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Diabetes Statistics South Africa 2017

Distribution, Incidence, Prevalence And Default Of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Accessing Public Healthcare In The 11 Districts Of Kwazulu-natal, South Africa

Distribution, Incidence, Prevalence And Default Of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Accessing Public Healthcare In The 11 Districts Of Kwazulu-natal, South Africa

BACKGROUND: The global increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is most marked in African countries. The District Health Information System (DHIS) is the primary data collection system of the Department of Health in KwaZulu-Natal Province (KZN), South Africa. Data are routinely collected at all public healthcare facilities in the province and are aggregated per facility OBJECTIVE: To investigate the distribution, incidence and prevalence of diabetes in the public healthcare sector of KZN METHODS: Data collected by the DHIS for all patients with diabetes in KZN from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014 inclusive were analysed. Additional open-source databases were accessed to enable further exploration of the data collected RESULTS: The study showed that the majority (38.7%) of patients with diabetes on the public sector register were from the district of eThekwini. Positive correlations were found between the prevalence of diabetes, the mortality rate and the number of defaulters (patients with diabetes who did not return for regular treatment CONCLUSIONS: Provincial estimates of the prevalence of diabetes in this study were higher than the known national prevalence. This may be due to the large proportion of Indians in KZN, who have a genetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus. However, allowance must be made for possible inaccurate data collection at source with miscounting of individuals. This study supports the global trend of an association between diabetes and urbanisation and highlights the need for regular diabetes screening and education, particularly in the public healthcare domain Developing, low-income countries not only confront the challenge of resource constraints, an ageing population and urbanisation, but also face the double burden of communicab Continue reading >>

Stats Sa: Tb, Diabetes Top 2 Killers In Sa

Stats Sa: Tb, Diabetes Top 2 Killers In Sa

Stats SA: TB, diabetes top 2 killers in SA HIV came in as the fifth leading cause of natural deaths at 4.8%. JOHANNESBURG - Stats SAs 2016 mortality report has found that tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes remain the top two killers among South Africas population. The report - which looks at the causes of death - was released on Tuesday. Stats SAs latest mortality report found that since 2007, there has been a gradual decline in the number of deaths per year from 606,000 in 2015 to 456,000 in 2016. There was a decline of 3% in the number of deaths recorded between 2015 and 2017, however, this might change with the late registration of deaths. The two main natural causes of death are TB and diabetes, making up 6.5% and 5.5% of natural deaths respectively. HIV came in as the fifth leading cause of natural deaths at 4.8%. The accidental injury made up two-thirds of the non-natural deaths, with assault coming in at second with 14% while traffic accidents killed about one in 10 people. Tuberculosis remains the leading underlying cause of #death in South Africa followed by Diabetes mellitus #StatsSA pic.twitter.com/ZDYypIuwFm Continue reading >>

High Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Syndrome In A South African Coloured Population: Baseline Data Of A Study In Bellville, Cape Town

High Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Syndrome In A South African Coloured Population: Baseline Data Of A Study In Bellville, Cape Town

National Collaborative Research Programme for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town Andre P Kengne, MD, PhD Corresponding author: T Matsha ([email protected]) Objective. The coloured population has the second-highest prevalence of diabetes in South Africa. However, the data were based on a study conducted almost 20 years ago in a peri-urban coloured population of the Western Cape. We aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in an urban coloured population in South Africa. Design. In a cross-sectional survey, 642 participants aged 31 years were drawn from an urban community of Bellville South, Cape Town, from mid-January 2008 to March 2009. Type 2 diabetes was assessed according to the WHO criteria, and metabolic syndrome was based on the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), ATP III and 2009 Joint Interim Statement (JIS) definition. Results. The crude prevalence of 28.2% (age-adjusted 26.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 22.0 - 30.3) for type 2 diabetes was: 4.4% (age-adjusted 3.2%, 95% CI 1.6 - 4.9) for impaired fasting glycaemia, and 15.3% (age-adjusted 15.0%, 95% CI 11.4 - 18.6) for impaired glucose tolerance. Undiagnosed type 2 diabetes was present in 18.1% (age-adjusted 16.8%, 95% CI 13.3 - 20.4). The crude prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher with the JIS definition (62.0%) than the IDF (60.6%), and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) ATP III (55.4%). There was good overall agreement between the MetS criteria, k=0.89 (95% CI 0.85 - 0.92). Conclusion. The prevalence of diabetes has increased hugely in the coloured community, and the high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes portends that cardiovascular diseases might grow to epidemic proportions in the nea Continue reading >>

