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Diabetes Statistics 2017

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Abstract The “Diabesity” epidemic (obesity and type 2 diabetes) is likely to be the biggest epidemic in human history. Diabetes has been seriously underrated as a global public health issue and the world can no longer ignore “the rise and rise” of type 2 diabetes. Currently, most of the national and global diabetes estimates come from the IDF Atlas. These estimates have significant limitations from a public health perspective. It is apparent that the IDF have consistently underestimated the global burden. More reliable estimates of the future burden of diabetes are urgently needed. To prevent type 2 diabetes, a better understanding of the drivers of the epidemic is needed. While for years, there has been comprehensive attention to the “traditional” risk factors for type 2 diabetes i.e., genes, lifestyle and behavioral change, the spotlight is turning to the impact of the intra-uterine environment and epigenetics on future risk in adult life. It highlights the urgency for discovering novel approaches to prevention focusing on maternal and child health. Diabetes risk through epigenetic changes can be transmitted inter-generationally thus creating a vicious cycle that will continue to feed the diabetes epidemic. History provides important lessons and there are lessons to learn from major catastrophic events such as the Dutch Winter Hunger and Chinese famines. The Chinese famine may have been the trigger for what may be viewed as a diabetes “avalanche” many decades later. The drivers of the epidemic are indeed genes and environment but they are now joined by deleterious early life events. Looking to the future there is the potential scenario of future new “hot spots” for type 2 diabetes in regions e.g., the Horn of Africa, now experiencing droughts and f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

15 Things We Learned From The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report

15 Things We Learned From The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report

An estimated 10 percent of the United States population has diabetes, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control. Of the 30.3 million people included in that estimate, 23.1 million people have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The remaining 7.2 likely have diabetes without knowing it. (The report did not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but with 90 to 95 percent of diagnosed diabetes being type 2, the statistics presented are more representative of the type 2 population.) Here are some of the highlights from this CDC report. 25.2 percent of people aged 65 years or older have diabetes, compared with 17 percent of people aged 45 to 64 and 4 percent of people aged 18 to 44. 1.5 million new cases of adult diabetes were diagnosed in 2015 (or 6.7 per 1,000 people). More than half of these cases were in people aged between 45 and 64. 84.1 million people had prediabetes in 2015, which is about 33.9 percent of U.S. adults older than 18. “Nearly half (48.3%) of adults aged 65 years or older had prediabetes,” the report said. More men have diabetes than women: 36.3 percent versus 29.3 percent. One area in which the report did differentiate type 1 from type 2 was in reference to rates of diabetes in children. Using data from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, they determined that 17,900 people under the age of 20 years old were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 2011 and 2012. 5,300 children between the ages of 10 and 19 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the same time frame. “Among children and adolescents younger than age 20 years, non-Hispanic whites had the highest rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes compared to members of other U.S. racial and ethnic groups,” the report stated. “Among children an Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes And Prediabetes In 15 States Of India: Results From The Icmr–indiab Population-based Cross-sectional Study

Prevalence Of Diabetes And Prediabetes In 15 States Of India: Results From The Icmr–indiab Population-based Cross-sectional Study

Summary Previous studies have not adequately captured the heterogeneous nature of the diabetes epidemic in India. The aim of the ongoing national Indian Council of Medical Research–INdia DIABetes study is to estimate the national prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes in India by estimating the prevalence by state. We used a stratified multistage design to obtain a community-based sample of 57 117 individuals aged 20 years or older. The sample population represented 14 of India's 28 states (eight from the mainland and six from the northeast of the country) and one union territory. States were sampled in a phased manner: phase I included Tamil Nadu, Chandigarh, Jharkhand, and Maharashtra, sampled between Nov 17, 2008, and April 16, 2010; phase II included Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Gujarat, Karnataka, and Punjab, sampled between Sept 24, 2012, and July 26, 2013; and the northeastern phase included Assam, Mizoram, Arunachal Pradesh, Tripura, Manipur, and Meghalaya, with sampling done between Jan 5, 2012, and July 3, 2015. Capillary oral glucose tolerance tests were used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes in accordance with WHO criteria. Our methods did not allow us to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes in different states was assessed in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) of individuals and the per-capita gross domestic product (GDP) of each state. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to examine the association of various factors with the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes. The overall prevalence of diabetes in all 15 states of India was 7·3% (95% CI 7·0–7·5). The prevalence of diabetes varied from 4·3% in Bihar (95% CI 3·7–5·0) to 10·0% (8·7–11·2) in Punjab and was higher in urban areas (11·2%, 10 Continue reading >>

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4 percent of the U.S. population –have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. The report confirms that the rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady. However, the disease continues to represent a growing health problem: Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015. The report also includes county-level data for the first time, and shows that some areas of the country bear a heavier diabetes burden than others. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including premature death, vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, released approximately every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality, and costs in the U.S. Key findings from Continue reading >>

