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Diabetes Shingles

Is There Link Between Shingles & Diabetes

Is There Link Between Shingles & Diabetes

Is there link between Shingles & Diabetes Shingles is a nerve infection caused by the virus called Varicella-zoster and it is the same virus that causes chickenpox. When a person has chickenpox and it gets healed the virus does not go out of the body completely, instead it stays in a dormant and hibernating manner in the nerve roots. In one out of five persons this virus may become active once again many years later to cause shingles. It is a nasty, painful and itchy disease with blisters and it mostly affects the older adults above 50 years. Shingles can affect a person of any age, but the trend and studies have shown that persons with lowered body immunity have greater chances of having it. Body immunity may be low due to many reasons like old age, AIDS, cancer treatment, organ transplant, steroid treatment or extreme stress. Apart from these reasons it has been noticed that diabetes is just one disease which causes shingles to become active in the nerve cells and trigger the hibernating virus. Many cases have been seen in which the persons did not know they had diabetes and had shingles. When they were tested it was found that they had diabetes. There is no direct link between the factors of having diabetes and getting shingles, but having diabetes is a trigger for the hibernating shingles virus. Diabetes is an auto-immune disease and people with auto-immune disease are prone to get shingles. AIDS, Rheumatoid arthritis, Kidney disease which require dialysis are also some diseases which trigger the dormant herpes-zoster virus. No one can catch shingles. If a person comes in contact with the blisters of an active shingles patient he will get chickenpox if he did not get it before. Shingles can outbreak from within the body only as the virus is there in the nerve roots Continue reading >>

Should You Get The Shingles Vaccine? - University Of South Alabama Physicians Group, Mobile & Gulf Coast, Alabama (al)

Should You Get The Shingles Vaccine? - University Of South Alabama Physicians Group, Mobile & Gulf Coast, Alabama (al)

A Novel Treatment for Uncontrolled Seizures In 2006, the Food and Drug Administration approved Zostavax, a vaccine for adults that is used as a prevention strategy against shingles. Julie Lucas, a physician assistant at the University of South Alabama Knollwood Physicians Group, said shingles is very common and can be prevented. She recommends the shingles vaccine to adults over the age of 60. The vaccine works, and I've seen many unnecessary cases of shingles that are very painful and debilitating, she said. Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection that causes a painful, blistering skin rash. In some cases it can cause blindness if the virus occurs in the eye or deafness if it arises in the ear, Lucas said. It can also cause post-herpetic neuralgia, which is severe pain lasting months within the rash site. According to Lucas, shingles is a re-activation of the old chicken pox virus that stays in the body locked away in the nerve roots by the immune system. Sometimes as we age or if our immune system gets distracted by things such as illness or stress, the virus can resurface and cause shingles, Lucas said. Lucas said the shingles vaccine is a one-time vaccination that stimulates the immune system to keep the virus locked up. Although the vaccine does not guarantee prevention, it will likely reduce its severity if the virus were to reappear. According to Lucas, the highest risk groups for shingles are those over the age of 60 or in those who have a weakened immune system because of other diseases such as diabetes. Even if you have had shingles, you can still receive the shingles vaccine to help prevent future occurrences. Because the vaccine is a live virus, Lucas said it should not be given to those who are immunosuppressed such as those on cancer c Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Polyneuropathy?

What Is Diabetic Polyneuropathy?

Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a complication of diabetes, a disease in which patients show high levels of blood sugar over a prolonged time period. These high blood sugar levels can damage different body parts including nerves. It is estimated that about 20% of diabetes patients suffer from DPN according to a large observational study conducted in the UK. What causes diabetic polyneuropathy? Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) occurs if nerves are damaged as a result of diabetes. Because nerves are damaged, DPN is a type of neuropathic pain. Damaged nerves cannot correctly transmit signals from the skin to the brain. Instead, these signals become exaggerated, causing chronic pain that may persist for months or even years. What are the typical diabetic polyneuropathy symptoms? Although diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) can affect all body parts, it is most commonly localized to the extremities, such as the hands or the feet. This is why DPN is also referred to as a type of localized neuropathic pain (LNP). The chronic pain associated with DPN can be described as ‘shooting pain’ or ‘stabbing pain’. Although less common, some patients can experience itching or numbness. What can patients do? Medication can help and early treatment might influence efficacy in a positive way, so it is important to get active. Do you have symptoms that you would describe as ‘shooting pain’ or ‘stabbing pain’? If you have diabetes and think that you might have DPN, please fill out the ‘my pain questionnaire’ and see your doctor at your earliest convenience. Be sure to tell your doctor that you have diabetes and now have chronic pain in the affected area. You can read more about possible treatment options here. Please note: The information on this website cannot replace a patient c Continue reading >>

What Tests Are Used To Diagnose Diabetes?