Sa's Diabetes Epidemic Is Growing At An Alarming Rate

Sa's Diabetes Epidemic Is Growing At An Alarming Rate

SA's diabetes epidemic is growing at an alarming rate 22 November 2017 - 12:03 By Claire Keeton It's estimated that 2.3 million South African adults have diabetes. The weight of the increasing diabetes and obesity epidemic in South Africa threatens to crush the countrys overloaded health system experts warn. South Africa and Egypt are driving the rapidly growing diabetes epidemic on the continent according to the first major study in Africa on diabetes and obesity. Lead author Professor Andre Kengne director of the Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit based at Tygerberg Hospital said their analysis found diabetes and weight gain had risen between 1980 and 2014. He said: Africa is the region in the world where diabetes is growing fastest. It is growing faster than our coping capacity. We want to find a way to get it under control and that is why we are piloting the SA diabetes prevention project. Nicholas van Rooy 47 is among more than 400 people from seven Cape Town townships who have joined the project. He is glad that he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2011 while on medical aid. Taking part in this research is like getting a second opinion to see if what Im doing is working. I have changed my eating habits and I do self-testing at home said the father of two. His sister-in-law and mother-in-law also have type 2 diabetes. [Type 2 diabetes]used to be an adult condition and now it is not uncommon to see it in 15-year-olds Unlike in previous decades type 2 diabetes is also occurring at a younger age. Kengne said: This used to be an adult condition and now it is not uncommon to see it in 15-year-olds. If we are only targeting adults we will miss it. Half the people in South Africa and most citizens of other African countries with this insidious disease are unawar Continue reading >>

Prevalence And Unmet Need For Diabetes Care Across The Care Continuum In A National Sample Of South African Adults: Evidence From The Sanhanes-1, 2011-2012

Prevalence And Unmet Need For Diabetes Care Across The Care Continuum In A National Sample Of South African Adults: Evidence From The Sanhanes-1, 2011-2012

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Prevalence and unmet need for diabetes care across the care continuum in a national sample of South African adults: Evidence from the SANHANES-1, 2011-2012 Affiliation Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United Stated of America Roles Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Visualization, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United Stated of America Roles Conceptualization, Methodology, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation, Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa Roles Conceptualization, Data curation, Methodology, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation, Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa Roles Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Supervision, Writing review & editing Affiliation Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation, Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa Roles Methodology, Writing review & editing Affiliation Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation, Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa Roles Methodology, Writing review & editing Affiliation Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation, Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa Roles Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology Affiliation Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation, Human Sciences Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa Continue reading >>

Members

Members

The IDF Africa Region currently represents 35 diabetes organisations in 32 countries. Click a country on the map to see information South Africais one of the 32 countries of the IDF African region. 425 million people have diabetes in the world and more than 16 million people in the AFR Region; by 2045 it will be around 41 million. There were 1,826.1 cases of diabetes in South Africa in 2017. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is an umbrella organization of over 230 national diabetes associations in 170 countries and territories. It represents the interests of the growing number of people with diabetes and those at risk. The Federation has been leading the global diabetes community since 1950. It is estimated that 93 million people worldwide have Diabetic Retinopathy (DR), and that 1 in 3 people with diabet The number of people living with #Diabetes is set to reach 629 million by 2045, an increase of 48%. Learn more abou Around the world, the full provision and availability of #diabetes supplies is even lower than it is for #insulin i Continue reading >>