Epidemiology & Research

Epidemiology & Research

IDF is the global reference for accurate, up-to-date estimates of the prevalence of diabetes and its burden on individuals and health economies. Our prevention initiatives aim to help stem the ever increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes and promote specific models of care and resources to support optimal management of people with diabetes. The IDF Diabetes Atlas is the authoritative resource on the global burden of diabetes. First published in 2000, it is produced by IDF in collaboration with experts from around the world and contains data on diabetes cases, prevalence, mortality and expenditure on the global, regional and national level. A full IDF Diabetes Atlas report is produced every two years. The next edition of the IDF Diabetes Atlas will be published in November 2017. IDF BRIDGES (Bringing Research in Diabetes to Global Environments and Systems) is an International Diabetes Federation programme, supported by an educational grant from Lilly Diabetes. IDF BRIDGES funds translational research projects in primary and secondary prevention of diabetes to provide the opportunity to ‘translate’ lessons learned from clinical research to those who can benefit most: people affected by diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes

What Is Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or when the body cannot make good use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, that acts like a key to let glucose from the food we eat pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to produce energy. All carbohydrate foods are broken down into glucose in the blood. Insulin helps glucose get into the cells. Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively leads to raised glucose levels in the blood (known as hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high glucose levels are associated with damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues. Continue reading >>

25 Must Know Statistics About Amputation Due To Diabetes

25 Must Know Statistics About Amputation Due To Diabetes

Diabetes is a common medical condition in the United States – at least 9% of Americans are living with diabetes.[i] Diabetes affects many areas of the body. If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you need to be aware of your feet and watch out for diabetic foot ulcers. What are diabetic foot ulcers? Diabetic foot ulcers are sores that develop on your feet, and they can develop even from seemingly trivial injuries to the feet. Diabetic foot ulcers are a common cause of amputation due to diabetes. If you’re wondering about diabetic foot amputation statistics, be warned: these statistics may seem discouraging. But keep in mind that information can be empowering, and these stats emphasize the importance of seeking medical care for foot ulcers as soon as you notice them. The list also highlights the close connection between peripheral artery disease (PAD), which involves the blockage of the blood vessels in the legs, and what the likelihood is that diabetic foot ulcers will heal. Hopefully this knowledge will remind you to take care of your feet if you have diabetes. If you have a diabetic foot ulcer that hasn’t been treated, show it to your doctor as soon as possible. 25 Statistics Every Person Living with Diabetes Must Know About Amputation Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Amputation There are some surprising statistics about how common diabetic foot ulcers are, how often they can lead to amputation and the ultimate cost of having a foot ulcer that results in an amputation. 1. A foot ulcer is the initial event in more than 85% of major amputations that are performed on people with diabetes.[ii] 2. In the United States, every year about 73,000 amputations of the lower limb not related to trauma are performed on people with diabetes.[i] 3. Of non-traumatic amputations in th Continue reading >>

2017 Diabetes Facts & Statistics

2017 Diabetes Facts & Statistics

Diabetes costs the U.S. economy over $245 billion per year, making it the country’s most expensive disease. But the damage obviously extends well beyond dollars and cents. It’s the 3rd most deadly disease in the U.S., claiming over 80,000 lives per year and becoming a daily concern for millions more. Yet the roughly 9 in 10 Americans who don’t have diabetes probably don’t understand the full extent of the struggle, either. The same can also be said of the nearly 1 in 4 people with diabetes who don’t know they have it. So to help spread awareness, WalletHub assembled an interesting infographic exploring the impact of the disease as well as what folks are doing to fight back. We also surveyed a panel of diabetes experts about issues ranging from personal finance to policy. You can find everything below. Ask The Experts: Dealing With & Defeating Diabetes For insights into how we can reduce the many costs of diabetes, WalletHub posed the following questions to a panel of experts. You can check out their bios and responses below. What are the warning signs that someone may have Type 1 Diabetes? What about Type 2? What steps can someone take today to help reduce diabetes risk? What should public officials do to raise awareness about diabetes and the need for screening? What are some common myths or misunderstandings people have about diabetes? How have individuals with diabetes fared under the Affordable Care Act? What tips do you have for a person with Type 2 diabetes looking to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle while on a budget? Continue reading >>

