said, If he has a high fever that wont come down or persists for several days, or if he cant keep anything down and seems dehydrated, or if he is having trouble breathing, or if he is very lethargic then bring him in. Those were her guidelines. And that July (although I was a bit thrown by lethargic), I wasnt sure he really qualified. But then things started getting really inconvenient. Soon, it wasnt JUST the constant drinking and frequent daytime potty incidents the NIGHTS became horrendous. It was during a midnight sheet change that I noticed something peculiar about James room. His urine smelled sweet. It was two oclock in the morning and I googled sweet urine. Every single reference pointed to diabetes! The very next day I called the pediatrician for an appointment and secured one the last appointment of the day. When I finally saw the nurse, I indicated that I thought that James might have diabetes. She decided to do a blood sugar reading. This young nurse poked his finger and put the blood onto the large test strip. When the results flashed, her face turned white and she left without a word. Moments later the doctor appeared and told us in no uncertain terms that James had diabetes and that h Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes (also called diabetes mellitus type 2) is the most common form of diabetes. Insulin is not required for survival in type 2 diabetes. That is why they used to call it non-insulin dependent diabetes. Insulin resistance is the main problem in type 2 diabetes. It means that your body can’t use insulin effectively. You still make insulin but it is less effective. So, you need more insulin to do the same job. Without effective use of insulin, you blood sugar levels go up. That is what happens in type 2 diabetes. (They don’t call it non-insulin dependent diabetes anymore to avoid the perception that insulin has nothing to with type 2 diabetes.) Many type 2 diabetes patients need insulin to effectively treat high blood sugars because their bodies do not make enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. Type 2 Diabetes symptoms Type 2 diabetes symptoms develop very slowly. You may already have diabetes, but may not even have the first signs of diabetes for many years. Here is the list of 10 classic diabetes symptoms: Frequent urination Excessive hunger Excessive thirst (dry mouth) Unusual weight loss Extreme fatigue and irritability Frequent infections Blurred vision Cuts/bruises are slow to heal Tingling numbness in the hands or feet Recurring skin, gum or bladder infection If someone asks you, “What are the symptoms of diabetes?”, this list makes it easy to answer the question. However, the list of 10 diabetes symptoms does not help people figure out if they have diabetes. Many patients with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms for many years. When they finally have classic diabetes symptoms, they already have complications of diabetes. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes symptoms Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes leads to many complicati Continue reading >>

10 Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

10 Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90 percent of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. 15 Celebrities with Type 2 Diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Stories? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diagnosis Stories? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hello, I'm Sarah. I'm 13 and was wondering if this could start off a conversation of our different experiences with being diagnosed with Diabetes! Feel free to comment or message me if you are interested in mine novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member I'm 30 now and was diagnosed when I was 15....... looking back I can remember being really tired all the time and thirsty, going to the toilet and emptying what felt like litres, then immediately getting thirsty again, downing litres of water, milk, anything really....... at the time though I didn't really think anything was up..........my parents knew what was going on though as my younger brother, who was 14 months younger than me was diagnosed at 2 years old. My parent took me to hospital and they done some tests and it was confirmed, although I never actually heard the word 'you are type 1 diabetic' from the doctors or my parents......... I went through al the phases as clear as day...........denial, anger, sadness........ was kept in for a week and then let out into the big bad world.......... control wasn't the best for most of my teens and early twenties, due to being on a mixed insulin and just lifestyle choices........ now on the pump I have the tools to get good control most of the time.... I think even back then the diagnosis wasn't as bad as it would of been for my brother back in the 80s....... hi! I'm 12 years old and got diagnosed in May 2013. It was horrible! i just got iller and iller and iller. So my Nanna took me to the doctors and they said i had tonsillitis. they gave me some antibiotics which i threw up (was sick). my mum took me back to the doctors about a week later to see my actu Continue reading >>

My Diagnosis Story Campaign | Diabetic Connect

My Diagnosis Story Campaign | Diabetic Connect

I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in July 2010 at 21 years old, so I've had it for almost a year & a half. I was living without knowing I had it for about 4 months. I remember it was my 2nd semester as a junior in college and I was extremely stressed with finals and other problems. I wound up loosing 20 pounds. Everyone would ask how I lost so much weight & I would say I have no idea but I'm eating just as much as I normally do! I had a terrible diet, I hated vegetables and would constantly eat candy, cake and bread. Besides loosing all that weight, I was always thirsty (thankfully I would drink diet drinks or water for the most part) I was barely sleeping because I would be up all night using the bathroom and I was ALWAYS tired. I specifically remember walking to my job (about 10 blocks in NYC) and I did this all the time but I began getting tired half way and having to take a break or I would wind up taking the train. I knew something was wrong, but had absolutely no idea that it was diabetes. I wound up getting blood work done & having to go straight to the hospital until my sugars were controlled. This was a very emotional time in my life, I didn't know how I would cope and it has taken a lot, but I have adjusted a lot and changed all of my eating habits. I go to The Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at Columbia University and they have been so wonderful and helpful. They offer various classes here and also give you a diabetes educator/nutritionist, which is so helpful. I really love it there! Although I have my days were Im aggravated with having to live this lifestyle of worrying & needles & diets, I know things could be much worse and am focusing on keeping myself healthy. My Doctor diagnose my type 2 Diabetes at age 52 with no family record of diabetes, I was stu Continue reading >>