How South Africa Can Beat Its Sugar-fuelled Diabetes Epidemic

How South Africa Can Beat Its Sugar-fuelled Diabetes Epidemic

Diabetes is now the biggest killer of women in South Africa How South Africa can beat its sugar-fuelled diabetes epidemic Four times as many people have Type II diabetes today as 36 years ago, according to the World Health Organisation. In 1980, 108 million people were diagnosed with diabetes worldwide. By 2014, the figure was 422 million writes Dr Sundeep Ruder. In South Africa, 7% of adults aged 21 to 79 3.85 million people have diabetes. A large proportion of these remain undiagnosed. The global prevalence of adult diabetes has nearly doubled and is rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Globally, about 1.5 million people died as a direct result of diabetes in 2012. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. Stringent glucose control has reduced some small-vessel complications such as blindness and kidney failure. The residual risk of large-vessel complications such as heart attacks and stroke remains high. Excessive calorie consumption and sedentary lifestyles are the main contributors to the development of diabetes. Some people with a genetic predisposition to the disease are considered high risk, but it is largely preventable. As South Africans become more urbanised, exposure to high-caloric, processed foods has increased, and rates of diabetes with it. Being able to buy processed food-like products is often seen as a mark of personal and material success. Little attention is paid to having a healthy diet. Intense advertising campaigns by the beverage and food product industries exacerbate the problem. Being able to buy processed food-like products is often seen as a mark of personal and material success. Little attention is paid to having a healthy diet. Intenseadvertisingcampaigns b Continue reading >>

Prevalence And Unmet Need For Diabetes Care Across The Care Continuum In A National Sample Of South African Adults: Evidence From The Sanhanes-1, 2011-2012

Prevalence And Unmet Need For Diabetes Care Across The Care Continuum In A National Sample Of South African Adults: Evidence From The Sanhanes-1, 2011-2012

Prevalence and unmet need for diabetes care across the care continuum in a national sample of South African adults: Evidence from the SANHANES-1, 2011-2012 Andrew Stokes , Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, Methodology, Supervision, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing,1,* Kaitlyn M. Berry , Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Visualization, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing,1 Zandile Mchiza , Conceptualization, Methodology, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing,2 Whadi-ah Parker , Conceptualization, Data curation, Methodology, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing,2 Demetre Labadarios , Conceptualization, Funding acquisition, Supervision, Writing review & editing,2 Lumbwe Chola , Methodology, Writing review & editing,2 Charles Hongoro , Methodology, Writing review & editing,2 Khangelani Zuma , Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology,2 Alana T. Brennan , Writing review & editing,1,3 Peter C. Rockers , Writing review & editing,1 and Sydney Rosen , Conceptualization, Methodology, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing1,3 1 Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United Stated of America Received 2016 Sep 28; Accepted 2017 Aug 21. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. South Africa faces an epidemic of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs), yet national surveillance is limited due to the lack of recent data. We used data from the first comprehensive natio Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Because Of Status

Diabetes Risk Because Of Status

Medical costs expected to skyrocket after South Africas credit rating downgrade to junk status.Sugar-coated sweets.PHOTO: William Hook Flickr Over 100,000 new diabetes cases are expected in South Africa in 2017 in the public sector alone, and costs of treating the disease are rising. The countrys recent downgrade to junk status has public health experts concerned about a spike in medical expenses. There are close to 10,000 new cases of diabetes in the South African public sector every month, and this is growing, according to Professor Karen Hofman from the University of the Witwatersrand. Clinics are already reporting being overwhelmed with the new diabetes cases, which are often not easy to manage by the time a person has been diagnosed usually in a fairly late stage of the disease. Furthermore, with the downgrade to junk status for SA, the cost of pharmaceuticals will skyrocket and will impact the cost of care of people with diabetes in both the public and private sector, Hofman said. Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot adequately control its blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes is not common and can be present in young people, but type 2 diabetes, which generally develops later in life, is responsible for more than 90% of all cases. All type 1 diabetics need the injectable medicine insulin while type 2 diabetics are treated with oral medicines but some might eventually need insulin too, says Andy Gray, a senior lecturer in pharmacology at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Gray said that if the junk status downgrade results in a marked slump in the value of the rand, then an impact on medicine prices is inevitable, as we are almost entirely dependent on imported active ingredients or finished products. In South Africa, type 2 diabetics are often diagnosed long Continue reading >>

