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Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Empowering Your Patient Is Powerful Medicine.

Empowering Your Patient Is Powerful Medicine.

- Resources | Algorithms & Guidelines | Order Patient Materials | DSME Information - Empowering your patient is powerful medicine. As the number of people with diabetes grows, so do the demands on your time and practice. It can be challenging to spend the time necessary to help patients understand their diabetes and make lifestyle changes to protect their health. Patients who arent fully committed are less likely to meet follow-up guidelines, so they require more frequent office visits. Patients who are empowered to manage their own care tend to have better outcomes. Effective diabetes self-management is possible. The Texas Diabetes Council Tool Kit can show you how. The Texas Diabetes Councils Diabetes Tool Kit was prepared by an interdisciplinary team of certified diabetes educators (CDEs) and professional staff of the Texas Department of State Health Services Diabetes Prevention and Control Program to be of service to Texas practitioners and diabetes educators working with patients who have diabetes. Many partners contribute to its development, revision, and distribution. Self-management training content based on the National Standards for Diabetes Education Minimum standards of care and evidence-based treatment algorithms prepared by endocrinologists, physicians, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and other professionals appointed to the Medical Professionals Advisory Subcommittee of the Texas Diabetes Council The Diabetes Tool Kit is a resource that includes professional and patient education materials. It assists primary care providers, educators, and health plans in delivering quality care and implementing quality improvement efforts. Copy masters of patient handouts in English and Spanish help primary care providers and educators address basic self-management edu Continue reading >>

Implementing Key Drivers For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support Programs: Early Outcomes, Activities, Facilitators, And Barriers

Implementing Key Drivers For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support Programs: Early Outcomes, Activities, Facilitators, And Barriers

Implementing Key Drivers for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Programs: Early Outcomes, Activities, Facilitators, and Barriers Jennifer Murphy Morgan, MSPH1; Yvonne Mensa-Wilmot, PhD, MPH1; Shelly-Ann Bowen, PhD, MS2; Monica Murphy, MPH2; Timethia Bonner, DPM, PhD3; Stephanie Rutledge, PhD, MA1; Gia Rutledge, MPH1 ( View author affiliations ) Suggested citation for this article: Morgan JM, Mensa-Wilmot Y, Bowen S, Murphy M, Bonner T, Rutledge S, et al. Implementing Key Drivers for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Programs: Early Outcomes, Activities, Facilitators, and Barriers. Prev Chronic Dis 2018;15:170399. DOI: . Diabetes, a serious and costly condition, is characterized by illness and death from long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications (1). Additionally, numerous and well-known comorbidities can accompany diabetes, including cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, amputations, and nephropathy (1). Often these complications and comorbidities interfere with a persons ability to self-manage their diabetes (2). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) projects that as many as 1 in 3 adults could have diabetes by 2050 (3). In 2012, the United States spent an estimated $245 billion on diabetes care, including $176 billion in direct medical costs and $69 billion in indirect costs from lost workdays, restricted activity, disability, and early death (4). Many costly complications among people with diabetes can be prevented or delayed with appropriate preventive care and self-management (5). CDCs National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion leads efforts to address the chronic disease burden effectively and equitably in the US population. Generally positioned as the primary public health authority su Continue reading >>

Literacy-appropriate Educational Materials And Brief Counseling Improve Diabetes Self-management

Literacy-appropriate Educational Materials And Brief Counseling Improve Diabetes Self-management

Literacy-appropriate educational materials and brief counseling improve diabetes self-management eUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, NC, USA dUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA eUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, NC, USA aUniversity of New Mexico, College of Nursing, Albuquerque, NM, USA bUniversity of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA cLouisiana State University, Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA dUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA eUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Darren A. DeWalt: [email protected]_nerrad *Corresponding author at: Division of General Internal Medicine, 5039 Old Clinic Building, CB#7110, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Tel.: +1 919 966 2276; fax: +1 919 966 2274 The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Patient Educ Couns See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. In this pilot study, we evaluated the impact of providing patients with a literacy-appropriate diabetes education guide accompanied by brief counseling designed for use in primary care. We provided the Living with Diabetes guide and brief behavior change counseling to 250 English and Spanish speaking patients with type 2 diabetes. Counseling sessions using collaborative goal setting occurred at baseline and by telephone at 2 and 4 weeks. We measured patients' activation, self-efficacy, diabetes distress, knowledge, and self-care at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Statistically si Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Curriculum Topics In Diabetes

