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Diabetes Steam Room

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat Some of us might be thrilled if we could manage our blood sugar by sitting in a hot tub or sauna, instead of working up a sweat biking, or using an elliptical. Unfortunately, passively raising our body temperature will never provide the same variety of benefits as aerobic exercise. Yet, research suggests hot baths and saunas may benefit people struggling with insulin resistance or glucose control, and those unable to exercise. The glucose lowering benefit of heat was revealed when some non-diabetic research volunteers, whose blood sugar and core temperatures were monitored, ate similar meals after sitting in a hot bath (104 degrees F) for 60 minutes, and after an hour long bike ride. Researchers were surprised to discover that the participants after-meal glucose readings were 10 percent lower following the steamy bath than after biking. Raising our core temperature may lower post-meal glucose because of HSPs, or heat shock proteins. These proteins are part of the immune system, released as our body temperature rises. HSPs are believed to reduce blood sugar levels by transporting glucose from the blood to our skeletal muscles. While enjoying a 60 minute hot soak before dinner is not a daily option for most of us, incorporating heat therapy into our weekly routine is something to consider since - besides improving insulin sensitivity - hot baths and saunas offer other diabetes-related perks: The researchers found an hour long hot bath increases the bodys energy expenditure by 80 percent. Thats significant, though its far less than the energy spent on a 60 minute bike ride. An hour of pedaling burns about 630 calories, whereas 60 minutes in hot water uses 140 calories. Saunas are more efficient calorie burners than hot bath Continue reading >>

Using Steam Rooms And Saunas

Using Steam Rooms And Saunas

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've seen some messages about using steam rooms and saunas for those of us who are T2 but never seen an answer as to the pros and cons. Any help please?? I can't see a problem either way, my opinion would be it's too hot and I would melt! I remember being warned about saunas when I was on insulin, if my memory is correct I believe it had something to do with the heat constricts the blood vessels in the body which in turn can cause bg levels to plummet so the risk of hypos is great. A similar effect as a very hot bath will have too. If I am wrong (quite possibly) then Im sure someone will correct me, it has been nearly 3 years since I came off insulin so I am a bit rusty with the dos and donts. So can be dangerous for T1's and T2's on insulin and or bg reducing meds like Glic etc. As for a T2 on diet or diet and metformin, well if they say it can be dangerous I would tend to believe them, but maybe they are just covering their backsides but then why take the risk for the sake of a steam room or sauna, of course the choice is yours. I use saunas regularly after workouts. Before I got well managed I could observe slightly spikes in my BG immediately after sauna session, which followed a natural drop after the workout. So I'm among those who tend to rise after sauna, but my personal suspicion is that I do it too heavily which causes my body temperature to rise, similar to a fever which also makes me go higher. I have also read about people whose BG drops after sauna sessions, Continue reading >>

Spa, Sauna And Massage Therapy Return

Spa, Sauna And Massage Therapy Return

To enjoy the benefits of a spa or sauna, your diabetes must be well controlled. Stay well-hydrated, check your blood-glucose (sugar) levels more often than usual, and keep some quickly absorbed carbohydrates with you to treat hypoglycemia, if necessary. Wear flip-flops or sandals at all times to prevent injuries and infections. For several reasons, saunas and Finnish-style spas (alternating hot and cold) are often contra-indicated for people with diabetes, especially those being treated with insulin . Cause excessive sweating, which can lead to dehydration, producing a decrease in blood volume and, consequently, higher blood glucose (sugar) levels. Increase certain hormones that oppose the action of insulin, such as growth hormone and glucagon , which have a hyperglycemic effect (raising blood sugar). Dilate the blood vessels, increase the speed of insulin absorption and cause unusual variations in blood glucose levels. Dry out the skin and cause skin conditions or wounds. In addition, diabetes predisposes sufferers to cardiac complications, a contra-indication of sauna use. Also, public spaces like swimming pools, showers and saunas increase the risk of contamination by fungal or other types of infections that can aggravate conditions like neuropathy (a complication of diabetes that affects the nerves). A person with diabetes can have a massage from time to time. The latest data indicate that massage can help relieve the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy and normalize blood glucose (sugar) levels by increasing insulin sensitivity. It is important to inform the massage therapist about your diabetes and other health problems or skin conditions. If you have any circulatory problems, vascular disorders or uncontrolled blood sugar, massage may not be recommended. It is impor Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Steam Therapy

