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Diabetes Smoking And Drinking

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

Alcohol Consumption And The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes

Alcohol Consumption And The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes

A 20-year follow-up of the Finnish Twin Cohort Study Abstract OBJECTIVE—The aim of this study was to investigate alcohol consumption in relation to the incidence of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The study population consisted of 22,778 twins of the Finnish Twin Cohort. This cohort was compiled in 1975 and includes all same-sexed twins born in Finland before 1958. Information on alcohol, smoking, diet, physical activity, medical, and social conditions was obtained by questionnaires administered in 1975, 1981, and 1990. By record linkage to national registers of hospital discharge and prescribed medication, 580 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were identified during 20 years of follow-up. RESULTS—Moderate alcohol consumption (5–29.9 g/day in men and 5–19.9 g/day in women) tended to be associated with a reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes compared with low consumption (<5 g/day). The estimates were lower in overweight (BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2) subjects (relative risk 0.7, 95% CI 0.5–1.0 [men]; 0.6, 0.3–1.1 [women]). High alcohol consumption (≥20 g/day) was associated with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in lean women (2.9, 1.1–7.5) but not in overweight women or in men. In women, binge drinking was associated with an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (2.1, 1.0–4.4). Analyses of alcohol-discordant twin pairs supported a reduced risk in moderate consuming twins compared with their low-consuming cotwins (odds ratio 0.5, 95% CI 0.2–1.5). CONCLUSIONS—The results of this study suggested that moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, binge drinking and high alcohol consumption may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in women. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the Continue reading >>

Physical Activity, Smoking, And Alcohol Consumption In Association With Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Middle-aged And Elderly Chinese Men

Physical Activity, Smoking, And Alcohol Consumption In Association With Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Middle-aged And Elderly Chinese Men

Physical Activity, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption in Association with Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes among Middle-Aged and Elderly Chinese Men Liang Shi , Xiao-Ou Shu , Honglan Li , Hui Cai , Qiaolan Liu , Wei Zheng , Yong-Bing Xiang , Raquel Villegas Affiliations: Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America, Department of Diabetes Control and Prevention, Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, Peoples Republic of China Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, Peoples Republic of China Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America Affiliations: Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America, Huaxi School of Public Health, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Peoples Republic of China Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, Peoples Republic of China Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Tennessee, United States of Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking And Diabetes

What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Most of the food a person eats is turned into glucose (a kind of sugar) for the body’s cells to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use the insulin very well. Less glucose gets into the cells and instead builds up in the blood.1 There are different types of diabetes. Type 2 is the most common in adults and accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases. Fewer people have type 1 diabetes, which most often develops in children, adolescents, or young adults.2 How Is Smoking Related to Diabetes? We now know that smoking causes type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers. And people with diabetes who smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to have trouble with insulin dosing and with controlling their disease.3 The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher your risk for type 2 diabetes.3 No matter what type of diabetes you have, smoking makes your diabetes harder to control. If you have diabetes and you smoke, you are more likely to have serious health problems from diabetes. Smokers with diabetes have higher risks for serious complications, including:4 Heart and kidney disease Poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and possible amputation (removal of a body part by surgery, such as toes or feet) Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness) Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that causes numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination) If you are a smoker with diabetes, quitting Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Drinking And Smoking: A Dangerous Combination

Diabetes, Drinking And Smoking: A Dangerous Combination

In the Spotlight A healthy lifestyle can help control diabetes. For instance, regular physical activity and a good diet play a big role in managing the disease. But unhealthy habits, such as smoking and drinking too much alcohol, can make diabetes and its complications worse. Why? Let's take smoking first. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), people with diabetes who smoke are three times more likely to die of heart disease than those with diabetes who are nonsmokers. Both diabetes and smoking increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Smoking also increases the risk for all diabetes-related health problems, such as kidney disease, nerve damage and leg and foot infections. According to research published in 2007 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, smoking also may increase the risk for developing diabetes if you don't already have it. Diabetes and smoking are particularly relevant in the Veteran community. Nearly 25 percent of Veterans who receive health care through VA have diabetes and almost 20 percent smoke. Quit Smoking The best thing to do for your health, whether or not you have diabetes, is to quit smoking as soon as you can. Research shows most smokers want to quit. According to VA, 57 percent of Veterans who are current smokers reported that they tried to quit within the last year. The addictive nature of nicotine can make quitting a major challenge. If you want to quit, talk to your health care team. You can work with a health behavior coordinator or join a class with other Veterans who are trying to quit. VA also offers smoking cessation medicines. "If you are having trouble quitting, at least cut back," advised Dr. Sharon Watts, a Nurse Practitioner and Certified Diabetes Educator for VA. "Cutting back is better than noth Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Alcohol And Smoking: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes, Alcohol And Smoking: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes, Alcohol and Smoking: Is there a connection? Diabetes mellitus is characterized by high glucose levels in blood stream because of defects in the bodys ability to either produce or use insulin for regulation of glucose. If you suffer from any type of diabetes, then it means there is an excess amount of sugar in your blood stream. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. There are three types of diabetes type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually starts in childhood, type 2 diabetes is usually found in adults and gestational diabetes is found in pregnant women. Assuming that children and pregnant women do not drink or smoke and hence do not get affected by its complications, the scope of this article is limited to type 2 diabetes. Various researches have proved that alcohol and tobacco consumption increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. The general opinion is that drinking alcohol is good for health. To some extent, this belief is true also but not entirely. Actually drinking moderate amounts of alcohol, one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men, has been proven to be good for health but any amount more than that can actually reverse the health benefits. When a person drinks alcohol in excess amounts, then it affects various body parts adversely. Excess alcohol consumption can cause inflammation of the pancreas, which can affect its ability to secrete insulin and can cause further problems in diabetics. Alcohol consumption affects your liver also. When you drink alcohol, your liver deviates from its primary function of producing glucose. Excess intake of alcohol can actually decrease your blood sugar levels, which is sometimes dangerous to life; you can even experience hypoglycemia. If you want to drink alcohol Continue reading >>

