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Dry Sauna Heat Helps The Heart

Dry Sauna Heat Helps The Heart

Oct. 1, 2001 - Dry sauna baths help the heart the same way exercise does, Japanese researchers report. The findings don't mean you should become a baked couch potato. They instead hint at a new way you can reduce your risk of heart disease . It seems to help people at risk of heart disease : those who have high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels , those with diabetes , or those who smoke. It also seems to help people who already have heart problems. "We have seen many patients with severe heart failure whose clinical symptoms improved dramatically by repeated sauna therapy," lead study author Chuwa Tei, MD, tells WebMD. Tei says the research team has evidence that repeated sauna treatment improves the blood vessel and heart function of patients with chronic heart failure. "The effect of sauna is similar to exercise for patients with coronary risk factors," Tei says, adding that the advantage of sauna compared to exercise also is applicable to patients with walking disturbances or to patients who can't exercise because of heart failure. The dry sauna used in this "thermal therapy" is not as hot as the saunas normally used in Japan and in Europe, warns Tei, who leads the internal medicine department at Japan's Kagoshima University. The treatment uses a sauna set at 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60(C), whereas saunas in gyms and hotels often are set at 175-210 degrees Fahrenheit (80-100(C). Tei advises patients to use the low-heat sauna for 15 minutes a day, three to five times per week. After the sauna, patients rest under blankets for 30 minutes. In a study appearing in the current issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Tei and co-workers gave this sauna treatment to 25 men ranging in age from 25 to 51. Three of the men had diabetes ; eight had hig Continue reading >>

Hot Bath Beats Cycling For Lowering Blood Sugar Levels For Type 2 Diabetics

Hot Bath Beats Cycling For Lowering Blood Sugar Levels For Type 2 Diabetics

Hot bath beats cycling for lowering blood sugar levels for type 2 diabetics A hot bath can lower peak blood sugarCredit:Alamy A hotbath could be better than cycling at lowering blood sugar levels for type 2 diabetics , a study suggests. Dr Steve Faulkner of Loughborough Universityinvestigated whether there were any alternatives to exercise which could assist people in maintaining the condition. He found that a soak in the tub reduces peak blood sugar levels by 10 per cent more than an hour cycling, and increases energy expenditure levels by 80 per cent burning 126 calories per hour. Dr Faulkner, who is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate for the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit (BRU), said: We discovered the participants who bathed had, on average, 10 per cent lower peak glucose levels in comparison to the exercise, which was completely unexpected. The amount our blood sugar rises after a meal is one of the risk markers for things like developing type 2 diabetes, so keeping it down can be good for our health. We think the reason is that thebathmay encourage the release of heat shock proteins, which may help lower blood sugar levels by improving insulin controlled glucose uptake. However, although these findings are interesting, we would always encourage increased physical activity and exercise as the best way to maintain good health. A hot bath even beats cycling for lowering peak levelsCredit:AFP/Getty Images The experiment involved 10 unfit males, who all bathed in a (104F) 40C, while wearing a continuous glucose monitor to record changes in their blood sugar during the subsequent 24 hours. The same participants also cycled on a separate day at an intensity that increase Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Repeated Thermal Therapy On Quality Of Life In Patients With Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus.

The Effects Of Repeated Thermal Therapy On Quality Of Life In Patients With Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus.

J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jun;16(6):677-81. doi: 10.1089/acm.2009.0358. The effects of repeated thermal therapy on quality of life in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada. [email protected] Decreased quality of life in diabetes is associated with poor health outcomes. Far-infrared sauna treatments improve the quality of life for those with chronic pain, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, and congestive heart failure. The objective of this study is to determine whether far-infrared saunas have a beneficial effect on quality of life in those with type II diabetes. This was a sequential, longitudinal, interrupted time series design study. The setting was Fraser Lake BC, a rural village in central British Columbia, Canada. All patients of the Fraser Lake Community Health Center with type II diabetes were invited to participate in this study. The study consisted of 20-minute, 3 times weekly infrared sauna sessions, over a period of 3 months. To assess quality of life, subjects completed the 36-item Short-form Health Survey Version 2 (SF-36v2) questionnaire as well as "Zero-to-Ten" Visual Analogue Scales. Baseline study parameters were measured within 1 week prior to commencing sauna sessions. Postintervention measurements were collected between 1 and 3 days after the last sauna session. Physical health, general health, and social functioning indices of the SF-36v2 improved. Visual Analogue Scales for stress and fatigue improved. Far-infrared sauna use maybe associated with improved quality of life in people with type II diabetes mellitus. Uptake of infrared saunas use is greater than the uptake of other lifestyle interventions. Continue reading >>