Patient Education: Curriculum Topics In Diabetes

Patient Education: Curriculum Topics in Diabetes Nancyellen Brennan, F.N.P., C.D.E., Rita Rastogi Kalyani, M.D., M.H.S. Patient Education: Curriculum Topics in Diabetes is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide. To view the entire topic, please sign in or purchase a subscription . Official website of the Johns Hopkins Antibiotic (ABX), HIV, Diabetes, and Psychiatry Guides, powered by Unbound Medicine. Johns Hopkins Guide App for iOS, iPhone, iPad, and Android included. Explore these free sample topics: -- The first section of this topic is shown below -- Coordinated set of information and educational experiences which include learning outcomes and effective teaching strategies DSME (Diabetes Self Management Education) is a structured and continuous process of learning the knowledge and skills necessary for successful management of diabetes. DSMT (Diabetes Self Management Training) is diabetes education provided by sites (clinics, pharmacies, hospital based diabetes centers) whose education program has been approved either by the American Diabetes Association or the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Group and individual education provided by these approved centers is reimbursed by medicare In the U.S., a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) is a health care professional who has special training in diabetes education, completed 1000 hours of patient education in diabetes, and passed a standardized examination. Other countries are just beginning to develop their own CDE programs. -- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please sign in or purchase a subscription -- Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Self-management Education?

What Is Diabetes Self-management Education?

Diabetes self-management education helps people to stay healthy and prevent costly complications, yet very few people with diabetes attend a course. Diabetes UK's Taking Control campaign aims to increase the provision and uptake of diabetes self-management education, so that everyone with diabetes has the skills and confidence to take control of their condition. This page gives healthcare professionals and local decision makers more information about patient education options. It includes resources to use with your patients and advice on improving uptake. People learn about their condition in different ways. A useful framework for understanding diabetes education, broadly based on a model used in Scotland, is in three levels: Level three: Structured education that meets nationally-agreed criteria (defined byNICE/SIGN), including an evidence-based curriculum, quality assurance of teaching standards and regular audit. Level two: Ongoing learning that may be quite informal, perhaps through a peer group. Level one: Information and one-to-one advice. Level three education: what is the evidence base? Diabetes education courses, often known as structured education, improve key outcomes, reduce the onset of complications and are cost effective or even cost saving. For a summary of the published evidence on structured education download Diabetes UK's reportDiabetes Education: the big missed opportunity in diabetes care (PDF, 285KB). Level three education: how to improve uptake and quality A short guide from Diabetes UK, including what your patients need to know about diabetes education and tips to improve attendance (see also key downloads).A short guide from Diabetes UK, including what your patients need to know about diabetes education and tips to improve attendance (see also Continue reading >>

Literacy-appropriate Educational Materials And Brief Counseling Improve Diabetes Self-management.

Literacy-appropriate Educational Materials And Brief Counseling Improve Diabetes Self-management.

Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Jun;75(3):328-33. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2008.12.017. Epub 2009 Jan 23. Literacy-appropriate educational materials and brief counseling improve diabetes self-management. University of New Mexico, College of Nursing, Albuquerque, NM, USA. In this pilot study, we evaluated the impact of providing patients with a literacy-appropriate diabetes education guide accompanied by brief counseling designed for use in primary care. We provided the Living with Diabetes guide and brief behavior change counseling to 250 English and Spanish speaking patients with type 2 diabetes. Counseling sessions using collaborative goal setting occurred at baseline and by telephone at 2 and 4 weeks. We measured patients' activation, self-efficacy, diabetes distress, knowledge, and self-care at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Statistically significant (pContinue reading >>