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One third of Americans may be on their way to developing full-blown type 2 diabetes, and most of them don't even know it. A recent report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that more than 84 million Americans, or roughly one-third of the population, have prediabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. Of that group, 90 percent aren't aware they have the condition. The primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle — excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this alarming medical trend. "People with prediabetes who don't change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and can develop type 2 diabetes within five years if left untreated," said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical & mission officer of the American Diabetes Association. The health risks go beyond heart disease and stroke. As diabetes worsens over time, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation are also major health risks. Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, according to the CDC. This population of diabetes "ticking time bombs" is particularly alarming, because in many cases type 2 diabetes can be avoided, simply by leading a healthy lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is often progressive, and within 10 years of diagnosis, 50 percent of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels, according to the ADA. More than 30 million Americans — 9.4 percent of the U.S. population — are already battling diabetes, according to the CDC's National Diabetes Statistics Report, which used data through 2015. The CDC found that of those cases, 7.2 million were undiagnosed. "The country needs to take this seriously, ratc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

Overweight & Obesity Statistics

This content describes the prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States. Defining Overweight and Obesity A person whose weight is higher than what is considered as a normal weight adjusted for height is described as being overweight or having obesity.1 Fast Facts According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2013–20142,3,4,5 More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight. More than 2 in 3 adults were considered to be overweight or have obesity. More than 1 in 3 adults were considered to have obesity. About 1 in 13 adults were considered to have extreme obesity. About 1 in 6 children and adolescents ages 2 to 19 were considered to have obesity. Using Body Mass Index (BMI) to Estimate Overweight and Obesity BMI is the tool most commonly used to estimate and screen for overweight and obesity in adults and children. BMI is defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. For most people, BMI is related to the amount of fat in their bodies, which can raise the risk of many health problems. A health care professional can determine if a person’s health may be at risk because of his or her weight. The tables below show BMI ranges for overweight and obesity. Adults An online tool for gauging the BMIs of adults can be found at: Children and Adolescents BMI of Children and Adolescents Ages 2 to 19 BMI Classification At or above the 85th percentile on the CDC growth charts Overweight or obesity At or above the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Obesity (including extreme obesity) At or above 120 percent of the 95th percentile on the CDC growth charts Extreme obesity Children grow at different rates at different times, so it is not always easy to tell if a child is overweight. The CDC BMI gro Continue reading >>

Complete Health Indicator Report Of Diabetes Prevalence

Complete Health Indicator Report Of Diabetes Prevalence

Definition Percentage of Utah adults (18+) diagnosed with diabetes. Numerator Number of Utah adults who reported being told by a health care professional that they have diabetes (excludes women who were told they had diabetes only during pregnancy or those who reported they had "borderline" or prediabetes). Denominator Utah adults 18 and over. Data Interpretation Issues The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the primary source for estimating diabetes prevalence for Utah. The BRFSS is a telephone survey (with interviews using both landline and cell phones) that includes only adults 18 and over. Why Is This Important? Almost 145,000 Utahns have been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a disease that can have devastating consequences. It is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower-extremity amputation and renal failure. It is also the leading cause of blindness among adults younger than 75. It is one of the leading causes of heart disease. Diabetes places an enormous burden on health care resources, approximately $245 billion is spent annually [in direct medical costs ($176 billion) and in indirect costs ($69 billion) such as disability, work loss, and premature death]. (See Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012). In Utah, more than a billion dollars each year are spent on direct and indirect costs of diabetes. A model using simulated data projected that diabetes incidence will increase from the current rate of 8 cases per 1,000 population to about 15 in 2050 nationwide. Prevalence of diabetes (including undiagnosed cases) can be as high as one of three Americans by 2050 (see Currently, about 80 million Americans aged 20 and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that puts them at high risk for developing diabetes. For many individuals, taking sm Continue reading >>

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Implementation and evaluation of diabetes prevention and control programs depends on reliable data. The following data sources tell us how many people in Texas are estimated to have diabetes and the groups most affected by the disease. They allow for development of culturally appropriate messages and assist in focusing prevention efforts on high-risk populations. The Diabetes Program at DSHS develops epidemiological reports on diabetes incidence, prevalence, morbidity, and mortality in Texas. The program contracts for annual statewide telephone surveys through the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, participates in statewide and international collaborative data collection projects, and reviews information from the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) and the TMF Health Quality Institute, which is the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization. Data from these and other sources are collected and illustrated in the burden report below. The Diabetes Program updates this report periodically as data collection occurs and data is verified for publication. The Texas Diabetes Fact Sheet offers at-a-glance diabetes prevalence and mortality statistics for Texas by race/ethnicity, age, and gender. Requests for specific data will be addressed as time and availability of data permit. To ensure that data requests are fulfilled in a timely manner, please submit your requests at least two weeks before the data is needed. Texas Diabetes and Prediabetes Fact Sheet (Updated September 2017, 178kb, PDF viewing information) Diabetes and prediabetes prevalence, mortality, and cost data for Texas. Diabetes Trend Data, Texas and US, 2011-2015 (Updated March 2017, PDF 923kb, PDF viewing information) Current Diabetes Prevalence Among Adults by Demographic C Continue reading >>

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