How South Africa Can Beat Its Sugar-fuelled Diabetesepidemic

How South Africa Can Beat Its Sugar-fuelled Diabetesepidemic

How South Africa can beat its sugar-fuelled diabetesepidemic Clinical Endocrinologist & Associate Lecturer, University of the Witwatersrand Sundeep Ruder does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons license. Early detection and treatment of diabetes can be life-saving, but prevention by adopting healthier diets and lifestyle is even better. Mario Anzuoni/Reuters Four times as many people have Type II diabetes today as 36 years ago, according to the World Health Organisation . In 1980, 108 million people were diagnosed with diabetes worldwide. By 2014, the figure was 422 million. In South Africa, 7% of adults aged 21 to 79 3.85 million people have diabetes. A large proportion of these remain undiagnosed. The global prevalence of adult diabetes has nearly doubled and is rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Globally, about 1.5 million people died as a direct result of diabetes in 2012. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. Stringent glucose control has reduced some small-vessel complications such as blindness and kidney failure. The residual risk of large-vessel complications such as heart attacks and stroke remains high. Excessive calorie consumption and sedentary lifestyles are the main contributors to the development of diabetes. Some people with a genetic predisposition to the disease are considered high risk, but it is largely preventable. As South Africans become more urbanised, exposure to high-caloric, processed foods has increased, and rates Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes In South Africa

Prevalence Of Diabetes In South Africa

'The diabetes tsunami is here. And we in South Africa are in trouble.' This is the stark warning of an SA diabetes expert over the fast-growing diabetes numbers in South Africa. "The diabetes tsunami is here. And we in South Africa are in trouble." This is the stark warning of Dr Larry Distiller, founder and managing director of the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Johannesburg, over the ever-increasing diabetes numbers in South Africa. "Three-and-a-half million South Africans (about 6% of the population) suffer from diabetes and there are many more who are undiagnosed," he cautions. It is estimated that anotherfive million South Africans have pre-diabetes , a condition where insulin resistance causes blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be type 2 diabetes. The highest prevalence of diabetes is among the Indian population in South Africa (11-13%) as this group has a strong genetic predisposition for diabetes. This is followed by 8-10% in the coloured community, 5-8% among blacks and 4% among whites. There are three types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes (a condition where the body stops producing insulin, an essential hormone produced by the pancreas to convert glucose into energy); type 2 diabetes (a condition that develops over time where the body is unable to use insulin properly); and gestational diabetes (a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy due to hormonal changes, genetics and lifestyle factors). The majority of people in South Africa have type 2 diabetes, however many of these cases go undiagnosed as there are very few symptoms initially. Symptoms for diabetes include fatigue, excessive thirst and urination, slow wound healing and skin infections, blurred vision and regular bouts of thrush. As these symptoms c Continue reading >>

Health-e News: Diabetes Moves Up The Killer Charts

Health-e News: Diabetes Moves Up The Killer Charts

Women are the most vulnerable to diseases that thrive when a person is too fat. But “fat shaming” individuals won’t help when junk food is cheaper than healthy food and health education is virtually non-existent. HEALTH-E’s Kerry Cullinan reports. The new killer in town preys on older, overweight women from poor communities. It has been moving stealthily through the population, its influence under-estimated as our attention has been focused on HIV and tuberculosis. But suddenly diabetes has emerged as the biggest killer of South African women and the second biggest killer overall, according to 2015 death statistics released recently by Statistics South Africa. Seven years before this, diabetes was not even in the Top 10 killers. But now it is second only to TB. Clinics are being overwhelmed by cases of diabetes and hypertension, both linked to bad diet and being too fat. By late last year, public health facilities were seeing more than 15,000 new cases of diabetes and close to 25,000 new hypertension cases every month, according to the health department’s District Health Information System (DHIS). There are now over eight-million obese people in South Africa, far outnumbering the six-million South Africans living with HIV. Many people on antiretroviral (ARV) medicine are also on medication for diabetes and hypertension, yet not enough research has been done on how all the medication interacts. At one Cape Town clinic, three-quarters of the ARV patients were also on hypertension medicine, according to Professor Tolu Oni from the University of Cape Town. KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo have the highest diabetes burden, while “the most deprived districts tended to have higher incidence”, according to the 2016 District Health Barometer (DHB) released two weeks ago. Continue reading >>

Trends In Obesity And Diabetes Across Africa From 1980 To 2014: An Analysis Of Pooled Population-based Studies

Trends In Obesity And Diabetes Across Africa From 1980 To 2014: An Analysis Of Pooled Population-based Studies