What Tests Are Used To Diagnose Diabetes?

Tests for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test: This blood test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, which is the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels are, the more hemoglobin you’ll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. If the two A1C test results aren’t similar, the test isn’t available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you’re pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may also use the following tests to find out if you have diabetes: Random blood sugar test: A blood sample will be taken randomly, regardless of when you last ate. A random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests that you may have diabetes. Fasting blood sugar test: A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level between 100 and 125 mg/dL (5.6 and 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it’s 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you’ll be diagnosed with diabetes. Other Tests If your doctor thinks that you may have type 1 diabetes, your urine will be tested to look for the presence of ketones. Ketones are substances that are produced in your body when muscle and fat tissue are used for energy if your body doesn’t have enough insulin to use the available glucose. Sometimes, a blood test called a C peptide level test, which measures the ability of your pancreas to secrete insulin, may be done as well. Levels of C peptide are usually low in people with type 1 diabetes, b Continue reading >>

Shingles Virus

Shingles Virus

Shingles is an illness that can produce fever, headaches, rashes, joint pain, muscle pain, neck pain, nerve pain, and other highly unpleasant symptoms. Typically, a shingles diagnosis is never made if no rash is present. In reality, however, the shingles virus is responsible for millions of peoples mystery symptoms, from unexplained rashes to neurological symptoms to migraines, and more. The prevailing view of shingles is that a red rash or pustules always accompany it. However, this is merely the classic presentation of one type of the virus that causes shingles. There are actually 31 varieties of shingles viruses (15 of which are the most common), and they all cause different symptoms. Seven of the shingles strains do cause rashes, just not always in expected areas, while the other eight strains cause no rashes. So if youre experiencing most of the symptoms of shingles but have no signs of it on your skin, its possible you have a non-rash shingles virus. There are seven strains of shingles that cause rashes. Theyre primarily distinguished by the different types and locations of rashes they create. These include: classic shingles (rashes appearing anywhere from the chest to the feet) upper body (rashes appearing from the chest up but not on the arms) head (rash on the top and sides of the head) vaginal shingles (appears outside but near the vagina, or inside the crotch area) A misconception about shingles is that the virus resides directly under the rash, wherever it happens to be, but it actually lies much deeper, awaiting an opportunity to inflame your nervous system. In these strains, the virus releases a neurotoxin that travels to your peripheral nerves and skin. It is this neurotoxin that causes the rash and pustules for which shingles is so famous. There are eig Continue reading >>

Association Of Herpes Zoster And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Association Of Herpes Zoster And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract The purpose of our study was to determine the association of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and the risk of herpes zoster (HZ). In this cohort study, we selected 4736 patients with T1DM registered in the Catastrophic Illness Patient Database who received insulin therapy before 2003 and 18944 participants without DM who were selected by frequency matched based on sex and age. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to measure the hazard ratios (HRs) of HZ in the T1DM group compared with that in the non-T1DM group. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that the adjusted HR of HZ was 2.38 times higher for patients in the T1DM group (95% CI = 1.77–3.19) than for those in the non-T1DM group. According to diabetes severity, mild and serious T1DM patients were associated with a higher risk of HZ (adjusted HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.67–3.05; and adjusted HR = 5.08, 95% CI = 2.66–9.71, respectively) than subjects without T1DM. Figures Citation: Chen H-H, Lin I-C, Chen H-J, Yeh S-Y, Kao C-H (2016) Association of Herpes Zoster and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. PLoS ONE 11(5): e0155175. Editor: Lars Kaderali, University Medicine Greifswald, GERMANY Received: December 2, 2015; Accepted: April 4, 2016; Published: May 12, 2016 Copyright: © 2016 Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Data Availability: All data and related metadata were deposited in an appropriate public repository. The data on the study population that were obtained from the NHIRD (are maintained in the NHIRD (The NHRI is a nonprofit foundation established by the government. Fund Continue reading >>

