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Diabetes South Africa Durban

Creating Diabetes Awareness

Creating Diabetes Awareness

NOVEMBER is Diabetes Awareness Month, and Fever reporter Kalisha Naicker chatted to Jenny Russell from Diabetes SA Durban about this silent killer. JR: DSA is a non-profit organisation. We are an organisation that provides wellness education to diabetics and communities. KN: What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? JR: Type 1 is an auto immune condition. Your body attacks the beta cells in your pancreas, and they cannot produce insulin. This usually occurs in children. Type 2 is when the body either cannot produce enough insulin, or it is unable to use it correctly. Unfortunately, it is now becoming more common in young adults and children. The fastest growing group of type 2s is the 35-50 age group, who are breadwinners in a family. JR: You could be very thirsty, go to the toilet often and very tired because the glucose, which is your energy source, remains in your bloodstream. In addition one could lose weight very quickly without dieting, be very hungry all the time, put on weight, have blurred vision, dry itchy skin, sores that dont heal and recurrent fungal infections like thrush. KN: What other problems or illnesses should one look out for when diagnosed diabetic? JR: Top of the list is cardiovascular disease. Others are stroke, eye disease, kidney disease, nerve damage, lower limb amputations, sexual dysfunction, high blood pressure and cholesterol. KN: What must one do if they suspect they are diabetic? JR: A simple finger-prick at a pharmacy and hours after eating your blood glucose level shouldnt be above eight. KN: Do you offer counselling or assistance to those diagnosed? JR: Yes, we offer free lifestyle education. We also have a database of doctors, diabetes nurse specialists, podiatrists, dietitians, biokineticists, etc, who can help wit Continue reading >>

Diabetes South Africa

Diabetes South Africa

DIABETES SOUTH AFRICA Promoting diabetes care and support for all Diabetes South Africa is a non-profit organization, founded in 1969 to be a support and an advocate for all people with diabetes in South Africa. Empowering all those affected by Diabetes through support,education and information. Providing awareness to all and highlighting risk factors associated with diabetes and promoting healthy lifestyles. Diabetes SA has a National Office in cape Townand 7branches around the country. Branches are run primarily by volunteers drawn from the ranks of the membership base. Our branches have a strong network through linkages with over 100 smaller local branches and diabetes wellnessgroups in South Africa. Informing, educatingand supporting all people who have diabetes and their families. Acting as an advocate for people with diabetes, lobbying for better facilities, cheaper medication and better services. Promoting prevention through public awareness of diabetes, its symptoms and risks. Diabetes SA is a member of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), which represents 146 diabetes organisations in 121 countries. Diabetes SA representatives are intimately involved in a number of working committees on this prestigious body. Diabetes SA has working relationships with SEMDSA (Society for Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa for doctors specializing in diabetes DESSA (Diabetes Education Society of South Africa) for specialist health care workers CDE (Centres for Diabetes and Endocrinology) An association of private medical practitioners and other diabetes related healthcare workers Non-government organizations working in related fields within the primary health care sector. Industry, including pharmaceutical companies and other companies servicing peop Continue reading >>

Diabetes, A Silent Killer

Diabetes, A Silent Killer

EVERY eight seconds a person dies of diabetes worldwide and in South Africa approximately 1 in 5 people over the age of 35 has type 2 diabetes. In KwaZulu-Natal alone 1.2 million people have diabetes and more than 50% cases still remain undiagnosed. These daunting statistics were revealed by Diabetes South Africa organisation at the recent Diabetes Run/Walk launch in Suncoast Towers Hotel. Jenny Russell, the Branch Manager at Diabetes SA in Durban says, The number of people that die from Diabetes complications is twice as much as that of HIV/AIDS or cancer, we are losing the battle against this cruel and deadly disease in every community. It is hoped that campaigns like the Global Diabetes Walk will continue to raise awareness on Diabetes, the Health Tsunami of the 21st century, and move people towards living more active and healthy lifestyles. Russell said after a successful first event with over 1000 people entering last year, the Durban Global Diabetes 5km Walk supported by Pronutro and Lotus FM will once again take place along Durbans Golden Mile on Sunday, October 28th and this year they are expecting over 3000 people to walk the 5km route where there will be a festive health expo and members of the public will receive free glucose and blood pressure tests, among others. Popular radio personality from Gagasi FM, Kini Shandu said he first discovered that he is diabetes in year 2010 but he ensured everyone that the disease is manageable. Diabetes is a silent killer after learning that I was diabetes I encouraged my family and friends to go and get tested. I will be taking part in the walk for the first time. South Africa needs an initiative like this to raise awareness. Diabetes has been dubbed the silent killer for years, with good reason, and its time we do someth Continue reading >>