Everything You Need To Know About Steam Therapy

Everything You Need to Know About Steam Therapy Steam rooms have been used for centuries for numerous medicinal and beauty purposes. First made popular by ancient Greeks and Romans, they are still used today as alternative therapies to promote healing and improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Similar to saunas, steam rooms are meant to induce sweating, which provides numerous health benefits including body detoxification, pain relief, better blood circulation, etc. Some people use steam rooms to cure different ailments, while some others use them just to relax their body and mind. Ever Wondered What the Difference is Between a Sauna and a Steam Room? The greatest difference between the sauna and the steam room is the humidity of the air. Steam rooms use moist heat, while saunas provide dry heat. The humidity in the sauna ranges from 5 to 30 percent, while steam rooms generally rely on 100 percent humidity. The sauna room is usually heated with a wood stove or an electric heater, which warms up the stones that consequently irradiate dry heat throughout the room. Water can sometimes be poured over hot stones to create steam and temporarily increase humidity. Sauna walls and benches are made of wood, which allows people to sit on them and touch them, as they do not heat up like rocks. Steam rooms, by contrast, do not use a heater. The temperature and the humidity of the air are achieved by pumping steam into the room, which comes from a large water-filled generator that produces water vapor at high levels of humidity. The steam room is usually lined in ceramic tile, which has the ability to contain moisture, and it has a sloping ceiling to prevent condensed steam from dripping onto the occupants. The other great difference between the sauna and the steam room Continue reading >>

Top 10 Health Benefits Of Steam Rooms And Saunas

Top 10 Health Benefits Of Steam Rooms And Saunas

Top 10 Health Benefits of Steam Rooms and Saunas by Dr. Edison de Mello | Feb 17, 2017 | Health Tips | 0 comments A relaxing massage at the spa or a workout often comes hand in hand with a sweat session inside a steam room or sauna, warming you up and loosening your muscles. But did you know these heated spaces offer a surprising number of health benefits? But First: Sauna or Steam Room Whats the Difference? Saunas have been used in Finland for more than 200 years. Traditionally, these rooms are heated using a stove with rocks over it. 1 Often, water is ladled onto the rocks. The temperature in saunas can get between 160 and 200F and its a dry heat. Humidity levels in saunas typically range between five to 30 percent. A new type of sauna called an infrared sauna uses light to warm only your body, instead of the air around it. 2 Conversely, steam rooms usually deliver 100 percent humidity, with temperatures ranging from 110 to 114F. These types of sweat baths come from the Roman, Turkish, and Russian traditions of steam bathing. The benefits of bathing in heat are shared between steam rooms and both traditional and infrared saunas. Here are some ways these heated rooms can boost your health. According to the World Health Organization, 47.5 million people in the world have dementia, including Alzheimers disease. 3 This deterioration in cognitive functioning is a major problem for aging populations. A recent study conducted on 2,000 Finnish men found that using a sauna 4-7 times per week may reduce the risk of dementia.4 Subjects who used a sauna frequently were 66 percent less likely to have dementia as they aged. Heated rooms can also be good for heart health. A 2015 study, also performed in Finland, found that participants who regularly visited a sauna had a lower chan Continue reading >>

Steam Room And Diabetes ?

Steam Room And Diabetes ?

I suffer from type 2 diabetes controlled by metformin tablets. I used the steam room at the gym and felt fantastic and very relaxed --- once home i had many friends and websites saying that it wasnt recommended for people with diabetes - but no real explanation why.Does anyone know why this is, or currently use... show more I suffer from type 2 diabetes controlled by metformin tablets. I used the steam room at the gym and felt fantastic and very relaxed --- once home i had many friends and websites saying that it wasnt recommended for people with diabetes - but no real explanation why. Does anyone know why this is, or currently use a steam room with diabetes? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Steam rooms, hot tubs, whirlpools, foot baths, waxing, sugaring, everything has a warning on it from past ages when glucose was not controled at all, ever. So now we have to live with the legacy of this. Even hair cuts, barber shaves, facials, etc are not approved of for diabetics!! If a person does NOT have periferal nerve disease, loss of feeling in feet fingers, etc, and does not have open sore of any kind, there is absolutely no reason why they cannot partake and enjoy the finer things in life. loss of feeling a person could conceivably get burned, Oh, I forgot about the electric blankets, hair dryers, blow dryers, electric curling irons, electric shavers, gettin tatts, gettin piercings, getting perms or hair colorings, none of these should be used or done if one is a diabetic either. Takes all the fun and comfort out of life to make those kinds of rules. They are "cover their a**" rulings so if a diabetic gets hurt or damaged in any way, the Y, gym, parlor, etc are not responsible. Do not worry about any of these things unless you have the first mentio Continue reading >>

