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Diabetes Stomach Aches

Stomach Aches And Diabetes: What Gives?

Stomach Aches And Diabetes: What Gives?

There’s a lot to consider with chronic stomach pain, but please digest this—stomach aches aren’t normal. Stomach irritation complaints are seemingly easy for healthcare providers to brush aside as insignificant. “Many patients go undiagnosed and undertreated because the gastrointestinal tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications,” Clinical Diabetes tells us. And with 75 percent of all people visiting diabetes clinics complaining of gastrointestinal issues, there’s a common malady at hand. Diabetes and the Gut Diabetes is a complex condition that has the potential to wreak havoc on organs, including the bowel. The length of your diabetes diagnosis and how often your blood sugars are at a normal level impact bowel disease. Healthcare providers are very tuned into exterior neuropathy and checking a patient’s feet because they are visible and measureable. When it comes to the bowel, it can be another story. The bowel is just as vulnerable to neuropathy, but it’s not easily seen or tested—every action in this area is invasive, meaning doctors must use instruments to look into your body. Neuropathy in the gut can slow down or speed up motility, the normal rate of contractions in the gut, resulting in gastrointestinal upset. People with diabetes who are prone to stomach neuropathy have also been linked to a higher incidence of autoimmune gut diseases, and like it or not, autoimmune disease breeds more autoimmune disease. When a patient mentions diabetes and gut symptoms, providers should pay attention. Identifying the Culprit In order to get the best treatment possible, it’s necessary to identify the culprit. In the case of celiac disease, for example, the best remedy is actually diet. Once irritating gluten is removed f Continue reading >>

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

If you have “gut issues” – meaning diarrhea, constipation, cramping, abdominal pain or nausea – and you have diabetes, you are not alone. In fact, this relationship is more common than you – or your doctor – may realize. Up to 75% of people with diabetes have at least one gastrointestinal symptom. These GI problems can include diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The most common GI problem that results in diarrhea is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and the links between gut problems, namely IBS and blood sugars are tightly woven and interconnected. Even the severity of symptoms is closely linked to the glycemic control of the individual. Meaning the worse the glycemic control, the worse the GI symptoms. High blood sugars make it hard for the stomach and small intestine to work normally. At the same time, IBS itself can make it harder for your body to control post-prandial (or “after meal”) blood sugars. A Missed Diagnosis and Continued Suffering Sadly, people with diabetes suffer from the effect of undiagnosed IBS or other digestive disruption every day. Some people with diabetes are told their abdominal pain and gastrointestinal discomfort is just a complication of their poorly controlled blood sugars—leaving Irritable Bowel Syndrome (or other digestive disorders) undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. To complicate matters further, symptoms of both diabetes and IBS are greatly impacted by diet, stress, and general health. In diabetes, GI problems are often related to what’s referred to as autonomic gastrointestinal neuropathy resulting in abnormal motility. “Motility” refers to your body’s ability to move through the digestive system – including your stomach, small and large intestine at the right speed: not too fast, not to Continue reading >>

What Is

What Is "diabetic Stomach"?

My niece takes an oral medicine for diabetes. At least once a week, she throws up at night. The doctor calls it "diabetic stomach." I have never heard of this, and I have had diabetes for 36 years. What could be the cause of her stomach problems, and what foods may be causing flare-ups? Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Gastroparesis

Type 2 Diabetes And Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis, also called delayed gastric emptying, is a disorder of the digestive tract that causes food to remain in the stomach for a period of time that is longer than average. This occurs because the nerves that move food through the digestive tract are damaged, so muscles don’t work properly. As a result, food sits in the stomach undigested. The most common cause of gastroparesis is diabetes. It can develop and progress over time, especially in those with uncontrolled blood sugar levels. The following are symptoms of gastroparesis: heartburn nausea vomiting of undigested food early fullness after a small meal weight loss bloating loss of appetite blood glucose levels that are hard to stabilize stomach spasms acid reflux Gastroparesis symptoms may be minor or severe, depending on the damage to the vagus nerve, a long cranial nerve that extends from the brain stem to the abdominal organs, including those of the digestive tract. Symptoms can flare up any time, but are more common after the consumption of high-fiber or high-fat foods, all of which are slow to digest. Women with diabetes have a high risk for developing gastroparesis. Other conditions can compound your risk of developing the disorder, including previous abdominal surgeries or a history of eating disorders. Diseases and conditions other than diabetes can cause gastroparesis, such as: viral infections acid reflux disease smooth muscle disorders Other illnesses can cause gastroparesis symptoms, including: Parkinson’s disease chronic pancreatitis cystic fibrosis kidney disease Turner’s syndrome Sometimes no known cause can be found, even after extensive testing. People who have gastroparesis have damage to their vagus nerve. This impairs nerve function and digestion because the impulses needed to chu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Horrible Stomach Aches? - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