Combo Treatment Relieves Shingles, Diabetes Nerve Pain

Combo Treatment Relieves Shingles, Diabetes Nerve Pain

Taking Neurontin and morphine together relieves nerve pain from shingles and diabetes better than either drug alone, researchers report. Neurontin and morphine are both used alone to treat nerve pain. But researchers wanted to see if using the two drugs together would offer even greater benefit without causing too many side effects. Soothing Nerve Pain The study looked at people with two common forms of nerve pain: 35 men and women with painful nerve damage due to diabetes, and 22 with painful nerve damage from shingles. Nerve pain from diabetes, called diabetic neuropathy, is common. Over time, high blood sugar levels from diabetes can damage nerves throughout the body, most commonly in the feet. In shingles, after the rash resolves, people can be left with nerve damage that can cause pain for weeks to years. This is called postherpetic neuralgia. Least Pain With Neurontin/Morphine Combo Researchers Ian Gilron, MD, of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, and colleagues gave study participants four different treatments for five weeks at a time. Patients received Neurontin, morphine, the two drugs in combination, or what researchers call an "active placebo." That’s a drug – in this case, the anti-anxiety drug Ativan – that has some effect and which keeps patients from guessing they are getting a placebo. Ativan causes some sedation but does not relieve pain. Patients rated their pain on a 1 to 10 scale where 1 is no pain and 10 is the worst pain imaginable. They started out with an average pain score of 5.72. They rated their pain at 3.06 after getting the combination treatment – significantly better than their 3.7 rating for morphine alone, their 4.15 rating for Neurontin alone, and their 4.49 rating for the placebo. Good News for Side Effects There was more Continue reading >>

Vaccination Practices For People With Diabetes Aade Practice Synopsis

Vaccination Practices For People With Diabetes Aade Practice Synopsis

Introduction Influenza, pneumococcal, hepatitis B, tetanus, pertussis, and shingles are common preventable infectious diseases with high morbidity and mortality in people with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, renal failure, and in the elderly.1 Observational study of patients with a wide variety of chronic illnesses has shown that these conditions are associated with a higher hospitalization rate and complications compared to persons without chronic health conditions.2,3 Communities with pockets of unvaccinated and undervaccinated populations are at increased risk for outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. 4,5 Background/Rationale and Evidence Annual administration of the influenza vaccine has been shown to decrease diabetes-related hospital admissions for influenza during “flu epidemics†by as much as 79% based on reports of case-controlled series.1 The number of seasonal influenza- associated deaths varies from year to year because of the unpredictability in length and severity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates flu associated deaths ranged from a low of 3,000 to a high of about 40,000 during flu seasons from 1976-2007.6 While anyone can have influenza related complications and hospitalizations, serious illness and death, the CDC reports that older adults are especially vulnerable. According to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American College of Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians, vaccinating individuals at high risk before influenza season each year is the most effective measure for reducing the impact of influenza.7 Individuals with diabetes are six times more likely to be hospitalized and three times more likely to die from complicat Continue reading >>

Top 5 Vaccines Recommended For Patients With Diabetes

Top 5 Vaccines Recommended For Patients With Diabetes

Top 5 Vaccines Recommended for Patients with Diabetes Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes may be at an increased risk of certain preventable conditions. Vaccination is recommended for all patients, but is strongly emphasized among young children and older adults. As patients age, they may believe that they no longer need to get routine vaccinations; however, this is not the case. The CDC reports that getting vaccinated can prevent illnesses that take time away from work and loved ones. Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes may be at a higher risk for diseases and infections that can be prevented through vaccination, according to the CDC. The agency recommends that patients with diabetes stay up to date on necessary vaccines. The CDC recommends that patients with diabetes receive the following vaccines: Influenza affects many individuals each year, with some cases resulting in serious illness and even death. The CDC recommends an annual flu shot to prevent seasonal influenza . This vaccine prevents individuals from developing pneumococcal disease, which can result in pneumonia or meningitis. Both conditions can become severe and result in increased healthcare costs or hospitalization. While meningitis can resolve without treatment, it can be life-threatening. This vaccine prevents a hepatitis B infection, which can be contracted through sexual contact. While the condition typically clears on its own, chronic cases can lead to cirrhosis and require a liver transplant. The potent tdap vaccine protects patients against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Tetanus can lead to tightening of the muscles of the head and neck and kills 1 in 10 people with the infection, while diptheria can cause breathing problems, heart failure, paralysis, and death, according to the CDC Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Shingles Shots, And Other Winter Stuff