Steam Room: Benefits, Risks, And Differences To Sauna

Steam Room: Benefits, Risks, And Differences To Sauna

A steam room is a heated room that people use for relaxation and to relieve some medical conditions. They are often found in gyms or spas. A steam room is created when a water-filled generator pumps steam into an enclosed space so there is moisture in the air when people are sitting in it. The temperature inside a steam room is generally between 110F and 114F with a humidity level of 100 percent . There are several health benefits associated with a steam room, each of which is described here. Sitting in a steam room has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system, particularly in older people. A 2012 study found that moist heat, such as that provided by a steam room, can improve circulation by dilating the small blood vessels or capillaries. Blood can then flow more easily and transport oxygen around the body. Steam room therapy has also been shown to reduce blood pressure and keep the heart healthier, as well as help to repair broken skin tissue caused by wounds, such as ulcers. Steam rooms may help to remove toxins from the skin, and are popular for improving skin health. Both steam rooms and saunas will make a person sweat due to the heat The sweating opens up the pores and helps cleanse the outer skin. Warm condensation will help rinse away dirt and dead skin and has been used in the treatment of acne . However, what a steam room also does that a sauna does not is help remove the toxins trapped below the skin. Often, after a workout, a person's muscles will feel sore. This pain is known as delayed onset muscle soreness, and it is important to relax the muscles to promote a quick and healthy recovery. A 2013 study showed that the immediate application of moist heat after a workout helped reduce pain and preserve muscle strength. The heat sooth Continue reading >>

Hot Tub Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Blood Sugar Levels & Improves Sleep

Hot Tub Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Blood Sugar Levels & Improves Sleep

Hot Tub Therapy has found to be useful in controlling Type 2 diabetes. Yes, you read that correctly. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 15.7 million Americans are diabetic. More people are being diagnosed as diabetic every day! Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90% of cases. It is a disorder in which the body is not able to make enough insulin or to properly use insulin to turn the glucose in food into energy. Having Type 2 Diabetes does not mean that it’s the end of the world. With a simple guide to managing Type 2 Diabetes, you can still live a healthy and happy life. Since November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, I thought it would be a good time to shine a spotlight on a serious disease that leads to potentially life-threatening complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and possible amputation. Studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine have given new hope to the millions who suffer from diabetes. “Hot tub therapy” helped a group of Type 2 diabetics reduce their blood sugar levels and improve sleep patterns. (If I had Type 2 diabetes, I”d take those improvements for starters, wouldn’t you?) Hot tubbing was judged beneficial because the effects of partial immersion in a hot tub simulate the beneficial effects of exercise. Physical exercise is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Soaking in a hot tub was found to be beneficial for Type 2 diabetes according to an independent study done by Dr. Philip L. Hooper at the McKee Medical Center in Loveland, Colorado. He studied a group of Type 2 diabetes patients for three weeks. The patients were required to soak in a hot tub for thirty minutes a day, six days a week, for the duration of the study Continue reading >>

Negative Effects Of Steam Rooms

Negative Effects Of Steam Rooms

Myrna St. Romain has been a writer for more than three years, contributing to such sites as ataglance.com and leisurepro.com. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition from University of Nebraska in 2004 as well as personal training certifications through ACE and NASM. Steam rooms have been used for hundreds of years to improve blood circulation, drain sinuses, rejuvenate skin, and relieve joint and muscle tension. These are definite benefits, but steam rooms also have their drawbacks. A little caution and forward thinking can help you avoid the negative effects of steam rooms. Bacteria and fungi prefer damp, warm environments with little light. This makes steam rooms perfect breeding grounds for infections to spread. One of the most common is athlete's foot, or tinea pedis, which can occur when your bare feet are exposed the floor of a steam room. Athlete's foot causes stinging, itching, and burning between toes and other areas on your foot. Another common fungal infection is jock itch, or tinea cruris, that affects the upper thigh, genital and buttocks. If someone who has jock itch was sitting on a bench in a steam room, it increases the likelihood the next person who sits there may become infected as well. Always wear shoes in a steam room, and if you sit on a bench, place a clean towel beneath you. Steam room temperatures range from 110 to 116 degrees F, with 100 percent humidity. A great deal of perspiration ensues, and dehydration can result if you are not careful. The best way to avoid this is to drink plenty of water before and after the steam room, and not to stay in the steam room for more than 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Those with respiratory disease, heart palpitations, high or low blood pressure, diabetes and the elderly should consult a phys Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Drops After Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes

