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Diabetes Statistics Canada 2016

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

About T1D Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that enables people to get energy from food. It occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, called beta cells. While its causes are not yet entirely understood, scientists believe that both genetic factors and environmental triggers are involved. Its onset has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. There is nothing you can do to prevent T1D, and—at present—nothing you can do to get rid of it. Affects Children and Adults T1D strikes both children and adults at any age. It comes on suddenly, causes dependence on injected or pumped insulin for life, and carries the constant threat of devastating complications. Needs Constant Attention Living with T1D is a constant challenge. People with the disease must carefully balance insulin doses (either by injections multiple times a day or continuous infusion through a pump) with eating and daily activities throughout the day and night. They must also test their blood sugar by pricking their fingers for blood six or more times a day. Despite this constant attention, people with T1D still run the risk of dangerous high or low blood sugar levels, both of which can be life-threatening. People with T1D overcome these challenges on a daily basis. Not Cured By Insulin While insulin injections or infusion allow a person with T1D to stay alive, they do not cure the disease, nor do they necessarily prevent the possibility of the disease’s serious effects, which may include: kidney failure, blindness, nerve damage, amputations, heart attack, stroke, and pregnancy complications. Perseverance and Hope Although T1D is a serious and difficult disease, treatment Continue reading >>

Ns Diabetes Statistics Report

Ns Diabetes Statistics Report

Derived from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System (CCDSS), this report provides an overview of the estimated burden of diabetes in Nova Scotia to March 31, 2014 on the population age 20+. The report includes figures related to prevalence (all current cases of diabetes) and incidence (newly diagnosed cases) as well as mortality, morbidity (hypertension), and health services utilization (hospitalizations and visits to primary care providers and specialist physicians) for the population with diabetes as compared to the population without diabetes. Of Note: By March 2014, approximately 11.4% (1 in 9) or 93,000 adults, aged 20+, were living with diabetes. The crude prevalence varied across zones, from 9.7% to 13.6%, with the highest figure for the Eastern Zone. The crude prevalence of diabetes increased with age, and as a result, more than one in four adults over the age of 70 had diabetes. Appendix B, page 67, allows each zone (and former DHA) to benchmark itself against the province as a whole for all measures found in the report. To view/download a published report, please select from the list below. Continue reading >>

Canadian Diabetes Rate Among Highest In Oecd

Canadian Diabetes Rate Among Highest In Oecd

Canada has among the highest rates of diabetes among 34 developed countries, according to two major health reports released Wednesday. Though Canada provides a level of health care comparable to countries with lower diabetes rates, the nation fares poorly in rates of obesity, diet and physical activity — well-known factors in prevention and management of the disease, according to reports from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. More than 3 million Canadians — or 9.4 per cent of the population is estimated to have diabetes (types 1 and 2). Another 5.7 million have prediabetes, a state of above-normal blood sugar levels, which has a high chance of progressing to full diabetes. Canada ranks among the bottom 25 per cent of 34 OECD countries in terms of prevalence, says Katerina Gapanenko, CIHI’s manager of health system research. “We can use these international comparisons to learn from other countries to improve diabetes prevention and management locally. It is important to consider both risk factors for the individual, such as diet and exercise, and for the population, such as income inequality or built environment,” said Gapanenko, with the latter referring, for example, to the walkability of cities. The OECD releases a report on international health indicators every two years. Most of the Canadian data is supplied by CIHI and Statistics Canada. CIHI releases its own report in tandem, closely examining Canada’s ranking among developed countries. This year’s CIHI report focuses closely on diabetes, warning that “without a shift in policies and priorities the prevalence of diabetes is expected to continue to grow.” The OECD report shows that life expectancy at birth in Canada is 81. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Key Statistics[1] 2015 2025 Estimated diabetes prevalence (n/%) 3.4 million/9.3% 5 million/12.1% Estimated prediabetes prevalence in Canada (n/%) (age 20+) 5.7 million/22.1% 6.4 million/23.2% Estimated diabetes prevalence increase (%) 44% from 2015-2025 Estimated diabetes cost increase (%) 25% from 2015-2025 Impact of diabetes Diabetes complications are associated with premature death. It is estimated that one of ten deaths in Canadian adults was attributable to diabetes in 2008/09.[2] People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease and over 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population.[3] Thirty per cent of people with diabetes have clinically relevant depressive symptoms; individuals with depression have an approximately 60% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.3 Foot ulceration affects an estimated 15-25% of people with diabetes. One-third of amputations in 2011-2012 were performed on people reporting a diabetic foot wound.[4] Some populations are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes, such as those of South Asian, Asian, African, Hispanic or Aboriginal descent, those who are overweight, older or have low income. Diabetes rates are 3-5 times higher in First Nations, a situation compounded by barriers to care for Aboriginal people.3 Fifty-seven percent of Canadians with diabetes reported they cannot adhere to prescribed treatment due to the high out-of-pocket cost of needed medications, devices and supplies. The average cost for these supports is >3% of income or >$1,500.[5] As a result of stigma or fear of stigma, 37% of Canadians with type 2 diabetes surveyed by the Cana Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And The Aboriginal Diabetic Initiative In Canada: An Update Review