Analytics Support The Delivery Of Effective Diabetes Self-management Education

Analytics Support The Delivery Of Effective Diabetes Self-management Education

Add “Using analytics, we are able to identify patients who are not yet using an insulin pump. Rather than waiting until a patient is on an insulin pump to provide education, we can now provide education to potential pump candidates to support their decision-making process, increasing readiness for self-management.” – Sarah Lyons, MD Endocrinologist EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Effectively educating pediatric and adolescent patients and families to self-manage diabetes is a critical part of diabetes care. Leaders at Texas Children’s Hospital, one of the top four children’s hospitals in the country, recognized that diabetes education that incorporates national standards and empowers patients can improve clinical outcomes and quality of life. While diabetes education has always been important to Texas Children’s, the education provided to patients was varied, no organizational standards existed, and tracking the effectiveness was not possible. To address these challenges, Texas Children’s created an Education Care Process Team (CPT) that focused on: developing a standard education curriculum based on national guidelines, creating consistent education materials, leveraging powerful analytics to identify potential learning gaps and customize patient goals, and investing in the professionals who deliver education. As a result of these efforts, Texas Children’s achieved the following: Implementation of a standard diabetes education curriculum. 97.5 percent relative improvement in the percent of diabetes educators who are CDEs. 70.7 percent of patients with diabetes have had an education visit with a CDE, and the hospital is on track to achieve its goal of 80 percent within the year. RECOGNIZING THE IMPORTANT ROLE OF EDUCATION IN IMPROVING OUTCOMES Texas Children’s Hospi Continue reading >>

Patient Education Handout Diabetes Self Management A1c Test | Ndei

Patient Education Handout Diabetes Self Management A1c Test | Ndei

NDEI Patient Education Handouts Reinforce Self Empowerment for Optimal Diabetes Care NOVEMBER 25, 2013: The National Diabetes Education Initiative (NDEI) today announced the publication of two patient education handouts reinforcing the importance of patient self-management and awareness for optimal diabetes care. The diabetes patient education materials are the latest in a series supporting National Diabetes Month, celebrated each year in November to raise diabetes awareness and encourage action to change the way the disease is treated. The first of NDEIs two new patient education handouts , Managing Your Type 2 Diabetes: The Basics, covers essential self-management skills aimed at empowering people with type 2 diabetes to make informed decisions affecting their care. The second patient resource , The A1C Test for People with Type 2 Diabetes, enables enhanced understanding of the A1C testwhat it is, why its important, and how often it should be used. Each handout is available as a free download on NDEIs award-winning website, NDEI.org . Registered members of NDEI.org can customize the handouts to feature their name and practice address. Nearly 26 million US adults aged 20 years or older have diabetes, with type 2 diabetesthe preventable formaccounting for about 95% of cases. Approximately 80 million more US adults have prediabetes, a condition that increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Left undiagnosed or untreated, diabetes can lead to a host of serious health issues, including obesity, heart disease, blindness, amputations, kidney disease, and death. The total estimated health expenditure of diagnosed diabetes in 2012 was $245 billiona 41% increase since previous estimates were calculated in 2007. NDEI.org is a premier, award-winning destination for diab Continue reading >>

Patient Education | Ctc-ri

Patient Education | Ctc-ri

The Mayo Clinic's National Resource Center for Shared Decision Making has developed and tested simple tools called KerCards that providers can use to help patients make decisions about diabetes medications , osteoporosis treatment , and statin options . TheNational Resource Center for Shared Decision Making is also testing similar decision aids for treatment after acute myocardial infarction and for chest pain . The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services have produced useful guide for clinicians entitled: Self-Measured Blood Pressure Monitoring Action Steps for Clinicians . Purdue Health Care Alliance Development Team recently updated theirHandbook for People with Pain, which includes recommendations to promote and enable self-care management of pain. The Handbook can be found here . The Rhode Island Department of Health offers the Provider Resource Guide for Patients with Chronic Conditions . This brochure describes evidence-based supplemental health improvement services that support patients, families, providers, and the healthcare system in disease management, self-management, and patient activation. The Rhode Island Department of Health offers the Wellness Resource Guide Programs proven to work . A handy booklet for patients with congestive heart failure to use to manage their heart health. The Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (DPCP) at the Rhode Island Department of Health is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and works to address the burden of diabetes in the state through coordination of the Rhode Island Statewide Diabetes Health System (RI-SDHS). DPCP projects and activities are directed at quality diabetes clinical care, workforce development, multicultural programs, diabetes patient Continue reading >>