Blood Glucose Drops After Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes

Try not to exercise at the peak of your insulin action. Exercising when your insulin peaks will increase your risk of a rapid drop in your blood sugar. Try to anticipate when you will exercise and plan it around the peak action points. Avoid late evening exercise. You should attempt to stop your exercise at least two hours before you intend to sleep at night so that you can assess how your exercise is affecting your blood sugar. If you exercise right before bedtime you increase the risk of a nighttime hypoglycemic reaction that could be serious. If your blood sugar is less than 100 mg/dL before bed, you might consider doubling your snack or, if possible, reducing your insulin dosage to lessen the risk of a low blood sugar reaction while you sleep. Take a pass on a post-workout sauna, steam room, or hot-tub session. Each of these is relaxing, but they all continue to keep your heart rate up and may contribute to lower your blood glucose as a result. Check your blood glucose immediately after you exercise and for several hours afterward. It makes sense to most people with type 1 diabetes that they should check their blood sugar shortly after exercise to ensure that it is at a safe level. But far fewer would think to check their blood sugar again two to four hours after exercise to check for a delayed drop of their blood sugar. If you notice that your blood sugar is lower at this two- to four-hour post-exercise check, you should check it again in another two to four hours or until you are certain your glycogen from exercise has been replaced and you no longer see a lowering of your glucose. For longer workouts, eat an extra snack before you exercise. If you anticipate an exercise session of more than 30 minutes, you might consider taking an extra 15 carbohydrates to help Continue reading >>

Sauna Vs Steam Room Benefits And Negative Effects

Sauna Vs Steam Room Benefits And Negative Effects

Home Featured Sauna vs Steam Room Benefits and Negative Effects Sauna vs Steam Room Benefits and Negative Effects A Finnish word Sauna means bathhouse. A 2000-year-old sauna bathing traditions are mostly credited with unique Finnish culture.People in other parts of the world practiced steam bathing with historical evidence having been found in Egypt, India, Greece, Rome, China, Japan, and Russia. Throughout history, sauna and steam bathing were not only a form of relaxation but also a way to heal diseases, cleanse the body and even purify the soul.In between sweat cycles, the Finns would immerse themselves in cold water while Native Americans built sweat lodges with carefully selected stones which were heated and then gathered in a hollow for purposes of a purification ritual or a sweat ceremony. There are a lot of types of saunas - traditional, smoke, and infrared but generally, offering dry heat, saunas revolved around hot stones.Some steam may be created in a traditional sauna by pouring water on a stove or hot stones. The wet heat created for a steam bath is producedby boiling water that requires a powerful steam generator. Turkish Bath (Hammam), Aroma room, Japanese Salt-Steam Bath, Native American Sweat Lodge, RussianBanya, a steam room, and steam showers are types of steam baths. Both offer stress relief by offering a private, quiet and warm space away from the rest of the world. The heat will relax your muscles, improve circulation, boost the immune system, and gradually increase endorphins releasing to make you feel good.Heat causes you to sweat profusely in order to cleanse the body impurities. Doctors agree to this purpose of saunas as it is important to detoxify regularly. An occasional sweat in the sauna or steam room is absolutely good for the skin as it Continue reading >>

Sauna Vs. Steam Room: Which Is Better?

Sauna Vs. Steam Room: Which Is Better?

Have you ever wondered about the health benefits of using a sauna or steam room? Many of us enjoy these treatments at our local health club or spa because they feel good after a tough workout or a long day at the office. But it turns out that using these heated rooms can provide certain health and medical advantages, as well. But in the sauna vs. steam room debatewhich treatment wins? Asteam roomsometimes called a Turkish-style bathprovides moist heat. These rooms are usually made from tile (or sometimes another non-porous material like glass or plastic) and are airtight to trap all of the moisturethat is created by a steam generator. When you enter a steam room, you'll immediately notice the presence of steam both on your skin (it will feel damp) and in the air, which often feels thick. Steam rooms are designed to accommodate 95 to 100 percent humidity. The temperature in a steam room may range from 100 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit, but it may feel warmer because of the high humidity. In some steam rooms, you'll find a spray bottle of eucalyptus oil or another scent to enhance your steam experience. Because steam rises, you'll find that sitting higher in a steam room provides more intense heat and steam. Sitting lower in a steam room offers less steam and heat. Anyone who has spent time in a steam room will immediately see benefits to the skin. Moisture helps skin to look refreshed and dewy in the short term. But the benefits don't end there. Moist heat may help relieve symptoms of colds and congestion (especially when combined with eucalyptus oil) and people with sore muscles often feel relief after sitting for a few minutes in a steam room. Studies have shown that moist heat is more effective than dry heat for relieving delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), the muscle Continue reading >>

