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Diabetes Sport Management

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

An even playing field is all most parents hope for as their children enter organized sports. Most of us dont expect our child to be the next LeBron James, but we do want our young ones to have a shot at success just like everyone else. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If your child has diabetes, it doesnt have to hold him or her back from sports. It just requires that parents, medical staff and coaches work together to ensure optimal health of the young athlete. With proper outpatient management, a winning game plan is doable. Diabetes is incredibly common, says orthopaedic specialist Dominic King, DO . If you have an organized way to coach young athletes, you should have an organized way to treat athletes with diabetes. Control is the operative word, Dr. King says. The management of a child athlete with diabetes is very similar to managing any child who is an athlete, Dr. King says. Just like you watch all athletes for injuries, you have to watch diabetic athletes for hypo- or hyperglycemia. With strict attention to blood glucose concentration, diet and hydration , most sports and activities are fair game for children with diabetes. There are no real limitations to activity, Dr. King says. In fact, there are some specific benefits in regards to improved blood glucose control and an overall healthy lifestyle. There are a few more extreme sporting activities such as rock climbing, skydiving or scuba diving that you would probably want your child to avoid if he or she has diabetes. Dr. King warns against anything that, if you passed out during the activity, you could be in life-threatening danger. Also, make sure that your childs Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Endurance Sports

Diabetes And Endurance Sports

Published September 6, 2017 Regular, moderate exercise can help prevent Type 2 diabetes and reduce or slow complications from Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. But what about more intense physical activity such as endurance sports including marathons and triathlons? With healthy training and nutrition management to meet individualized goals, people with diabetes can achieve improved blood glucose control and fewer hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) episodes while participating in endurance sports. When it comes to sports, diabetes management always is the first priority. First, talk to your diabetes doctor about an insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor and pre-training medical testing. Determine your safe blood glucose range for training and competing. Once you've gotten the go-ahead from your doctor, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist specializing in sports and diabetes care. Avoiding hypoglycemia is important before, during and after endurance training. If blood sugar is 70 to 100 mg/dl before exercise, then a snack that includes 15 grams of carbohydrate is recommended. For exercise that lasts longer than 60 minutes, additional carbohydrate may be needed to keep blood sugar within a safe range. When starting an endurance sport, follow these five tips: Check your blood sugar frequently, and stay in the blood glucose range that you and your physician decide upon. Always carry a quickly absorbable form of glucose glucose tablets, sports drinks, gels or energy bars when training. Train with a partner until you are skilled at avoiding hypoglycemia. Wear a medical alert ID bracelet, or any medical tag that helps alert paramedics or emergency responders of your diabetes and any additional important medical condition that may require immediate or special attention. Eat and Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

People with diabetes can exercise and play sports at the same level as everyone else. But some don't. Take Olympic gold-medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr., for instance. He definitely doesn't swim like an average person. And pro golfers Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann don't putt like the folks at your local mini golf, either. All of these athletes deal with diabetes while wiping out the competition. Get the idea? Whether you want to go for the gold or just go hiking in your hometown, diabetes shouldn't hold you back. reduces your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer improves coordination, balance, strength, and endurance helps insulin work better in the body, which helps blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range burns calories, which helps you reach and stay at a healthy weight teaches you about teamwork, competition, and courage relieves tension and stress, relaxes you, and boosts your mood, too can even help you clear your mind and focus your attention better All exercise is great whether it's walking the dog or playing team sports. Just be sure to do it every day. Changing exercise habits can be hard for everyone at first. But most people say that once they start feeling the benefits, they're hooked. After that, it's a lot easier to keep going. But there are some facts you need to know about exercise and diabetes. The muscles need more energy during exercise, so the body releases extra sugar, or glucose . For people with diabetes, this can have some side effects. For example, if the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose that's released during exercise, then the glucose stays in the blood, which leads to high blood sugar levels. This is called hyperglycemia (pronounced: hy-pur-gly-SEE-mee-uh). Not having enough insulin to use the sugar in the blood Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes At High Altitude | British Journal Of Sports Medicine