National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education

National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education

Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a critical element of care for all people with diabetes and is necessary in order to improve patient outcomes. The National Standards for DSME are designed to define quality diabetes self-management education and to assist diabetes educators in a variety of settings to provide evidence-based education. Because of the dynamic nature of health care and diabetes-related research, these Standards are reviewed and revised approximately every 5 years by key organizations and federal agencies within the diabetes education community. A Task Force was jointly convened by the American Association of Diabetes Educators and the American Diabetes Association in the summer of 2006. Additional organizations that were represented included the American Dietetic Association, the Veteran's Health Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Indian Health Service, and the American Pharmaceutical Association. Members of the Task Force included a person with diabetes; several health services researchers/behaviorists, registered nurses, and registered dietitians; and a pharmacist. The Task Force was charged with reviewing the current DSME standards for their appropriateness, relevance, and scientific basis. The Standards were then reviewed and revised based on the available evidence and expert consensus. The committee convened on 31 March 2006 and 9 September 2006, and the Standards were approved 25 March 2007. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information For Health Professionals

Diabetes Information For Health Professionals

Diabetes Awareness and Education Materials The National Diabetes Education Program can provide bulk copies of patient education materials in a variety of languages for your patients. To obtain this diabetes education materials, visit www.ndep.nih.gov . Low literacy material are available to download at www.learningaboutdiabetes.org . The Connecticut Department of Public Health has developed low literacy diabetes materials . Referrals to Diabetes Self-management Education Centers Several studies have demonstrated the effectiveness and cost savings of diabetes self-management education. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a critical element of care for all people with diabetes and is necessary in order to improve patient outcomes. Receiving diabetes self-management education has been shown to be positively associated with higher levels of comprehensive diabetes clinical care which in turn can help prevent the costly complications of diabetes. (1) Other studies have shown costs can be reduced by referrals to DSME, specifically in disadvantaged areas. (2) Currently CT based insurances and the Medicare program cover DSME. Johnson, et.al. Association between Self-Management Education and Comprehensive Diabetes Clinical Care. Diabetes Spectrum, winter 2010, 41-46. Duncan, et al. Assessing the Value of Diabetes Education. The Diabetes Educator 35(5) 752-760. For more information on the locations of diabetes education centers, visit the Diabetes Prevention and Control Programs Self-managementWeb Site . Referrals to Community-Based Self-management Programs The Connecticut Diabetes Prevention and Control Program works closely with partners for the State Department on Aging to coordinate the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-man Continue reading >>

Smrc - Smrc

Smrc - Smrc

Working more effectively with health care providers Participants will make weekly action plans, share experiences, and help each other solve problems they encounter in creating and carrying out their self-management program. Does the Program replace existing programs and treatments? The program does not conflict with existing programs or treatment. Treatment is not altered. For medical questions, participants are referred to their physicians or diabetes educators. If the content of the workshop conflicts with instructions they receive elsewhere, they are advised to follow their physicians' orders and discuss discrepancies with the physician. The original Diabetes Self-Management Program was developed in Spanish. After successful outcomes were found with that program, the Stanford Patient Education Research Center received a grant from theCalifornia HealthCare Foundationfor the randomized, controlled study to test the workshop's effectiveness for English-speakers. The study was completed in 2008. Six months after the workshop, participants had significant improvements in depression, symptoms of hypoglycemia, communication with physicians, healthy eating, and reading food labels. They also had significant improvements in patient activation and self-efficacy. At 12 months, DSMP participants continued to demonstrate improvements in depression, communication with physicians, healthy eating, patient activation, and self-efficacy. There were no significant changes in utilization or A1C (A1C values were already in the desirable range at the beginning of the study for most particpants).** Trainings for representatives of health care organizations are 4 days. We offer web-based cross-training for those who have already been trained to offer the Chronic Disease Self-Management Pr Continue reading >>