Diabetes And Horrible Stomach Aches? - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

Dieting with Obstacles Those with special health concerns such as diabetes, fibromyalgia, pregnancy, etc can post here for extra support and help. I have type 2 diabetes and when I was my highest weight when I first learned I had diabetes, I could only tell something was wrong because my stomach hurt frightfully bad, to the point I was sweating and doubled over. It would only be in the morning time, and it would be cause I didn't eat soon enough. It happened when I was losing weight too, but not as much. One time when I ate many mints that had fake sugars in it my stomach hurt terribly bad. Now a days, I'm back to losing weight, and I'm not overeating. However, sometimes in the morning I wake up with a terrible stomach ache... and it won't feel okay until I eat something (even a cracker would do it). It only happens in the morning...it hurts A LOT, and it occurs from not eating OR from something to do with my bloodsugar. Haven't ever checked my bloodsugar when it happens. It doesn't prevent me from weight loss or anything... but I wonder, IS it diabetes related, or do I have another issue? Do other diabetics have this? I have type 2 diabetes and when I was my highest weight when I first learned I had diabetes, I could only tell something was wrong because my stomach hurt frightfully bad, to the point I was sweating and doubled over. It would only be in the morning time, and it would be cause I didn't eat soon enough. It happened when I was losing weight too, but not as much. One time when I ate many mints that had fake sugars in it my stomach hurt terribly bad. Now a days, I'm back to losing weight, and I'm not overeating. However, sometimes in the morning I wake up with a terrible stomach ache... and it won't feel okay until I eat something (even a cracker would do it Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gastrointestinal Issues

Diabetes And Gastrointestinal Issues

Gastrointestinal disorders occur more often in those with diabetes. In fact, at some point in their life, those with diabetes will develop a GI problem such as ulcers, gallstones, IBS or another GI disorder. Upwards of 75% of diabetes patients report to their doctors experiencing GI symptoms. Overlooked or Misdiagnosed While many experience these symptoms the diagnosis is not always the same and oftentimes is misdiagnosed initially. The entire gastrointestinal tract can be damaged and affected by diabetes starting at the mouth to the esophagus all the way through to the anorectal area. Because of the complex nature of GI symptoms and the area of the gastrointestinal tract that they cover, this leads to issues in diagnosing and treating GI conditions in diabetes patients. I advise reading the following articles: Previously GI conditions were not associated with diabetes. This also lead to misdiagnosis, overlooked conditions or even improper treatments. New research has begun to suggest otherwise, which is leading to an increase in GI issues and conditions in diabetes patients. Blood Sugar Control and its Correlation to Gastrointestinal Conditions Acute and chronic periods of high blood sugar can lead to GI complications. And as with other diabetes complications, poor blood sugar control is usually associated with more severe GI issues. Those with retinopathy and neuropathy should be tested to check for GI conditions. Dysfunction in how the neurons supply the enteric nervous system in the body can lead to GI complications. Similar to how nerves in the feet lead to neuropathy, the body’s intestinal nerves can also lead to enteric neuropathy. This type of neuropathy is known as autonomic neuropathy which can lead to an abnormality in how the body secretes and absorbs nutr Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis doesn’t sound good, and it isn’t. Literally “stomach paralysis,” it is a form of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, that is a common complication of diabetes. The damaged nerve in question is the vagus nerve, named for its vagabond-like wandering nature. The vagus nerve meanders all the way from the brainstem to the colon, controlling heart rate, sweating, gastrointestinal contractions, and various other involuntary, automatic functions on its way. In the case of gastroparesis, it’s the vagus nerve’s control of stomach contractions that’s damaged. The stomach is basically a hollow ball made of muscle that serves as a storage container and mixing bowl for food. It’s about the size of a small melon, but it can stretch to hold nearly a gallon if you really press the issue. In healthy people, wave-like contractions of the stomach, prompted by the vagus nerve, crush and churn your food into small particles and mix it up with enzymes and acids produced by the stomach’s inner lining. Then the stomach contractions, coming along in waves at about three per minute, slowly and evenly propel the pulverized food out through the pyloric valve, which opens just enough to release an eighth of an ounce of food at a time. From there it’s down the small intestine, where the real nutrient absorption occurs. It can take four hours to empty your stomach into your small intestine, especially if you’ve eaten fat, which slows the process down. If the vagus nerve has been damaged by years of high blood sugars, the process hits a snag. The walls of the stomach, paralyzed by the lack of vagus nerve stimulation, don’t make their muscular wave-like contractions. As a result, food just sticks around in the stomach, unpulverized and going nowhere. It may sit an Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Over time, diabetes can affect many parts of your body. One of those is the vagus nerve, which controls how quickly your stomach empties. When it's damaged, your digestion slows down and food stays in your body longer than it should. This is a condition called gastroparesis. It can make you feel queasy and vomit. It's also bad for your blood sugar levels. Although it's more common in people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 can also get it. Most people with gastroparesis have had diabetes for at least 10 years and also have other complications related to the disease. You may have: Heartburn or reflux (backup of stomach contents into the esophagus) Vomiting (in severe cases, this may happen daily) Feeling full quickly when eating Food that stays in your stomach too long can spoil and lead to the growth of bacteria. Undigested food can harden and form a lump called a bezoar. It can block your stomach and keep what you eat from moving into the small intestine. Gastroparesis can make it hard to control diabetes. When food finally does leave your stomach and enters the small intestine, your blood sugar goes up, too. Throwing up can also leave you dehydrated. Your doctor will ask about your symptoms. He’ll also do a physical exam, and he may check your blood sugar. He might also suggest other tests. Barium X-ray: You drink a liquid (barium), which coats your esophagus, stomach, and small intestine and shows up on X-rays. This test is also known as an upper GI (gastrointestinal) series or a barium swallow. Barium beefsteak meal: You eat a meal with barium in it, and the doctor uses an X-ray to watch how long it takes you to digest the food. That tells your doctor how quickly your stomach empties. Radioisotope gastric-emptying scan: You eat food that has a radioactive Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to make insulin because the body's  immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. No one knows exactly why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. A person probably would then have to be exposed to something else — like a virus — to get type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough ins Continue reading >>