Management Of Diabetes At High Altitude | British Journal Of Sports Medicine

Editor,In response to the leader of Moore et al, 1 we would like to report the results obtained in eight type I diabetic mountaineers who ascended the Aconcagua (6950 m)2 without any significant medical problems. The only climber unable to make the summit, because of a problem not related to diabetes, reached 6700 m. None of the climbers took any drugs to prevent acute mountain sickness (AMS) because of the possible risks. Instead, they acclimatised gradually. Above 5000 m some of the diabetic climbers experienced hypoglycaemia after dinner with nocturnal hyperglycaemia probably because of delayed absorption of carbohydrates at altitude and rapid absorption of the Lispro Insulin used by most of the group. We recommended delaying the administration of insulin until the end of dinner. There were no problems with glucometers. The devices were protected with home made bags and carried next to the skin. As expected, all members of the team suffered bouts of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia but were managed successfully. Glycaemia was monitored on average seven times a day. The expedition doctor had to intervene in only one case of medium postprandial hypoglycaemia at 5000 m. In a previous investigation of type I diabetic climbers, 15 out of 24 of the climbers reached altitudes above 5000 m (three above 7000 m). None reported major complications at altitude nor taking any drugs to prevent AMS. In climbs under 3000 m, hyperglycaemia caused by dehydration (two cases) or extensive sunburn (one case) were reported; all were self managed and resolved before the climbers reached hospital. One climber had previously measured his glycaemia at a height of 8200 m on Mount Everest. He tested the glucometer in the hypobaric chamber at 5000 m without any significant differences from sea Continue reading >>

Sports Nutrition And Diabetes

Sports Nutrition And Diabetes

There remains to date little specific research into Type 1 diabetes and sports nutrition, however the principles for non-diabetic athletes remain largely transferable provided the differences in physiology are recognised. Research and practice have pushed established boundaries, where medicine and society regarded Diabetes as a disability. With insulin therapy approaching its centenary there are emerging generations of ever more informed, motivated, physically fit and accomplished athletes with diabetes who now compete at all levels including elite and professional. Basic Physiology A common misconception in practice is the need to eat before exercise; in reality, even the leanest of athletes have fuel reserves in the forms of creatine phosphate, glucose, glycogen and fat; varying intensities and duration of exercise utilise different energy oxidation pathways and require different nutritional approaches. The advice for the general population and particularly people with Type 2 diabetes, is to exercise regularly, not only to ‘burn’ calories and promote weight loss, but activity at least every other day prolongs expression of GLUT4 insulin-independent receptors, thereby reducing insulin resistance and basal requirements. This reduction in requirements is also true of Type 1 and has been associated with an extended ‘honeymoon’ period in some active individuals. As insulin is not under homeostatic control in Type 1, athletes must be vigilant as to the effects of increasing training level. More frequent blood glucose monitoring is necessary to monitor the effects of exercise and devise appropriate strategies. Before Exercise General rules for moderate intensity exercise 45-240minutes[1] :- Initial BG level mmol/l Grams of carbohydrate pre-exercise < 7 20-30 7-10 10- Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports Regular exercise is highly recommended for many people who have either Type 1 DM or Type 2 DM diabetes. During exercise there is a rapid uptake of glucose from the blood and people with diabetes must adjust their pre-exercise insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake, before, during and after exercise. The benefits of regular exercise in people with diabetes are similar to those in persons without the disease as long as the diabetic is in good glucose control and has no major complications of the disease. Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports People with diabetes mellitusrapidly approaching one-third of the US populationeither cannot produce insulin (Type 1 DM) or the insulin they produce is ineffective in stimulating the uptake of blood sugar (glucose) into the bodys cells (Type 2 DM). Accordingly, if diabetes is untreated, blood sugar rises to dangerously high levels that can eventually cause blindness, nerve damage, and other complications. Blood sugar can be controlled by the appropriate administration of insulin and other drugs and/or by the manipulation of dietary carbohydrate and exercise. During exercise, the contracting muscles produce their own insulin-like effect, causing the rapid uptake of glucose from the blood. In people without diabetes, the body naturally reduces its production of insulin to compensate; otherwise, blood glucose would fall precipitously. (A low blood glucose concentration is known as hypoglycemia.) Those with Type 1 DM (and those with Type 2 DM who use insulin to control their blood sugar) must adjust their pre-exercise insulin dosage and their carbohydrate intake before, during, and after exercise to avoid becoming hypoglycemic. Regular exercise traini Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Cardiac Rehabilitation And Secondary Prevention Programs: Education, Monitoring, And Management Of Patients With Diabetes