Diabetes Mellitus And The Aboriginal Diabetic Initiative In Canada: An Update Review

Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease of major global health concern due to its increasing prevalence in both developing and developed counties, with a projection increase of 214% from the year 2000 to 2030. Among the Aboriginal population of Canada (which includes the First Nations, Inuit and Metis), diabetes mellitus contribute significantly to their higher morbidity and increased health disparity when compared to the non-Aboriginal Canadians. In view of this, the Federal Government of Canada had launched the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative (ADI) in 1999 as part of the bigger Canadian Diabetes Strategy to provide a better framework for surveillance, public education and community-based management of diabetes. Originally, ADI was intended for a 5-year cycle, but it was renewed twice in 2005 and then 2010, with a total funding of C$523 million. Given its long history of operation and the massive amount of revenue being injected, it is worthwhile to review the background information and the relevant data that had fostered the ADI; and more importantly, to critically evaluate the benefits and impact of the ADI in terms of the actual health of the Aboriginals and their social inequalities. Keywords: Aboriginal diabetes initiative, Aboriginals, Canada, diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes, 2015

Diabetes, 2015

In 2015, 6.9% of Canadians aged 12 and older (roughly 2.1 million people) reported being diagnosed with diabetes.1 Overall, males (7.8%) were more likely than females (5.9%) to report that they had diabetes.2 Diabetes increased with age3 for both males and females up to age 64. The prevalence did not increase significantly for those aged 75 or older (Chart 1). The proportion of residents aged 12 and older who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was lower than the national average (6.9%) in Alberta (4.7%).4 The proportion of residents who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was higher than the national average in: Newfoundland and Labrador (10.5%) Nova Scotia (10.1%) New Brunswick (8.8%) The proportion of residents who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was about the same as the national average in the other provinces. Canadians aged 18 and older who were either overweight or obese were more likely than those who were classified as having a normal weight5 to report that they had been diagnosed with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes among obese Canadians was 13.6% in 2015, compared with 6.6% among overweight Canadians and 3.2% among those classified as having a normal weight. Start of text box Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the insulin produced is not used effectively. Diabetes may lead to a reduced quality of life as well as complications such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.6 Survey respondents were asked to report if they had been diagnosed with diabetes by a health professional. Included in the reports were: type 1, which is usually diagnosed in children and adolescents; type 2, which usually develops in adulthood; and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy. End of text box References James, Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Banting and Best Laboratory Banting and Best's laboratory where insulin was discovered (courtesy University of Toronto Archives/A1965-0004). Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a disease in which the body either produces insufficient amounts of insulin or cannot use insulin properly. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Treatment for the disease received a monumental breakthrough when a team of researchers at the University of Toronto (Frederick Banting, Charles Best, John Macleod and James Collip) isolated insulin between 1921 and 1922. Background and Symptoms Everyone needs insulin to break down food. What and how much someone eats affects blood glucose levels. When someone has diabetes, there is either not enough insulin in the body or the body cannot use the insulin it produces. Rather than being used as energy, glucose in a diabetic person is stored in the body’s cells and collects in the bloodstream. Over time, elevated blood glucose can cause serious damage to the body. Specific symptoms include fatigue, thirst, frequent urination, damage to nerves, blurred vision and muscle cramps. Even when diabetes is controlled, the insulin supply of the body is limited. Types of Diabetes There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, as well as related conditions including prediabetes and gestational diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Medical illustration of the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. 29046518 © Rob3000 | Dreamstime.com Type 1 diabetes is found in 10 per cent of people with diabetes. Also known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, type 1 was formerly called juvenile-onset diabetes because it generally develops at a young age. Autoimmunity is a major cause of type 1 diabetes, meaning that the body mistakenly Continue reading >>