Bath And Sauna In Diabetes Mellitus

Bath And Sauna In Diabetes Mellitus

Some researches show the usefulness of steam bath in case of diabetes mellitus, but in some cases steaming is prohibited for patients that suffer from this disease. Under the influence of the steam, some substances, binding insulin, are washed away, while the excessive amount of it may lead to hypoglycemic coma. Upon the first signs of coma patient has to drink hot sweet tea, but in very hard cases there is a need of direct glucose injection in patients organism via intravenous route. Most of patients agree that bathing has positive effect both in Russian and Turkish baths. Apart from overall improving effect, bathing helps to decrease blood sugar level, moreover, effect from this procedure works for 5-6 hours. However, if a patient has visited the steam bath, it is necessary to have another examination to detect possible counter-indications. In this case doctor may define an optimal temperature range, duration of staying in the bath as well as the rest, including or excluding, presumably, some other procedures. Counter-indications to bath in case of diabetes mellitus The acetone odor is a sign prohibiting to visit any bath, especially, when there are chronic diseases of kidneys and acute liver diseases as well as if there are some cardio-vascular diseases. Patient has to monitor his or her condition in bath and should avoid quick temperature changes. Patient also should not dip his or her body into cold water right after leaving the steam room because it may lead to vessel spasms. Besides, there is a high probability of fungus infections; that is why patient should take care of his feet and soils. This person must have personal slippers and look over soils after the bath. Visiting sauna in case of diabetes mellitus Sauna in case of diabetes mellitus and in general is Continue reading >>

Steam Room: Benefits, Risks, And How It Compares To A Sauna

Steam Room: Benefits, Risks, And How It Compares To A Sauna

Steam rooms are similar to saunas. Both encourage you to sit in a small, heated room, and both claim your health will benefit. The big difference is in the type of heat that they provide. A sauna uses dry heat, usually from hot rocks or a closed stove. Steam rooms are heated by a generator filled with boiling water. While a sauna may help relax and loosen your muscles, it wont have the same health benefits of a steam room. The key to the steam rooms unique health benefits is the humidity. A steam room can improve your health in several ways. Sitting in a steam room might significantly improve your cardiovascular health. A study of older individuals showed that moist heat improved circulation, especially in extremities. Improved circulation can lead to lowered blood pressure and a healthier heart. It can also promote healing of broken skin tissue. Research shows that in a steam room, some peoples bodies release hormones that change their heart rate. One of these hormones, called aldosterone, regulates your blood pressure. When aldosterone is released from sitting in the steam room, it can help lower high blood pressure. This is part of the reason that the steam room makes you feel relaxed. Being in the steam room can also decrease your bodys production of cortisol. Cortisol is the hormone that regulates the level of stress that you feel. When your cortisol levels drop, you feel more in control and relaxed. Spending a few minutes in a relaxed state not only improves your health, but also helps heal your mind and improve your focus. Steam rooms create an environment that warms the mucous membrane and encourages deep breathing. As a result, using one can help break up congestion inside your sinuses and lungs. Steam therapy used for treating colds and sinus infections at ho Continue reading >>

Steam Room Vs Diabetes

Steam Room Vs Diabetes

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Well I've been in a gym for a long time now but I didn't really use the steam room since I got diagnosed with diabetes. Now that I stabilized my bg with my insulin pump, I started going to gym again and I realized that the steam room can really relax my body and even decrease my bg. But let's get to the main point. I realized that my feet burns a lot when I get in the steam room and I can't wear my slippers cos they might melt. I've been told not to use too hot water in bathroom incase it might hurt my feet, so does this apply in steam room too? It burns pretty much and I was wondering if it damages anything on my feet. I wouldn't want any neruopathy to happen out of nowhere. I like to get in the steam room after a long hour of gym. Also a little tiny question here; how many grams of carbs = 1 grams of sugar? ) Since you were only diagnosed last year, you are unlikely to have neuropathy, so you should be able to tell if your feet are burning. Hopefully, with your new pump, your long term control should be good enough so you won't have to worry about it in the future. My experience (of nearly 33 years) is that diabetes clinics are OBSESSED with foot problems. I suspect that they have to deal with a lot of poorly controlled people, many of them T2's who have been unaware of years of high BG's and now have problems. I use the Sauna and Jacuzzi at the gym without problems. The only thing to consider is what to do with your pump. I would be inclined to take it off as I cannot imagine the hot steamy atmosphere would be good for it. If you are going to leave it off for an hour or so, you might need Continue reading >>

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