Effect Of Alcohol, Cigarette Smoking, And Diabetes On Occurrence Of Hepatocellular Carcinoma In Patients With Transfusion-acquired Hepatitis C Virus Infection Who Develop Cirrhosis.

Effect Of Alcohol, Cigarette Smoking, And Diabetes On Occurrence Of Hepatocellular Carcinoma In Patients With Transfusion-acquired Hepatitis C Virus Infection Who Develop Cirrhosis.

Division of Hepatology, Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli, Italy. [email protected] Alcohol drinking, cigarette smoking, and diabetes have been claimed as risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in case-control studies. The aim of this study was to define the impact of these risk factors on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C virus-related liver cirrhosis. A historical cohort of 138 patients with posttransfusion hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis was selected by reviewing all files of patients referred to our liver unit. Sixty-three of them (46%) developed hepatocellular carcinoma. At univariate analysis, risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma were observed in patients aged above 59 years [P=0.004; relative risk (RR): 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19-3.68], male sex (P<0.001; RR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.59-3.87), habit of alcohol drinking (P=0.001; RR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.24-2.88), and duration of alcohol consumption of more than 30 years (P=0.02; RR: 2.08, 95% CI: 0.98-4.40). At Cox regression analysis, only male sex was an independent predictive factor (beta=0.86; P=0.002; hazard ratio=2.4, 95% CI: 1.3-4.1). Diabetes, smoking, and alcohol drinking were not independently related to the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis. Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol And Type 2 Diabetes (adult Onset Diabetes)

Drinking Alcohol And Type 2 Diabetes (adult Onset Diabetes)

I. About Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a very serious disease. It’s especially harmful to the kidneys, nerves, and eyes. It can lead to problems such as blindness, impotence, loss of limbs, and death. The disease also increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. The subject of drinking alcohol and type 2 diabetes is important to many diabetics. Overview I. About Type 2 Diabetes II. Research Summaries III. Form of Alcohol IV. Summary About six percent of the U.S. population suffers from the disease. Tens of millions of people around the globe have diabetes. Many more are at risk. Symptoms The American Diabetes Association reports that common symptoms of diabetes include these. • Frequent urination. • Fatigue • Strong hunger, athough eating enough. • Blurry vision. • Strong thirst. • Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal. • Tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands or feet. Some people have symptoms that are so mild that they go unnoticed. If in doubt, see a doctor. Fortunately, the moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages reduces the risk of developing diabetes. The alcohol can be in the form of beer, wine, liquor or distilled spirits. Spirits include whiskey, tequila, rum, vodka, gin, etc. II. Research Summaries Moderate drinking is beneficial for type 2 diabetes. The evidence is overwhelming. A. Reviews of Research Of 26 Studies •This meta-analysis examined the dose-response relationship. That is, the relationship between amount of alcohol consumed and the degree of risk reduction. The authors analyzed the 26 prospective cohort studies that had the necessary data. Included were 706,716 persons (275,711 men and 431,005 women). There were 31,621 cases of diabetes. Compared to non-drinkers, those who had an average of about one drink per day ha Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Smoking

Diabetes And Smoking

Tweet The information that smoking is bad for us is everywhere, but for diabetics, smoking can be even more damaging. Beyond the usual reasons, why shouldn’t I smoke if I have diabetes? Smoking is now proven to be an independent risk factor for diabetes, and amongst diabetics it increases the risk of complications. Diabetes complications already include heart disease, stroke and circulation problems. Smoking adds to the risk of developing all of these things. In some cases, smoking can double the likelihood of these conditions, as well as doubling the chances of suffering from kidney problems and erectile dysfunction. For type 2 diabetics, the major cause of death is cardiovascular disease. How does smoking increase my heart disease risk as a diabetic? Smoking and diabetes both increase the risk of heart disease in very similar ways, and so when combined, they greatly exacerbate the chances of suffering a heart related condition such as a heart attack or stroke. Both high levels of glucose in the blood and smoking damage the walls of the arteries in such a way that fatty deposits can build up much easier. As this occurs, the blood vessels narrow and make circulating blood much harder. When this happens to the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply the heart muscle with blood and therefore oxygen) a heart attack can occur. Similarly, a stroke is when not enough blood can get to the brain, and so anything that may limit blood flow increases the risks of a stroke. High blood glucose levels also have this effect on the blood vessels and blood flow, so if you smoke when you have diabetes, you are putting yourself at a much greater risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. I am not diabetic, but I am a smoker. Could smoking lead me to develop diabetes? Smoking is als Continue reading >>