Diabetes Still A Major Cause Of Death In Sa

Diabetes Still A Major Cause Of Death In Sa

JOHANNESBURG - In 2012 at least 58 people died every day from Diabetes in South Africa. This is according to Statistics South Africa. The 2012 Mortality and causes of death report released in September this year shows that Diabetes mellitus is the fifth highest cause of natural deaths in South Africa. It was the number one cause of natural deaths in the Western Cape. A report by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) shows that almost half of all people with Diabetes live in just three countries, China, India and the USA. South Africa does not even feature in the list of top ten countries for Diabetes prevalence yet the rate of people dying because of the illness on the continent is far higher than in the countries with higher prevalance. Diabetes South Africa’s Keegan Hall says South Africa's high death rate is because of lack of access to insulin and to medical professionals who have specialised in treating Diabetes. “Insulin has been around since the 1920s yet people are still dying from Diabetes….why is this?” he said. “This is purely an access and education problem, our poor health infrastructure is killing people,” said Hall. The Department of Health however says the high numbers of people are because of poor lifestyle habits. “Numbers would come right down if people practiced healthy lifestyles,” said Popo Maja, head of communications in a statement issued to eNCA. “The country as a whole needs to do far better. This requires more efforts from all sectors such as NGOs, industry as well as a number of government departments,” said the department. More awareness is needed as it is estimated that about 50 percent of people living with Diabetes are unaware they have the illness said Hall. The Department of Health agreed with this view, “It Continue reading >>

Diabetes South Africa - Durban - About | Facebook

Diabetes South Africa - Durban - About | Facebook

Sexual dysfunction. . . THE LIST GOES ON. . . See More When you have diabetes, your body either cannot make its own insulin or cannot use insulin properly. ... Your blood glucose levels will be high, and you will need treatment. Diabetes can be managed with medication, a healthy eating plan and exercise. The good news is that having diabetes need not mean the end of a normal healthy life if you first accept that you have the condition and the learn how to manage it. Occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. It is usually starts in young people under the age of 30, and may occur in very young children and infants. The onset is sudden and dramatic. People who have type 1 diabetes must inject insulin everyday to survive. Insulin dosages are carefully balanced with food intake and exercise programmes Occurs when the insulin which the pancreas produces is either not enough or does not work properly. Approximately 85% - 90% of all people with diabetes are type 2, and many people who have this condition are undiagnosed. Most people with type 2 are over 40. They are usually overweight and do not exercise. Exercise and healthy eating plans are essential for good management, but usually tablets will be prescribed to improve control. Many people with type 2 eventually use insulin as they get older. You may be very thirsty and go to the toilet often. Your body cant use energy it needs from your food. You may lose weight quickly without dieting. High blood sugar could cause blurred vision. You may have dry, itchy skin and sores may not heal easily. Each branch is autonomous and has to fund itself. We receive NO funding from Govt. NOT ONE CENT!! As we do not receive funding from Govt, it is only by receiving donations from generous folk and businesses. We have an enormous ch Continue reading >>

Step Up For Diabetes At The Durban Wellness Festival This November

Step Up For Diabetes At The Durban Wellness Festival This November

Step up for diabetes at the Durban Wellness Festival this November Shockingly worldwide, 415 million people were diagnosed as diabetic as opposed to 35 million patients with HIV and 14 million with cancer. Involved in the event (from left) Lloyd Paul, Jenny Russell, Holly Wasserfall DIABETES may be the second highest cause of death in South Africa after tuberculosis but people are still in denial. As most people only begin to look after their health when they have a scare and are forced to drastically stem their intake of fast food and begin exercising, theDurban Wellness Festival supported by SASA and Lillyhas been created to show people that they can make positive, fun changes before it is too late. YOU MAY BE INTERESTED: Children with diabetes pose a special emotional challenge for parents and caregivers The strong message from Jenny Russell, branch manager for Diabetes SA Durban, a non-profit organisation that provides support and wellness education for both diabetics and communities at large, is that diabetes is both preventable and manageable. Get tested at the Durban Wellness Festival so you can manage this silent killer or, better still, learn how to live a healthy life the fun way, she suggested. The Durban Wellness Festival takes place on Saturday, November 11, 2017. Taking place at the Durban Amphitheatre at the Bay of Plenty, the Durban Wellness Festival will open for registration at 10am. Join us for either a 5km run or walk, a variety of entertaining activities, and a live performance by Durban singer and songwriter, Holly Wasserfall who also happens to be a type 1 diabetic. This is a family affair, so everyone is welcome even your pet dog. But on a leash, of course, said Russell. The Durban Wellness Festival officially kicks off at 2pm with the 5km walk Continue reading >>