Health Status Of Canadians 2016: Report Of The Chief Public Health Officer - How Are We Unhealthy? - Diabetes

Health Status Of Canadians 2016: Report Of The Chief Public Health Officer - How Are We Unhealthy? - Diabetes

How are we unhealthy? Diabetes In 2011, almost almost 2.7 million or 1 in 10 Canadians 20 years and older were living with diagnosed diabetes (type 1, type 2) as measured through hospitalizations or physician claims (see Figure 1)1. Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in Canada and is linked to a variety of complications (e.g., amputations, loss of vision) and other diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease, kidney disease).2 Age, obesity and physical inactivity are some of the many risk factors for type 2 diabetes.2 Over time Data adjusted by age and collected from hospitalizations and physicians claims show that:1 6% of Canadians 20 years and older had been diagnosed with diabetes by 2000. 10% of Canadians 20 years and older had been diagnosed with diabetes by 2011. Self-reported data are lower than data collected through hospitalizations and physician claims, but show the same general trend. The proportion of Canadians 12 years and older who reported being diagnosed with diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational) at some point in their life has been increasing (see Figure 2)1. Data from hospitalizations and physician claims may be more accurate; however, are not available to make comparisons by sex, income, age and in Indigenous populations. For these analyses (see below), self-reported data are used. By sex In 2014, the proportion of Canadians 12 years and older who reported living with diabetes was 6% for men and 5% for women based on age-adjusted data (see Figure 2)3. Percent of Canadians who report living with diabetes by age group, 2013-2014Footnote 11 12 to 19 years 20 to 34 years 35 to 44 years 45 to 64 years 65 years and older Tableau 1 footnotes Table 1 footnote a High sampling variability. Interpret with caution Return to table 1 footnote a refer Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The presence of diabetes is based on the population aged 12 or older who reported that a health professional diagnosed them as having diabetes. This includes females 15 or older who reported that they have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. The definition does not distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Diabetes is an important indicator of population health because of its increasing prevalence, association with lifestyle risk factors, and far-reaching consequences. Common complications include heart disease and stroke, vision problems or blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage1. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide2. Formerly considered a disease of adults and the elderly, it is now appearing in children3,4. The burdens imposed by diabetes include shortened life expectancy and fewer years lived in good health, as well as health care costs for those afflicted. The aging population is the most important demographic change affecting diabetes prevalence worldwide. Even if incidence rates were to remain stable, because of the growing number of seniors, the overall prevalence of diabetes would increase2,5. Being overweight or obese is an important risk factor for diabetes6. Rising percentages of Canadians in these categories7 could increase the prevalence of diabetes. Physical activity reduces the risk of developing diabetes and inhibits the progression of the disease by increasing sensitivity to insulin. Even when body mass index (BMI) and other factors were taken into account, diabetes incidence was higher among inactive people5. Family history (parent or sibling with diabetes) was associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes5. While this may indicate a genetic predisposition, shared behaviours and increased awareness that Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