Tdc Tool Kit - Dsme Information

Tdc Tool Kit - Dsme Information

Diabetes Self-Management Join forces with the experts. You are the expert in caring for your patients. Diabetes educators are experts in helping people manage diabetes. Together, you form a team to help patients with diabetes adopt positive changes that delay or prevent complications. Why collaborate with a diabetes educator? Diabetes educators provide a level of attention that you can’t achieve in short office visits. They coach patients to understand diabetes in the context of their own lives and work with them to set – and meet – behavior changes to improve their health. And they keep you informed about patient progress at every step. Diabetes educators enhance your practice by: Spending more time with patients as they provide training, counseling, and follow-up. Helping you meet pay-for-performance and quality improvement goals. Providing status reports about patient progress. Emphasizing the role that self-management plays in preventing the onset of diabetes-related health complications. Visit the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) to learn more about making a referral and finding a licensed diabetes educator near you. Website for Patients: Prevent and Manage Diabetes Empowering your patients is strong medicine. Help patients answer questions about diabetes prevention and management with this website, available in English and Spanish. Download Materials Order Form for Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Medical Nutrition Therapy This form was created to capture all information required for successful patient referral. The back of the form has helpful information about DSME, including an algorithm describing when patients should be referred for additional services. Intended Use: This form is a guide for use by primary care physicians o Continue reading >>

Patient Education Materials

Patient Education Materials

The Physician Alliance created the following patient education marketing materials for our practices to use to stimulate conversations with patients regarding important preventive screenings, decreasing utilization of tests and more. Practices are encouraged to display in waiting areas and exam rooms, and share with patients. An order form is also available below for select materials to be sent from The Physician Alliance. The patient education marketing materials are available complimentary to The Physician Alliance member practices. If you are not a member practice but would like to order materals, please contact us . The following forms can be downloaded and printed for use in your practice: Patient asthma self management form (9 years and under) Patient asthma self management form (10 years and older) Patient healthy lifestyle self management form (17 years and under) Patient healthy lifestyle self management form (18 years and older) Patient heart failure self management goals form The following materials can be downloaded/printed or copies can be ordered via the below online form: 6 tips women should know about Pap tests poster 6 facts you should know about using antibiotics for bronchitis poster 6 facts about breast cancer screening poster 6 facts about colorectal cancer screening poster Rx 'non-prescription pad' (antibiotics)* flyer Rx 'non-prescription pad' (PEDIATRICS antiobiotics)* flyer Rx 'non-prescription pad' (low back pain)* flyer *TPA practices can receive a 'non-prescription pad' of 25 sheets by submitting your order below. Complete the order form below to have The Physician Alliance send printed materials to your practice. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Continue reading >>

Review Article Diabetes Self-management Education For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review Of The Effect On Glycemic Control

Review Article Diabetes Self-management Education For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review Of The Effect On Glycemic Control

Highlights • DSME appears most effective when group and individualized intervention are combined (74). • DSME appears most effective delivered by a team rather than single provider (65). • People in poor glycemic control benefit from participation in quality DSME (65). • More than 10 hours of DSME increases the likelihood of resulting in significant A1C improvement (84). • Time period over which DSME is delivered does not affect its impact on A1C (62). Abstract Assess effect of diabetes self-management education and support methods, providers, duration, and contact time on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, and PsycINFO to December 2013 for interventions which included elements to improve participants’ knowledge, skills, and ability to perform self-management activities as well as informed decision-making around goal setting. This review included 118 unique interventions, with 61.9% reporting significant changes in A1C. Overall mean reduction in A1C was 0.74 and 0.17 for intervention and control groups; an average absolute reduction in A1C of 0.57. A combination of group and individual engagement results in the largest decreases in A1C (0.88). Contact hours ≥10 were associated with a greater proportion of interventions with significant reduction in A1C (70.3%). In patients with persistently elevated glycemic values (A1C > 9), a greater proportion of studies reported statistically significant reduction in A1C (83.9%). This systematic review found robust data demonstrating that engagement in diabetes self-management education results in a statistically significant decrease in A1C levels. The data suggest mode of delivery, hours of engagement, and baseline A1C can affect the likelihood of achieving stat Continue reading >>

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