Trends in obesity and diabetes across Africa from 1980 to 2014: an analysis of pooled population-based studies NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC) Africa Working Group Search for other works by this author on: International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 46, Issue 5, 1 October 2017, Pages 14211432, NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC) Africa Working Group; Trends in obesity and diabetes across Africa from 1980 to 2014: an analysis of pooled population-based studies, International Journal of Epidemiology, Volume 46, Issue 5, 1 October 2017, Pages 14211432, The 2016 Dar Es Salaam Call to Action on Diabetes and Other non-communicable diseases (NCDs) advocates national multi-sectoral NCD strategies and action plans based on available data and information from countries of sub-Saharan Africa and beyond. We estimated trends from 1980 to 2014 in age-standardized mean body mass index (BMI) and diabetes prevalence in these countries, in order to assess the co-progression and assist policy formulation. We pooled data from African and worldwide population-based studies which measured height, weight and biomarkers to assess diabetes status in adults aged 18 years. A Bayesian hierarchical model was used to estimate trends by sex for 200 countries and territories including 53 countries across five African regions (central, eastern, northern, southern and western), in mean BMI and diabetes prevalence (defined as either fasting plasma glucose of 7.0 mmol/l, history of diabetes diagnosis, or use of insulin or oral glucose control agents). African data came from 245 population-based surveys (1.2 million participants) for BMI and 76 surveys (182 000 participants) for diabetes prevalence estimates. Countries with the highest number of data sources for BMI were South Africa (n = Continue reading >>

Diabetes Second Biggest Killer Behind Tb In South Africa

Diabetes Second Biggest Killer Behind Tb In South Africa

27/03/2018 15:35 SAST | Updated 27/03/2018 15:35 SAST Diabetes Second Biggest Killer Behind TB In South Africa This according to a report by Statistics South Africa on mortality and causes of death for 2016. Testing a pregnant woman's blood glucose for diabetes using a glucose meter. Diabetes mellitus became the second most common natural cause of death in South Africa for 2016. Tuberculosis remained the leading cause of death in the three-year period from 2014 to 2016, although the proportion of deaths owing to the disease declined in the same period from 8.3 percent to 6.5 percent. This according to Statistics South Africa (Stats SA), which on Tuesday released its report on mortality and causes of death in South Africa for 2016. Its information was based on administrative records from death notification forms accumulated from the department of home affairs. READ: We Are Facing A Tsunami Of A Disease That's Largely Preventable "Diabetes mellitus, which ranked third in 2014 accounting for 5.1 percent of deaths, moved to being the second most common natural cause of death and maintained the same position in 2016, being responsible for 5.5 percent of deaths," the report noted. Tuberculosis accounted for 29,513 deaths in 2016 while 25,255 people died from diabetes. Diseases of the circulatory system were the most common underlying cause of death in 2016, comprising 18.5 percent. "This group has overtaken certain infectious and parasitic diseases in 2016... Diseases of the respiratory system and neoplasm were the third and fourth most common main group of underlying causes responsible for 9.4 percent and 9.3 percent, respectively." A general observation is that age groups 3034 years to 7579 years each represented more than 6 percent of all deaths. From 2006 to 2016, the pr Continue reading >>

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CATEGORY: Population Health, Health Systems and Innovation We all know that more and more people are now living with Type 2 diabetes. It used to be seen as a condition for the wealthy, but today its increasingly common in every community rich and poor. Nicole McCreedy takes a look. Diabetes in South Africa is often associated with the Indian community among whom compared with other cultures it is more widespread. According to a study by the Human Sciences Research Council and Medical Research Council, 61% of South African Indians over the age of 45 have pre-diabetes, and are more likely, with age, to develop Type 2 diabetes. But the Indian community is no longer the only group facing the diabetes challenge. It is now being reported as one of the leading causes of death in areas where diabetes was once unheard of. There are a number of factors that put a person at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. A family history of the condition, your lifestyle what you eat, whether you smoke and how often you exercise as well as your environment all play a role. In the past, the Indian and white population in South Africa were more likely to be urbanised and wealthier, while Africans lived in the rural areas. Living in an urban environment often means longer hours at work, commuting and easy access to cheap fast foods. This type of lifestyle is linked to higher levels of overweight and obesity, and in turn diabetes. A study from 2005 found South African Indians ticked all the boxes: a diet low in fibre and high in unhealthy fats, physical inactivity, and insulin resistance. However, in recent decades, South Africa has undergone both political and economic change. As a result, many people living in rural areas, especially Africans, have moved to cities for work and better opportuni Continue reading >>

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