Ask D'mine: Shingles Shots, And Other Winter Stuff

Welcome to another edition of our diabetes advice column etradordinaire, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. We hate to think about it, but winter is on its way, and vaccinations are on the mind. Wil takes an in-depth look at this prickly issue today, with a few warnings to the wise... {Need help navigating life with diabetes? Email us at [email protected]} Dusty from Alabama, type 2, writes: I have a question about getting the flu, pneumonia and shingles shots. I've heard it's important for diabetics to get a flu shot every year, and I personally always ask for a pneumonia shot, too, because I used to get these respiratory infections that settled into pneumonia. But what about a Shingles shot? Is that important too? I'm not sure my insurance covers it, and I have read that Shingles shots are terribly painful, but the disease would be worse. Do you know if Shingles shots are ever covered for diabetics? Is it a one-time vaccination? How long does it last? And is there anything else I should do to prepare to stay healthy for the winter season? [email protected] D'Mine answers: Great questions! Flu first. Anyone with diabetes or anyone who spends much time kissing someone with diabetes should get an annual flu shot. 'Tis the season right now. Flu season usually starts in October and it takes your body about two weeks to develop the immune response after getting the shot. So get to your doc, your Walgreens (love 'em or hate 'em) or your public health office right now, today, before flu season starts. Getting your flu shot (or nasal spray immunization) is probably the number one thing you can do as a PWD to get ready for winter. The CDC flu page says this year's vaccine will protect us from three strains expected to be the m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Conditions Affecting The Legs And Feet

Diabetic Conditions Affecting The Legs And Feet

The feet and legs are common sites for complications in people with diabetes, and for this reason good foot care is very important. Having diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels that supply your legs and feet. This puts affected people at increased risk of developing ulcers on the feet and legs which can become infected, and in the worst cases, develop gangrene (where the tissue dies, resulting in the need for amputation). Nerve damage An injury to the foot or leg can be painful, but in people suffering from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage due to diabetes) the sensations are dulled and minor injuries may go undetected and untreated, potentially leading to more serious damage. Loss of temperature sensation is also a significant risk factor for injury in people with diabetes. This can result in problems such as burns from hot water or sitting too close to a heater. Diabetic neuropathy can also result in damage to the joints, bones, muscles and structure of your feet. In addition to numbness, diabetic neuropathy can sometimes also result in unpleasant feelings such as tingling, pain and burning in the legs and feet. Poor circulation Circulatory disorders, particularly blocked arteries, commonly occur in the lower extremities of people with diabetes. If injured, areas with poor circulation heal badly and, if left unattended, such injuries may develop into ulcers or even become gangrenous. If blood supply is severely impaired, ulcers can occur even in the absence of injury. A lack of blood supply to the leg muscles can also lead to pain in the legs when walking, which typically comes on after walking a certain distance and is relieved by rest. This is known as intermittent claudication. Infection High blood sugar levels can increase your risk of infections. Sores Continue reading >>

Complications

Complications

Complications of shingles are more likely if you have a weakened immune system (the body's natural defence system) or are elderly. Some of the main complications associated with shingles are described below. Postherpetic neuralgia Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of shingles. It's not clear exactly how many people are affected, but some estimates suggest as many as one in five people over 50 could develop postherpetic neuralgia as the result of shingles. Postherpetic neuralgia can cause severe nerve pain (neuralgia) and intense itching that persists after the rash and any other symptoms of shingles have gone. Types of pain experienced by people with postherpetic neuralgia include: constant or intermittent burning, aching, throbbing, stabbing, or shooting pain allodynia – where you feel pain from something that should not be painful, such as changes in temperature or the wind hyperalgesia – where you are very sensitive to pain Postherpetic neuralgia sometimes resolves after around three to six months, although it can last for years and some cases can be permanent. It can be treated with a number of different painkilling medicines. Read about treating postherpetic neuralgia. Eye problems If one of your eyes is affected by shingles (ophthalmic shingles), there's a risk you could develop further problems in the affected eye, such as: sores (ulceration) and permanent scarring of the surface of your eye (cornea) inflammation of the eye and optic nerve, the nerve that transmits signals from the eye to the brain glaucoma – where pressure builds up inside the eye If not treated promptly, there's a risk that ophthalmic shingles could cause a degree of permanent vision loss. Ramsay Hunt syndrome Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a complication that can occur if s Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Herpes Zoster

Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Herpes Zoster

Go to: Introduction Herpes zoster (HZ) is the reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV) that becomes latent after primary infection within the dorsal root ganglia. It affects about 20% of the population mainly the elderly. The factors that are responsible for reactivation are not well known, but appear to be dependent on a balance between virus and host factors. During reactivation, VZV overwhelms immune control and spreads in the affected ganglia and sensory nerves to the skin.1 Immune dysfunction in certain diseases states is a potent trigger for HZ. Most commonly, advanced age, which acts as a surrogate for waning of cell-mediated immunity, is an important recognized risk factor.2 In patients with impaired immunity, both the incidence and severity of HZ are increased.3 This is seen in malignancies especially lymphoma, patients receiving immunosuppression therapy and HIV infection.4 Diabetes mellitus (DM) comprises a group of metabolic disorders that share the phenotype of hyperglycemia. The incidence of DM has increased in the past two decades. Individuals with DM have a greater frequency and severity of infections. Several rare infections are seen almost exclusively in diabetic population. The reasons for this include abnormality in cell mediated immunity and phagocyte functions associated with hyperglycemia.5 Undiagnosed DM especially type 2 is common, with an estimated lag of five to seven years between the onset of the disease and diagnosis. It is estimated that up to fifty percent of people are unaware of their disease. Incidence of undiagnosed DM increase with age. The size of the undiagnosed fraction of adults with diabetes is a major public health concern, heightened by the evidence that the latent stage is likely to be long, and that diabetes-related comp Continue reading >>

What Is Shingles And What Causes It?

What Is Shingles And What Causes It?

You can think of shingles as the one-two punch of infections. Anyone who ever gets it had a case of the chickenpox first, often many decades earlier. The reason these two conditions are paired up: They come from the same virus. Chickenpox causes itchy blisters that might start on your back, chest, and face and spread to the rest of your body. Shingles is a rash with shooting pain. It usually shows up on just one side of your body. If you start to feel tingly and itchy on one side of your torso and then notice a rash, call your doctor. She can examine you and figure out whether you have shingles. Double the Trouble The virus that gets the blame for both conditions is varicella zoster. When it gets into your body, the first problem it causes is chickenpox, also called varicella. You may think of it as a childhood disease, but adults can get it, too. After the chickenpox runs its itchy course, the virus retreats to nerve tissues near your spinal cord and brain, where it hides out. Doctors don’t know why, but sometimes the virus “wakes up” and travels along nerve fibers to your skin. That’s when it lands its second punch -- shingles, also called herpes zoster. Who Gets It? We know that a weakened immune system might wake the virus up. If you’ve had chickenpox, you’re more likely to get shingles if you: Have cancer, HIV, or another disease that lower your body’s defenses Are 50 or older Are under a lot of stress Have had a physical trauma Take long-term steroids or other medicines that can weaken your immune system But many people who get shingles do not fit in any of these categories. Continue reading >>

Shingles

Shingles

What are risk factors for shingles? Shingles can only occur in individuals who have previously been exposed to the varicella zoster virus. Risk factors for the development of shingles include the following: Increasing age: Though shingles can rarely occur in children, it is much more common in older adults, with the incidence increasing with age. This is thought to be in large part due to waning immunity as people age. Approximately 50% of all cases of shingles occur in adults 60 years of age or older. Weakened immune system: Individuals with impaired immune systems have a higher probability of developing shingles. This can be seen in diseases such as cancer and HIV/AIDS, or in individuals taking certain medications. Patients taking steroids or other immunosuppressive medications, such as people who have undergone organ transplants, and individuals with certain autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis) are at increased risk for developing shingles. Psychological and emotional stressors are also thought to possibly contribute to the development of shingles, perhaps from the detrimental effects of stress on the immune system and the person's health. What is the contagious period for shingles? The virus that causes shingles, the varicella zoster virus, can be transmitted from person to person by direct contact with the fluid from the active blistering rash. Therefore, susceptible individuals should avoid contact with people who have active shingles, especially pregnant women who have never had chickenpox and immunocompromised individuals. It cannot be transmitted by coughing or sneezing, and it is not contagious before the blisters appear. Once the shingles rash has dried and developed crusting Continue reading >>

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