Go to: Methods Diabetes risk and incidence To estimate the predicted risk and number of new diabetes cases within the next 10 years, we used the Diabetes Population Risk Tool version 2.0. DPoRT 2.0 is an updated iteration of DPoRT, a predictive algorithm developed to calculate future population risk and incidence of physician- diagnosed diabetes in those aged 20 years and over. DPoRT was derived using national survey data individually linked to a chart-validated diabetes registry. This cohort was then used to create sex-specific survival models using baseline risk factors from the survey for diabetes incidence. Specifically, we assessed the probability of physician-diagnosed diabetes from the interview date until censoring for death or end of follow-up. The model was developed in the Ontario cohort and predictions from the model were validated against actual observed diabetes incidence in two external cohorts in Ontario and Manitoba. Variables used within its two sex-specific models include a combination of hypertension, ethnicity, education, immigrant status, body mass index, smoking status, heart disease and income. Full details on the model specification and validation can be found elsewhere. 7 The regression model can run on nationally available population health surveys and has been updated (DPoRT 2.0) and used to established prevention targets for diabetes.8 For this study, we used DPoRT 2.0 to generate incidence predictions based on the recent 2011 and 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). The CCHS collects information on the demographics, health status and determinants of health of the Canadian population. It is a nationally representative survey that uses a crosssectional study design and is administered on an ongoing basis, with annual data reporting. Continue reading >>

Doctor Calls For National Plan To Tackle Seniors' Diabetes Rates

Doctor Calls For National Plan To Tackle Seniors' Diabetes Rates

Last Updated Thursday, January 7, 2016 8:49PM EST VANCOUVER -- Diabetes among seniors is part of a "silent global tsunami" but a national strategy developed in Canada a decade ago has never been implemented, says a doctor working to raise awareness about the chronic disease. Dr. David C.W. Lau is asking the federal government to take action, adding one in five people aged 65 and over is being diagnosed with diabetes compared to one in 10 cases among younger adults. "We don't have specific statistics in Canada," Lau said, adding diabetes rates are identified through "unreliable" physicians' billing data. "We really don't have a proper surveillance program or a tracking system to diagnose people and we don't have a registry of people with diabetes," said Lau, who teaches medicine at the University of Calgary. However, he said the available statistics show that the highest rates of Type 2 diabetes are among residents in the Maritime provinces while the lowest are in British Columbia, primarily due to differences in obesity rates. China, India and the United States are poised to have the biggest increase in the number of adults with diabetes, he said, attributing the hike in developing countries to sedentary lifestyles as more people move to urban areas and eat western-style fast food. "One of my new scientist colleagues who went back to China said that at a gala dinner he was absolutely appalled to find that every single physician and researcher was comparing the pills that they were taking. They all had diabetes." Lau, editor-in-chief of the "Canadian Journal of Diabetes," said in an editorial in the current issue that better diagnosis and management of the disease is needed to curtail spiralling health-care costs from complications such as kidney failure and blindness. " Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

N.l. Still Has Highest Rates Of Diabetes In Canada, New Report Says

N.l. Still Has Highest Rates Of Diabetes In Canada, New Report Says

Newfoundland and Labrador still tops the list with the highest rates of diabetes in the country, according to a new report from the Canadian Diabetes Association. "If we don't do anything about this, what will those rates be in 2026?" asks Jake Reid, director of government relations and advocacy with the association's Atlantic Canada branch. The association released its Newfoundland and Labrador 2016 report on Wednesday. It estimates that about 179,000 people in the province — about 35 per cent of the population — are either living with pre-diabetes, diabetes, or undiagnosed diabetes. If nothing changes, Reid predicts that number will go up to 214,000 in the next decade. "We look at prevention of Type 2 diabetes and we look at prevention of complications of diabetes, if you have it now," Reid told the Central Morning Show. "And really, they're the same thing because the actions that you would take to prevent diabetes are the same things that would help you live well if you have diabetes." Preventative measures are key The report says the province also has high rates of risk factors which can be modified that contribute to diabetes. Approximately 67 per cent of adults and 47 per cent of youth are overweight or obese. More than one in five people smoke cigarettes, half of the population are deemed physically inactive, and more than 70 per cent do not eat enough fruits and vegetables. Some non-preventative factors that are increasing the rates in Newfoundland and Labrador include an aging population, ethnic backgrounds and genetic factors, Reid said. "You can live well with diabetes and that's a really important message," said Reid. "But if you don't, and you aren't well-managed, it can lead to all sorts of difficulties." Those difficulties include strokes, heart attac Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Canada: Facts And Figures From A Public Health Perspective