Diabetes South Africa

Diabetes South Africa

A Non-profit Organisation is a trust, company or other association of persons: (a) that was established for a public purpose, and (b) the income and property of this organisation are not distributable to its members or office bearers except as reasonable compensation for services rendered. Which organisations can apply for NPO status? Any organisation that is not working for profit and is not part of government can apply for registration. These are mostly the following: - Trusts that have registered with Master of the Supreme Court under the Trust Property Control Act 57 of 1988. - Organisations that have registered as Section 21 Companies under the Company Act 61 of 1973. - Any other voluntary association that is not-for-profit. I want to register my organisation as a NPO. How do I go about this? You need to complete an application form with the Department of Social Development. For more details go to I want to start my own non-profit organisation. Where do I start? You need to complete an application form with the Department of Social Development. For more details go to Continue reading >>

The Burden Of Diabetes Mellitus In Kwazulu-natal's Public Sector: A 5-year Perspective

The Burden Of Diabetes Mellitus In Kwazulu-natal's Public Sector: A 5-year Perspective

BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM), together with its devastating complications, has a huge impact on both the patients it affects and the global economy as a whole. The economies of developing countries are already under threat from communicable diseases. More needs to be done to stem the tide of non-communicable diseases like DM. In order for us to develop new strategies to tackle this dread disease we need to obtain and analyse as many data as possible from the geographical area where we work OBJECTIVE: To describe the burden of DM in the public sector of the province of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa (SA METHOD: Data on the number of diabetes visits, DM patients that were initiated on treatment, defaulters and DM-related amputations were accessed from the Department of Health records for the period 2010 - 2014 inclusive RESULTS: There was a decline in the number of patients initiated on treatment per 100 000 population from 2010 to 2014 inclusive (265.9 v. 197.5 v. 200.7 v. 133.4 v. 148.7). Defaulter rates for 2013 compared with 2014 were 3.31% v. 1.75%, respectively and amputation rates were 0.09% v. 0.05% for 2013 and 2014, respectively. There was a strong proportional relationship observed between the number of defaulters and number of diabetes-related amputations (r=0.801; p=0.000) (Pearson correlation). A notable percentage of DM patients ranging between 63% and 80% were commenced on pharmacological therapy at their local clinics rather than at hospitals in the province CONCLUSION: Strategies directed towards detection and treatment of DM, together with decreasing defaulter rates and thereby decreasing diabetes-related amputations, need to be addressed urgently. The majority of patients were initiated on therapy at the clinic level. This emphasises the need Continue reading >>

Some Of South Africa's Top Diabetes Experts: Sweet Life Panel Of Experts

Some Of South Africa's Top Diabetes Experts: Sweet Life Panel Of Experts

Sweet Life is an inspiring diabetes community. Sweet Life is an online diabetes community that informs, inspires and connects people with diabetes in South Africa. We are here to offer reliable advice on all you need to know about diabetes, support people with diabetes and share that just because you have diabetes, doesnt mean you cant live a happy, healthy life. We do this with the help of some of South Africas top diabetes experts. Our Core Team is supported by a Panel of Experts who ensure everything we write is medically and factually accurate. Meet the fabulous team behind Sweet Life: The Editor of Sweet Life and a Type 1 diabetic. She is also a journalist and author, and published her first novel the same year she was diagnosed. Bridget is passionate about showing the positive side of the condition and proving that diabetes doesnt have to stop you living a healthy, happy life. The Creative Director of Sweet Life. He is also a professional photographer (take a look at his portfolio on www.markpeddle.com ) and has many years experience as both a graphic designer and art director. Both his brother and his wife are diabetic, so he has a deep understanding of the condition. The Publisher of Sweet Life. With years of industry experience and a Masters degree in Media, Claire takes care of Sweet Lifes production, publishing and distribution every quarter. Her husband and son make her life sweet. Specializes in Advertising Sales across a range of print and online media and has run her own Media Marketing and Sales company for the past 24 years. She has particularly strong relationships with the FMCG, pharmaceutical, health and beauty industries and her clients are amongst SAs major retailers. Diabetes isnt just a medical condition. Our team includes top diabetes experts f Continue reading >>