Drinking, Smoking & Drug Use

Drinking, Smoking & Drug Use

Part of becoming an adult means making responsible decisions. It is a known fact that some people (with our without diabetes) choose to drink alcohol and/or do drugs. While we are certainly not encouraging the use of alcohol or drugs, it is important for a person with diabetes to be well educated on how alcohol and drugs can impact blood sugar and diabetes management so that smart and safe choices are made. What You Need to Know About Drinking Alcohol Alcohol is a "Legal Depressant" and causes the following: Significant increase in risk of hypoglycemia (your liver is busy processing alcohol and is not as good at putting out stored sugar when you blood sugar starts to drop) Impaired judgment and unable to make good decisions (short-term) Impaired coordination and reaction time (short term) Chronic liver disease, liver failure (long term) Increased risk for heart disease and stroke (long term) Increased risk of some cancers (long term) Overall it is SAFEST not to drink; however if you do drink know this: Ensure that friends are aware of both drinking and diabetes Consume bedtime snack (do not bolus) or put on a temp rate (for pumpers) What You Need to Know about Tobacco & Nicotine Damages small blood vessels and can lead to kidney and nerve disease. People with diabetes are already at risk for this damage and therefore your risk is MUCH higher if you have diabetes and smoke cigarettes. Can increase your blood sugars and make diabetes more difficult to manage. Can increase your risk for heart attacks and strokes. What to Do if you have Diabetes and use Tobacco or Other Nicotine Products Stop if already started- It is NEVER too late to quit! Patches and gum (Nicotine Replacement Therapy) Other Illegal Drugs and Abuse of Prescription Drugs: All can impact diabetes and impai Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Smoking Or Drinking?

Smoking Or Drinking?

Member T2 since 2005, on byetta and metformin This is a general question that I'm putting out for everyone to see what you think. If a diabetic is both a smoker and a drinker which should they try to give up first? Consider the effects on the diabetes. It would probably not be fair to ask them to give up both at once and deal with the diabetic issues all at the same time. I'm just curious. D.D. Family Adult-onset Type 1 since 11/2008 There's no reason to give up drinking altogether just because of diabetes, assuming the person in question is a moderate drinker and not an alcoholic. Of course, if weight is an issue, giving up drinking will reduce calories and help in that way. But drinking moderately is possible for many diabetics. Smoking, on the other hand, is never good, and is even worse for diabetics as it can reduce blood flow, increase blood pressure, and all sorts of other bad things. So I'd say give up smoking asap. Social drinking 1 x per month (or so) is no big deal. Smoking at any time interval is "very bad". Especially for a "D" person. Think missing feet, think missing legs. Good enough reason to quit smoking now??? It should be. If wondering, I used to smoke. Did it for 32 years Then, I woke up one morning and said "STOP". Been smoke free for the last approx 2.5 years. If I can quit smoking, anybody can. One just have to put their mind to it... If wondering.... I have been quit for 2Y 3M 4W 1D 3h 15m (850 days). I have saved $9,351.48 by not smoking 17,002 cigattes. I have saved 1M 4W 50m of my life. My Quit Date: 12/4/2006 10:50 AM. And, money saved allow me to buy nice yearly gifts for my wife and help pay for my kids future education. Definate other great reasons to quit smoking as well. The reason I posted this is because my Diabetic Educator told me Continue reading >>

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Smoking is a health hazard for anyone, but for people with diabetes or a high risk of developing the disease, lighting up can contribute to serious health complications. Researchers have long known that diabetes patients who smoke have higher blood sugar levels, making their disease more difficult to control and putting them at greater danger of developing complications such as blindness, nerve damage, kidney failure and heart problems. Now a new study offers the most definitive evidence why: the nicotine in cigarettes. Xiao-Chuan Liu, a professor of chemistry at the California State Polytechnic University, presented results from his study of blood samples from smokers at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition. He found that nicotine, when added to human blood samples, raised levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by as much as 34%. Liu expects a similar effect occurs with diabetic smokers, whom he hopes to test in a follow up study. Hemoglobin A1c — a combination of hemoglobin (which ferries oxygen) and glucose — is a standard indicator of blood sugar content in the body. Doctors always knew smoking can make diabetes worse, but, Liu says, “now we know why. It’s the nicotine. This study also implies that if you are a smoker, and not diabetic, that your chances of developing diabetes is higher.” The higher A1c levels rise in the blood, he says, the more likely it is that other protein complexes, which build up in various tissues of the body, from the eyes, heart and blood vessels, can form, leading to blockages in circulation and other complications. But perhaps more importantly, the results also suggest that nicotine replacement products such as patches and nicotine-containing electronic cigarettes, aren’t a safe option for diabetes patients Continue reading >>

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