Guidelines For Cardiac Rehabilitation And Secondary Prevention Programs: Education, Monitoring, And Management Of Patients With Diabetes

This is an excerpt from Guidelines for Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention Programs Fifth Edition (With Web Resource) by AACVPR. Education, Monitoring, and Management of Patients With Diabetes There are a number of precautions and special instructions for exercise in persons with diabetes as listed in General Precautions for Patients With Diabetes. Complications involving the feet are common in people with diabetes; therefore foot care is an important consideration. Problems most often develop in patients with peripheral neuropathy of legs and feet and when blood flow is compromised. Such problems can include extremely dry skin that may peel or crack; calluses that may ulcerate; and foot ulcers, particularly at the ball of the foot or at the base of the big toe. Patients should be routinely taught to inspect their feet and report any sores, infections, or inflammation to their health care provider. In addition to regular inquiry by the health care staff regarding foot health, initial assessment for peripheral neuropathies and pulses should be performed. CR/SP staff should instruct patients on routine foot care.12 General precautions for patients with diabetes are covered in the following list. General Precautions for Patients With Diabetes Avoid vigorous exercise before blood glucose has been adequately controlled. Have knowledge and awareness of the signs, symptoms, and management of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia; exercise late in the evening may increase risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia. Some medications may mask or exacerbate exercise-related hypo- or hyperglycemia, including beta-blockers, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, and warfarin. Always carry a carbohydrate (CHO) source. Avoid exercise at time of peak insulin effect; alternatively, consume a CH Continue reading >>

[management Of Type 1 Diabetes (insulin, Diet, Sport):

[management Of Type 1 Diabetes (insulin, Diet, Sport): "dorchy's Recipes"].

1. Rev Med Brux. 2010;31(2 Suppl):S37-53. [Management of type 1 diabetes (insulin, diet, sport): "Dorchy's recipes"]. (1)Clinique de Diabtologie, Hpital Universitaire Des Enfants Reine Fabiola, ULB, Bruxelles. [email protected] The principal aims of therapeutic management of the child, adolescent and adultwith type 1 diabetes are to allow good quality of life and to avoid long-termcomplications by maintaining blood glucose concentrations close to the normalrange and an HbA1c level under 7%. The number of daily insulin injections, 2 or >or = 4, by itself does not necessarily give better results, but the 4-injectionregimen allows greater freedom, taking into account that the proper insulinadjustment is difficult before adolescence. Successful glycemic control in young patients depends mainly on the quality and intensity of diabetes education. Anydogmatism must be avoided. Due to their pharmakokinetic characteristics,fast-acting and long-acting insulin analogues have specific indications in boththe twice-daily injection regimen and the basal-bolus insulin therapy. Theyimprove quality of life, without necessarily reducing HbA1c. Dietaryrecommendations issued over the last few years are the same for diabetic andnon-diabetic individuals in order to avoid degenerative diseases. In thetwice-daily free-mix regimen, the allocation of carbohydrates throughout the day is essential. There is no linear correlation between the metabolization of xgrams of glucose by y units of insulin and carbohydrate counting is a piece ofnonsense. Glycamic changes during exercise depend largely on blood insulinlevels. In the young diabetic, during insulin deficiency, and therefore in a poordegree of metabolic control, i.e. hyperglycemic and ketotic, exercise accentuateshyperglycemia and ketosis, lea Continue reading >>

Sports Management And Type 1 Diabetes

Sports Management And Type 1 Diabetes

Exercise and increased physical activity is always recommended by doctors for patients with diabetes as a way to help lower their blood glucose levels and provide them with better control. Any everyone knows that exercise and increased activity levels are good for anyone, but it’s particularly important for people with diabetes. Exercise not only is great in helping provide control over blood glucose levels but it is also good for boosting your mood, confidence, your heart health and more. Whether you are participating in a team sport or just increasing your activity levels on your own, proper planning ahead is key to diabetes management, for more information read our article Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes. Blood sugar levels can drop drastically both during and even hours after exercise, so it’s important to be prepared. Preventing Low Blood Sugars Exercise and increased activity such as sports can cause your insulin sensitivity to increase. This results in a higher risk for low blood sugars after each time you exercise. In order to prevent these situations from occurring you will want to ensure the proper planning and steps are in place ahead of time. Here are some tips that can help you to prevent low blood sugars from occurring during and after exercise: Determine your last dosage of insulin before the activity begins. You will want to pay attention to if your activity time will be during the insulin’s peak time. This could put you at a much higher risk for going low. Don’t exercise if you have ketones. When you have ketones and exercise the levels of ketones in your body may actually get much higher and potentially put you into DKA. If you are low before beginning your activity you will want to first, ensure your blood suga Continue reading >>