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (It Could Save a Life) By: Rachelle Stocum / Blog Parents of children with diabetes will hear this question asked a million times. And each time you tell your story the story gets shorter and shorter. You begin to leave out details. Details that may one day save another child’s life. I wrote this for a couple of reasons. The first reason was to document the details and help other families who are searching for answers to unexplained symptoms. The second reason was to really get my emotions off my chest, and reflect. December 30, 2016 is a day I will never forget. This date will now be forever know to us as Carter’s “dia-versary.” This was the day my seven year old son Carter was diagnosed with Type one Diabetes. I still tear up when I say or even write those words… my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. The week before Christmas my son Carter had so many complaints. He’s not a whiny kid by any means so this was unusual for him. He’s actually the most compliant child I know. When I ask him to do something he does it. So when he first complained of a stomach ache I thought he was coming down with the flu. It seems reasonable that a child would get sick in December. So I tried to wake him up but it was really hard. He was groggy and didn’t want to wake up. Once he was finally woke up I told him that I didn’t want him to eat anything until I was able to get grandma’s monitor and test his blood sugar. He drank some water but understood what I was asking of him. He didn’t complain or cry even though he was hungry. I knew that was bad because when I was pregnant with him I had gestational diabetes. My blood glucose only ran about 120 from what I can recall, and I knew normal was around Continue reading >>

The Mysterious Symptoms Of Undiagnosed Diabetes: Diabetes Blog Week Day 1

The Mysterious Symptoms Of Undiagnosed Diabetes: Diabetes Blog Week Day 1

“Let’s kick off Diabetes Blog Week by talking about the diabetes causes and issues that really get us fired up.” Before my husband, Mike, was diagnosed with diabetes, he was – to my mind – a certified tough guy. He’d been a paratrooper, had a black belt in some kind of kickboxing/karate thing that I (clearly) know nothing about, and he ran long distances. Whenever I was with him, I felt safe and protected, kind of like having a husband and a Rottweiler all rolled into one. (The previous sentence is intended as a compliment.) And if you’d asked me to come up with a thousand adjectives to describe Mike, “weak” would not have made the list. But then one day he got sick. We’d been in Atlanta with our baby for Mike’s cousin’s wedding, and had to cancel our flight home because Mike said he was too sick to fly. I had never heard Mike say there was something he couldn’t do. In fact, just a year earlier we’d been in Paris together and the night before our flight home, Mike got food poisoning from a dish of raw sea slugs. (There must be a sexy way to say sea slugs in French.) We had just a few hours between the dinner and our flight home, and Mike felt stomach cramps so severe, he was doubled over in pain. I suggested we stay an extra night in Paris until he felt better. He would hear nothing of it. When it was time to go, he pulled himself together, carried all the luggage, and off we went. He was not about to have his butt kicked by slimy sea slugs, and though he felt utterly horrid on the inside, you couldn’t tell on the outside. So when Mike said he was too sick to fly home after his cousin’s wedding, you can probably imagine how shocking his statement was, especially since no one could see his sickness. He didn’t have a fever and though he d Continue reading >>

Lee: 'undiagnosed Diabetes Nearly Killed Me'

Lee: 'undiagnosed Diabetes Nearly Killed Me'

Lee, a young slim guy, on the dangers of ignoring the symptoms of diabetes. There are two popular myths about diabetes. One is that it is caused by obesity and doesn't affect slim people. The other is that it's not serious because it can be managed with diet or injections. Neither are true. Ignoring the symptoms of diabetes is very dangerous - as 35 year old Lee found out. There's more about the symptoms in our Diabetes FAQs. This is Lee's story. I had all the classic symptoms - weight loss, thirst, thrush but I did nothing about it. I did not like going to the doctor so I would just put it off. I was divorced in 2003 and lost a lot of weight so put it down to stress. I started to drink a lot as I was newly single again, so that took care of the thirst! I remember not feeling too well but as I was partying a lot I would just put it down to hangovers, and the thrush, well, I did not want to see anyone about that... I thought I had caught something and did not want to know. This carried on for about a year or so then levelled out. It just became the normal thing - I stayed slim, didn't exercise and drank heavily. I had erection problems Fast forward, I started getting erection problems. Again, I was too embarrassed to see anyone and put it down to the drink. I was having diarrhoea, started losing more weight, feeling very tired. I was always drinking water, my mouth was very dry, I was urinating all the time, I then had a rash start on my legs that did not go away. I was embarrassed and maybe I did not want to know what was wrong. I then had a boil on my left leg and within a couple of days two more appeared. I was feeling very poorly and couldn't go to work. Then one day I could not get my breath and an ambulance was called and I was rushed to hospital. It was May 2007 a Continue reading >>

That’s How We Found Out...