Diabetes In Canada: Facts And Figures From A Public Health Perspective

This 2011 report provides the most recent diabetes statistics in Canada. It presents rates of the disease (type 1 and type 2 combined) by age group, sex, province and over time, its consequences on the health of affected individuals, and health care utilisation related with diabetes. The report offers statistics on risk factors for developing diabetes and its complications, including obesity/overweight, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and smoking. Information on diabetes among children and youth and Aboriginal populations is also presented. Table of contents Editorial board members Scientific reviewers Acknowledgements A few words from the Chief Public Health Officer Chapter 1 – The burden of diabetes in Canada Chapter 2 – The health impact of diabetes on Canadians Complications associated with diabetes Chapter 3 – The health system and economic impact of diabetes Chapter 4 – Reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes and its complications Chapter 5 – Diabetes in children and youth Chapter 6 – Diabetes among First Nations, Inuit, and Métis populations List of figures Chapter 1 Figure 1-1. Prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among individuals aged one year and older, by age group and sex, Canada, 2008/09 Figure 1-2. Age-standardized prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among individuals aged one year and older, by province/territory, Canada, 2008/09 Figure 1-3. Age-standardized prevalence and number of cases of diagnosed diabetes among individuals aged one year and older, Canada, 1998/99 to 2008/09 Figure 1-4. Prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among individuals aged one year and older, by age group, Canada, 1998/99 to 2008/09 Figure 1-5. Incidence rates of diagnosed diabetes among individuals aged one year and older, by age group and sex, Canada, 2008/09 Figure 1-6. Continue reading >>

The Projection Of Prevalence And Cost Of Diabetes In Canada: 2000 To 2016

The Projection Of Prevalence And Cost Of Diabetes In Canada: 2000 To 2016

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to project the prevalence and cost of diabetes mellitus in Canada and its provinces for the years 2000 to 2016. METHOD: The total costs per capita, including hospitalizations, day procedures, physician services, prescription drugs and estimated outpatient dialysis services, for individuals with diabetes were measured using 1996 administrative data from Saskatchewan Health, Saskatchewan, Canada, and organized within 5-year age groups. The general population projection was based on the Statistics Canada provincial median population projections from 2000 to 2016. Diabetes incidence, prevalence and mortality projections for this time period were obtained from previous projection estimates for Manitoba, Canada. RESULTS: The number of individuals with diabetes in the general population in Canada will increase from approximately 1.4 milhon patients in 2000 to 2.4 million patients in 2016. The total healthcare costs are projected to increase from Can $4.66 billion in 2000 to S8.14 billion in 2016 (1996 dollar values). Important differences in diabetes-related cost trends were noted across provinces and territories. CONCLUSION: The projection model used in this study showed that if the increase in the prevalence of diabetes follows current trends, healthcare costs for people with diabetes in Canada will increase by 75% between 2000 and 2016. Discover the world's research 14+ million members 100+ million publications 700k+ research projects Join for free incident cases, modelling, mortality, prevalent cases ners. Available estimates, however, have been based on Newfoundland 79.4 94.0 111.3 135.4 70.5 -4.3 64.8 Nunavut 1.4 2.0 2.8 3.7 170.1 27.1 146.3 Canada by diabetes status (i.e. incident, prevalent or death cases), 2000–201 Continue reading >>

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