Nutrition And Insulin Management Guidelines For Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes

Nutrition And Insulin Management Guidelines For Exercise In Type 1 Diabetes

Nutrition and Insulin Management Guidelines for Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition and Insulin Management Guidelines for Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes Patients with type 1 diabetes and their providers should recognize how the form and intensity of exercise affects glucose control, according to a recent consensus statement published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. "Regular exercise has long been known to be beneficial from a cardiometabolic perspective for people living with type 1 diabetes. It has also been known to make glucose control more difficult," Michael C. Riddell, PhD, professor and graduate program director at the School of Kinesiology and Health Science at the Muscle Health Research Centre at York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, told Endocrinology Advisor in an interview. "This recent consensus document highlights the known beneficial effects of regular exercise in type 1 diabetes and how different forms and intensities of exercise impact immediate glucose homeostasis." Dr Riddell and colleagues performed a PubMed search of nutrition and glycemic-based terms for studies involving patients with type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes between January 1990 and July 2016 in which physical activity or exercise was involved. The review of the literature was divided into sections involving management of glycemia, exercise, and nutrition, as well as goals for exercise, contraindications of exercise, and tools for exercise management in patients with type 1 diabetes. "Acute aerobic exercise [typically causes] increases in glucose disposal that cannot be matched by increased hepatic glucose production in type 1 diabetes because circulating insulin levels do not drop rapidly enough at the time of exercise," Dr Riddell told Endocrinology Advisor . Continue reading >>

Combining Sport With Type 1 Diabetes: Elite Athlete Alex Shares His Experiences

Combining Sport With Type 1 Diabetes: Elite Athlete Alex Shares His Experiences

Combining sport with type 1 diabetes: Elite athlete Alex shares his experiences Alex Kozeniauskas is not your average athlete. He has just cycled from Melbourne to the Barossa Valley in five days as part of the Type 1 Challenge to raise awareness and money for type 1 diabetes research, in support of the JDRF One Ride. Alex spoke to myVMC about how he balances the demands of living with a chronic illness with being able to train and compete at the highest level. Alex is one of over 150,000 Australians living with type 1 diabetes.1 It is a chronic condition in which the body is unable to produce the hormone insulin, which lowers blood glucose levels. Insulin is usually produced by beta cells in the pancreas, but in type 1 diabetes these cells are destroyed by the immune system , meaning no insulin is produced. Without insulin, the body cannot process glucose from food into energy for the body, and the glucose levels in the blood can become too high.2 For people with type 1 diabetes, maintaining their blood glucose levels within the optimum range is an intricate task. Insulin injections are required throughout the day to keep blood glucose levels stable.3 Alex described it as a 24/7 management to keep it stable. The more things you do, the more active you are, then the more that has an impact on your blood sugars and insulin level. Physical exercise, insulin dosing and food intake need to be carefully balanced to avoid blood glucose levels becoming too low (hypoglycaemia) or too high (hyperglycaemia).4 Everything that you do has a consequential impact over the following hours. So what you do in the morning impacts what happens at lunch time, then impacts what happens at night, which impacts what happens overnight and then the next morning as well, Alex said. Combining spo Continue reading >>

Sports & Exercise

Sports & Exercise

Whether you’re a Division 1 athlete, play in a club sport, or just like hitting the treadmill at the gym, it’s great that you’re trying to fit exercise into your busy schedule. We know that diabetes adds a whole additional dimension to staying fit, so check out the resources below to supplement what you already know - and learn some things you may not! Maddie, member of the Seattle University Women's Tennis Team, talks about T1D and college sports. Jennifer Smith (T1D since she was a kid!), CDE/RD for Integrated Diabetes Service, answers some common T1D exercise questions. I’m about to exercise, but I just checked my blood sugar and it’s low. What is the best thing to do? Treat the low BG and wait 30 minutes to ensure the low has come up. Take a 15g carb snack if you still plan to work-out once the BG level has returned to normal, and keep a simple carb source with you to treat low during the work-out if necessary. Gatorade or a sweetened sports drink can work very well here. If you plan to workout longer than 45-60 minutes you may need an additional 15g carb snack to ensure BG doesn’t drop again. What about if it’s high? If BG is higher than 250 at the start of a work-out it’s important to test for ketones. If you work-out with moderate to high ketones, BG can climb higher and it can be dangerous. If no ketones are present, then the nature of the exercise will typically drop BG. Do not take a correction bolus of insulin for high BG before a workout – the exercise will enable this insulin to work faster and harder and it’s more likely to have a low BG during or immediately following the workout. What is the perfect blood sugar range to be in before I work out? Optimal BG for performance is between 120-180. BG less than 120 can lead to low BG during t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport

Diabetes And Sport

Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't play sports Having diabetes neednt be a barrier to actively enjoying sports and exercise. Sportsmen and women with diabetes are common and have achieved some of the highest sporting awards available on the planet. Famous UK diabetic sports achievers include Steve Redgrave , who has won numerous at the Olympics including his last gold medal which he won after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Sport, or exercise of some form, is recommended for all people with diabetes because it brings a range of health benefits such as improved sensitivity to insulin, improved. Whether you take part in sport for competitive reasons, or purely for fun, it is a great way to stay healthy. Different sports have different effects on blood sugar Different sports can affect the body in different ways. For example, brisk walking and continuous jogging will usually lead to a reliable lowering in blood glucose levels. By contrast, sprinting and some upper body activities can initially lead to rises in blood sugar levels, which will come down if the exercise session is long enough. By testing your blood glucose levels around exercise, you can learn how different sports and session lengths affect your blood sugar levels. For information on how a range of sports effect blood sugar levels and how you can manage this, see the guides on individual sports in this section. You will need to watch out for hypos (too low blood sugar levels) if you are on any of the following diabetes medications: If you take any of these medications then it is important to take precautions to prevent hypos occurring, this may include taking sufficient carbohydrate before or during exercise or reducing your dose of medication prior to exercise. If you are considering changing your Continue reading >>

Update On Management Of Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes In Athletes

Update On Management Of Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes In Athletes

One of the biggest issues facing athletic individuals with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes is how to maximize performance while minimizing the disruption of optimal blood glucose management. Exercising is often more complicated for those using insulin (all individuals with type 1 and some with type 2 diabetes) due to the potential for muscle contractions to promote blood glucose uptake separately from insulin, leading to hypoglycemia. People with type 2 diabetes who do not require daily insulin administration must still balance many of these factors to perform well during physical endeavors. In fact, a number of elements have to be considered, balanced, and controlled to maintain glycemic balance and optimize exercise performance (see Fig. 1 ). For example, the type, order, timing, and duration of physical activities can impact blood glucose responses, and participation in aerobic, sprint, and resistance training can result in widely varying blood glucose responses ( 62,63 ). Moreover, insulin and food intake must be adjusted to prevent both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in individuals with diabetes both during and after activity. Hydration and electrolyte status, which can be affected by hyperglycemia and medications commonly prescribed for people with diabetes, also can affect performance. All of these issues must be addressed for athletes with any type of diabetes to perform optimally. Maintaining a safe range of blood glucose levels is essential for successful athletic performance for individuals with diabetes. Both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia can impair athletic performance, either directly, or through changes in hydration and electrolyte balance. As such, it is important to understand the various factors that can impact blood glucose levels, in addition to a Continue reading >>

Care Of The Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review

Care Of The Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review

Care of the Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 3Department of Medicine, G.V. Montgomery VA Medical Center, Mississippi, Jackson, United States 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 3Department of Medicine, G.V. Montgomery VA Medical Center, Mississippi, Jackson, United States *Corresponding author: William B. Horton, Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 N State Street, Jackson, Mississippi 39216, United States. Tel: +1-6019845601, Fax: +1-6019846665, E-mail: [email protected] Received 2016 Jan 6; Revised 2016 Feb 24; Accepted 2016 Mar 1. Copyright 2016, Research Institute For Endocrine Sciences and Iran Endocrine Society This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( ) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from a highly specific immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic cells, resulting in chronic hyperglycemia. For many years, one of the mainstays of therapy for patients with T1DM has been exercise balanced with appropriate medications and medical nutrition. Compared to healthy peers, athletes with T1DM experience nearly all the same health-related benefits from exercise. Despite these benefits, effective manag Continue reading >>

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