That’s How We Found Out...

One of the questions we get asked most is, “how did you know?”. Interestingly, I’ve never met a parent of a child with type I that hasn’t told me their 'diagnosis' story. It seems to be a right of passage. I’ve avoided telling our story on the site so far... But today I think I’m ready to share. Arden turned two years old on July 22nd 2006. A few weeks later she had her two year well visit with our pediatrician. Everything looked great, she got her immunizations and we went home. The next day Arden seemed sick, she had a slight fever and was lethargic, I assumed that was from the inoculations. When she didn't get better after a few days I took her back to the doctors office. Arden was then diagnosed with Hand, Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD). A common illness for infants and small children. What was strange about the diagnosis was that she already had HFMD previously and it’s supposed to be one of those things you get once and then build a natural defense against, like chicken pox. I was really hoping she would start feeling better fast because we were leaving for a family vacation in three days and I wanted Arden to be able to enjoy the beach. Arden had been urinating more then usual for about a week, not in frequency but volume. I attributed this to her recent switch from bottles to cups, as she was drinking more and it just seemed to make sense. The next day I realized that I couldn’t remember when her last bowel movement was. Later that day she finally had one but it was dry, actually crushable, like dirt that was barely held together by moisture. That is when I started to really worry, I called the pediatrician and we agreed that she was dehydrated from being sick and that I’d begin to push liquids. This moment is the first time I failed as Arden’ Continue reading >>

Angry For Change: A Type 2 Diabetics Diagnosis Story

Angry For Change: A Type 2 Diabetics Diagnosis Story

Most of us can remember the moment when we were diagnosed: we were at the doctors office; we were at the hospital; we were at home and got a phone call; etc Time just seemed to stop. We knew our lives were never going to be the same and we were scared. Im no different. Im just like you. Perhaps even more like you, than you think.I can tell you all about that dayOr was it that week? When did it all start?You see, I can tell you exactly how and when I was diagnosed, but I have a hard time pinpointing when it all started. I know I had been fighting chronic yeast infections an embarrassing situation which often leaves many wondering about ones own personal hygiene habits. The RN at the local clinic, annoyed at my continued return and my requests for more medications, gave me pamphlet upon pamphlet on how to care for, and avoid getting them and even my husband got treated, just on the chance he was passing the infections right back to me. When nothing else worked, the RN decided, on a hunch, to test the level of glucose in my urine. I remember she came back into the room, pale as a sheet. She really didnt seem comfortable telling me that my blood glucose was very, very high, and that I needed to visit with my PCP as soon as possible. So, I went out to lunch, had some Subway with my husband (unaware of the role of carbohydrates on blood glucose), went home sat on the sofa, while contemplating the Christmas tree, and then I fell asleep. Right on the sofa, and just like that. Like narcolepsy. I went over to see my PCP, after having paid for my own lab exams at the hospital. I was simply not confident the woman was going to take me seriously, nor investigate the matter further. My fasting blood glucose was 235 mg/dL, and my A1C was 10.5% And I was right. She looked at the numbe Continue reading >>

Stories & Experiences

Stories & Experiences

During National Diabetes Week July 12-18, we are asking people to share your stories about diabetes. You can post on our Facebook page or email [email protected] Below are a couple of stories that we have already collected: AFL player, living with type 1 diabetes Jack Fitzpatrick is living proof that you can achieve anything you want when living with diabetes. The 24-year old forward/ruckman for the Melbourne Football Club was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in June 2012, two weeks shy of his 21st birthday. The two metre tall man dubbed ‘The Fitz’ made his AFL debut in 2011. He believes that living with type 1 diabetes is an “interesting challenge” but that the right attitude and, in his case, playing footy help to lead a normal life. "It gives you something to look forward to and you don't wallow in self-pity,” says the Demons player. He checks his blood glucose levels during every game at quarter time and half time, making sure he doesn’t develop hypoglycaemia (‘hypo’, caused by low blood glucose levels). If left untreated, hypoglycaemia can lead to serious medical problems including loss of consciousness, convulsions or seizures requiring emergency treatment. He often involves his trainers in his diabetes management and jokes that they help keeping him alive. Since changing to a low carb/high fat diet and after a period of adaption, he was able to reduce his insulin intake. He now only injects long-acting insulin at night, instead of having needles at every meal. This has given him greater flexibility in his diabetes management whilst being able to train fully at high intensity, without losing strength. Jack is well aware of being a role-model for young people living with diabetes. “I really enjoy being able to tell them about my story Continue reading >>

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