Burden Of Diabetes And First Evidence For The Utility Of Hba1c For Diagnosis And Detection Of Diabetes In Urban Black South Africans: The Durban Diabetes Study

Burden Of Diabetes And First Evidence For The Utility Of Hba1c For Diagnosis And Detection Of Diabetes In Urban Black South Africans: The Durban Diabetes Study

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Burden of Diabetes and First Evidence for the Utility of HbA1c for Diagnosis and Detection of Diabetes in Urban Black South Africans: The Durban Diabetes Study Affiliations Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom Affiliation Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa Affiliation Centre for Evidence-Based Health Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa Affiliation Research and Policy Department, Office of Strategy Management, eThekwini Municipality, Durban, South Africa Affiliation Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, United Kingdom Affiliations Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom * E-mail: [email protected] (MSS); [email protected] (AAM) Affiliations Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom Continue reading >>

Mercury - Diabetes Soars In Sa Indians

Mercury - Diabetes Soars In Sa Indians

GENETICS, DIET, INACTIVITY TO BLAME LIFESTYLE illnesses like diabetes often exist in the shadows of better-known conditions like HIV and Aids. This was why it was important to use a vehicle such as World Health Day - being observed today - to bring these conditions back into the spotlight, say activists. Lauren Gillis, founder of Relate Bracelets - a non-profit organisation that raises funds for more than 80 causes, including health-related issues, through the sale of hand-made bracelets - said there were "huge gaps" in fund-raising and representation when it came to lifestyle conditions. "Even global funding for HIV has decreased. This gives you a sense of the impact on things like diabetes." She said raising funds for health-care awareness and non-profits was a "fiercely active arena". "There are numerous, equally deserving causes all vying for the attention of the public, be it for diabetes, breast cancer or HIV/Aids." Durban, with its high population of Indians, is particularly affected by the lifestyle disease. Research has shown that members of the Indian diaspora all over the world are genetically predisposed to diabetes. These were the findings of a 2005 research paper published in the British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease and conducted by Yackoob Kassim Seedat at the University of KwaZuluNatal. "There (has been) a dramatic increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in South African Indians and this is observed in many parts of the Indian diaspora, which includes the UK, Mauritius and Fiji. Recent data have shown the prevalence of diabetes." He said dietary factors and physical inactivity could contribute to diabetes mellitus. "In a community study to determine the prevalence and known risk factors ... of 778 subjects, aged 15 to 69 years, in the me Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Ophthalmic Surgeons - Laser Eye Surgery Durban - South Africa

Diabetes | Ophthalmic Surgeons - Laser Eye Surgery Durban - South Africa

Ophthalmic Surgeons - Diabetes - Durban - South Africa Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic problem in which the blood sugar is abnormally elevated. It results in progressive damage to the inner lining of the blood vessels throughout the body. Diabetic retinal damage is the 3rd most common cause of blindness worldwide. Diabetes causes multiple eye problems. Cataract formation and retinal disease are the most significant and are the focus of treatment for most patients with eye problems. Diabetic patients are also more prone to eye infections, blocked blood vessels on the retina and high pressure in the eyes amongst other things. Blood vessel problems are the hallmark of diabetes. The retinal blood vessels are particularly sensitive to abnormal blood sugar levels over a long period. The vessels leak and bleed on the retina and in the worst instances this results retinal detachment and blindness. When the blood vessels become involved we refer to the problem as diabetic retinopathy and this retinopathy ranges from mild in the early stages to very severe and sight threatening later on. In proliferative retinopathy abnormal blood vessels grow on the retina. These vessels leak and bleed and can cause blindness. All diabetics should have routine eye screening, in particular for retinopathy and cataracts. The longer one has diabetes the more likely there will be eye involvement. In the early stages of eye disease there may be no symptoms and therefore routine screening is essential to identify problems before they become serious and irreversible. The most important measures for eye health in diabetes is immaculate control of the blood sugar and blood pressure. Patients with excellent metabolic control tend to respond well to treatment while those with poor control often ge Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education Society Of South Africa