Stomach Aches...would They Happen Because Of Too Much Sugar Ingested?

Stomach Aches...would They Happen Because Of Too Much Sugar Ingested?

stomach aches...would they happen because of too much sugar ingested? Friend Diagnosed with type two on July 5th, 2006 stomach aches...would they happen because of too much sugar ingested? I have to admit, that while I do eat foods, I also ingest junk foods, such as cookies, and m&m's and so forth...I have been "bad' lately...off and on, but, I am wondering if eating these sugars can cause a queasiness in the stomach area? Is it that my body isn't making enough insulin? or what is happening here? also, long term effects , since I still love the junk food(but, I DO eat regular foods, as well, what are we talking about here..could I be in serious trouble here?) Friend Diabetes suks - 2 kids with type 1 - I have type 2 If you are taking metformin, it can certainly cause yo stomach trouble as a side effect - cramps, nausea and diarhea. I used to love the junk food, and eating it will increase your cravings for it. It is called junk food for a reason, perhaps a better name would be killer food. Junk food by itself won't cause you to feel queasy. Regardless of how unhealthy it may be for you, it is still food and if you're body couldn't handle food we'd all be dead a long time ago. What can make you feel bad is having too much junk food, or regular food for that matter. Your body can only handle so much any anything, good or bad, and if you're eating a lot you won't feel well. It turns out you have to eat a lot less junk food than regular food to feel bad because junk food is often jam packed with calories whereas regular foods not so much. So, it may sound like redundant, but watch how much you're eating of any kind of food. Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 Friend Di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are common among all people, including those affected by diabetes. At some point in any patient's life, the chances that he or she will develop a GI tract problem, be it peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, irritable bowel syndrome, food poisoning, or some other malady, are extremely high. As many as 75% of patients visiting diabetes clinics will report significant GI symptoms. The entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from the oral cavity and esophagus to the large bowel and anorectal region. Thus, the symptom complex that may be experienced can vary widely. Common complaints may include dysphagia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many patients go undiagnosed and under-treated because the GI tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications. Both acute and chronic hyperglycemia can lead to specific GI complications. Diabetes is a systemic disease that may affect many organ systems, and the GI tract is no exception. As with other complications of diabetes, the duration of the disorder and poor glycemic control seem to be associated with more severe GI problems. Patients with a history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy should be presumed to have GI abnormalities until proven otherwise, and this is best determined by asking a few simple questions. (See "Patient Information".) Many GI complications of diabetes seem to be related to dysfunction of the neurons supplying the enteric nervous system. Just as the nerves in the feet may be affected in peripheral neuropathy, involvement of the intestinal nerves may lead to enteric neuropathy. This is a type of autonomic or "involuntary" neuropathy and may lead to abnormalities in intestinal motility, sensat Continue reading >>

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