Diabetes Education Society Of South Africa

Diabetes Education Society of South Africa The primary goal of diabetes management is to improve and maintain the quality of life for the person with diabetes. People who have diabetes are a heterogeneous group, whose ability to engage in life long self-care is affected by age, gender, culture, psychosocial status, literacy level, style of learning, physical condition and the treatment. Successful management of diabetes can be achieved through the individualised adjustment of diet, exercise and medication. Successful self-care can be attained through patient participation in individualized education programmes, using a multidisciplinary team approach wherein the person with diabetes holds the central position. The goal of self-care can be accomplished by improving the necessary patient knowledge and skills, and by facilitating changes in attitudes, values and beliefs. Just as people with diabetes change with time and experience, so does diabetes care change and improve. Regular assessment and adjustment of the education plan will be needed to encourage patients to achieve and maintain optimum quality of life. Diabetes Education is vital to the management of diabetes. It is integral to effective self-care, and has been shown to be effective in decreasing the complications in both the short and long term. Diabetes Education is preventative in nature and associated with significant cost benefit when delivered in an effective manner. To achieve its objectives and fulfil its role as advisory body the Diabetes Education Society of South Africa acts within its Mission Statement. DESSA holds as its intended purpose: the welfare of the person with Diabetes Mellitus, and the provision of comprehensive education, likely to promote effective self health care, delivered in a manner Continue reading >>

Distribution, Incidence, Prevalence And Default Of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Accessing Public Healthcare In The 11 Districts Of Kwazulu-natal, South Africa | Sahadew | South African Medical Journal

Distribution, Incidence, Prevalence And Default Of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Accessing Public Healthcare In The 11 Districts Of Kwazulu-natal, South Africa | Sahadew | South African Medical Journal

Distribution, incidence, prevalence and default of patients with diabetes mellitus accessing public healthcare in the 11 districts of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa Nikita Sahadew, Veena S Singaram, Susan Brown Background. The global increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is most marked in African countries. The District Health Information System (DHIS) is the primary data collection system of the Department of Health in KwaZulu-Natal Province (KZN), South Africa. Data are routinely collected at all public healthcare facilities in the province and are aggregated per facility. Objective. To investigate the distribution, incidence and prevalence of diabetes in the public healthcare sector of KZN. Methods. Data collected by the DHIS for all patients with diabetes in KZN from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014 inclusive were analysed. Additional open-source databases were accessed to enable further exploration of the data collected. Results. The study showed that the majority (38.7%) of patients with diabetes on the public sector register were from the district of eThekwini. Positive correlations were found between the prevalence of diabetes, the mortality rate and the number of defaulters (patients with diabetes who did not return for regular treatment). Conclusions. Provincial estimates of the prevalence of diabetes in this study were higher than the known national prevalence. This may be due to the large proportion of Indians in KZN, who have a genetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus. However, allowance must be made for possible inaccurate data collection at source with miscounting of individuals. This study supports the global trend of an association between diabetes and urbanisation and highlights the need for regular diabetes screening and education, partic Continue reading >>

South African Doctors Hospitals Medical - Patient Support Associations - The South African Diabetes Association Sada

South African Doctors Hospitals Medical - Patient Support Associations - The South African Diabetes Association Sada

State and provincial health departments SEMDSA (Society for Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa - for doctors specializing in diabetes DESSA (Diabetes Education Society of South Africa) for specialist health care workers CDE (Centres for Diabetes and Endocrinology) An association of private medical practitioners and other diabetes related healthcare workers Non-government organizations working in related fields within the primary health care sector. Industry, including pharmaceutical companies and other companies servicing people with diabetes. Diabetes SA is primarily a volunteer organisation and relies heavily on people with diabetes and their families who pool their talents, share their knowledge and experiences and give of their time to help each other. You too could be a great organizer and get everyone off on a big walk or you may, equally valuable, be a friendly face at the end of a hospital bed. Call your nearest Diabetes SA branch and see where you may be able to assist others with diabetes Diabetes is any of several disorders characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood and increased urine production. Diabetes insipidus is a disorder characterized by increased urine production caused by inadequate secretion of vasopressin by the pituitary gland. Diabetes mellitus is either of two chronic forms of diabetes in which insulin does not effectively transport glucose from the bloodstream: juvenile-onset diabetes is a rapidly developing form, affecting children and young adults, in which the body does not produce enough insulin and insulin must therefore be injected or adult-onset diabetes a slowly developing form in which the body's tissues become unable to use insulin effectively. If there are any errors in the above information, please n Continue reading >>

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