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat

Lowering Blood Sugar By Turning Up Our Body Heat Some of us might be thrilled if we could manage our blood sugar by sitting in a hot tub or sauna, instead of working up a sweat biking, or using an elliptical. Unfortunately, passively raising our body temperature will never provide the same variety of benefits as aerobic exercise. Yet, research suggests hot baths and saunas may benefit people struggling with insulin resistance or glucose control, and those unable to exercise. The glucose lowering benefit of heat was revealed when some non-diabetic research volunteers, whose blood sugar and core temperatures were monitored, ate similar meals after sitting in a hot bath (104 degrees F) for 60 minutes, and after an hour long bike ride. Researchers were surprised to discover that the participants after-meal glucose readings were 10 percent lower following the steamy bath than after biking. Raising our core temperature may lower post-meal glucose because of HSPs, or heat shock proteins. These proteins are part of the immune system, released as our body temperature rises. HSPs are believed to reduce blood sugar levels by transporting glucose from the blood to our skeletal muscles. While enjoying a 60 minute hot soak before dinner is not a daily option for most of us, incorporating heat therapy into our weekly routine is something to consider since - besides improving insulin sensitivity - hot baths and saunas offer other diabetes-related perks: The researchers found an hour long hot bath increases the bodys energy expenditure by 80 percent. Thats significant, though its far less than the energy spent on a 60 minute bike ride. An hour of pedaling burns about 630 calories, whereas 60 minutes in hot water uses 140 calories. Saunas are more efficient calorie burners than hot bath Continue reading >>

Hot Tub Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Blood Sugar Levels & Improves Sleep

Hot Tub Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Blood Sugar Levels & Improves Sleep

Hot Tub Therapy has found to be useful in controlling Type 2 diabetes. Yes, you read that correctly. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 15.7 million Americans are diabetic. More people are being diagnosed as diabetic every day! Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90% of cases. It is a disorder in which the body is not able to make enough insulin or to properly use insulin to turn the glucose in food into energy. Having Type 2 Diabetes does not mean that it’s the end of the world. With a simple guide to managing Type 2 Diabetes, you can still live a healthy and happy life. Since November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, I thought it would be a good time to shine a spotlight on a serious disease that leads to potentially life-threatening complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and possible amputation. Studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine have given new hope to the millions who suffer from diabetes. “Hot tub therapy” helped a group of Type 2 diabetics reduce their blood sugar levels and improve sleep patterns. (If I had Type 2 diabetes, I”d take those improvements for starters, wouldn’t you?) Hot tubbing was judged beneficial because the effects of partial immersion in a hot tub simulate the beneficial effects of exercise. Physical exercise is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Soaking in a hot tub was found to be beneficial for Type 2 diabetes according to an independent study done by Dr. Philip L. Hooper at the McKee Medical Center in Loveland, Colorado. He studied a group of Type 2 diabetes patients for three weeks. The patients were required to soak in a hot tub for thirty minutes a day, six days a week, for the duration of the study Continue reading >>

Infrared Sauna For Low Blood Sugar | Good Health Saunas

Infrared Sauna For Low Blood Sugar | Good Health Saunas

Home Infrared Sauna Health Benefits Low Blood Sugar How Your Infrared Sauna Helps Low Blood Sugar Medical experts warn that by the year 2050, roughly 33% of American adults will have diabetes. Diabetes impairs the bodys ability to use glucose (the bodys natural source of energy) derived from the foods that we commonly eat. While insulin is naturally produced in the pancreas and delivers glucose to the cells to use as energy, diabetes greatly limits this process. In diabetics, the pancreas cannot properly make insulin and therefore glucose goes undelivered, causing low blood sugar. While many diabetics use infrared saunas to manage their diabetes, is it just the placebo effect, or can an infrared sauna really help with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)? That was the question posed by a University of British Columbia professor in the universitys Department of Family Medicine. In the Journal of Alternative Medicines June 2010 issue, Dr. Beever shared established research into how infrared sauna treatments improved the lives of those with chronic fatigue, congestive heart failure, depression, and a whole range of conditions, but what about diabetes? In Dr. Beevers study at the Fraser Lake Community Health Centre, patients with Type 2 diabetes participated in 20-minute infrared sauna sessions three times per week over the span of three months. Conclusive Improvements for Those with Type II Diabetes Mellitus Dr. Beevers research concluded that infrared sauna use may be associated with improved quality of life in people with type II diabetes mellitus. Since many more are willing to spend time in an infrared sauna than, say, put time in at the gym or drastically alter their diet, Dr. Beever found more were willing to use infrared saunas in managing their diabetes when compared to Continue reading >>

Infrared Sauna Treatment For Diabetes

Infrared Sauna Treatment For Diabetes

The National Institutes of Health, NIH, state that diabetes is one of the leading and major risk factors for both heart attacks and strokes. Though it is considered to be a manageable illness, over time it can be the cause of a great deal of debilitating damage to the body. Diabetes and its resulting high blood glucose wreaks havoc on the human system and can lead to heart issues, blindness, bad circulation, amputation and kidney problems. However, hope is on the horizon in the form of far infrared sauna therapy. A little more about diabetes. This debilitating disease affects over three million people worldwide. Since there is an abundance of food generally low in nutrients with high caloric values, diabetes is evident in epidemic proportions. Add in a decrease in physical activity and diabetes flourishes. Currently on trend is the desire to use fewer pharmaceuticals while maintaining optimal health. There is one effective device in use for over two decades available that accomplishes a reduction in blood sugar levels and the elimination of many if not all medication. What is this wonder drug? Not a drug at all. It is called a far infrared sauna! Evidence implies that far infrared sauna use enhances the quality of life for those suffering from Diabetes along with many other diseases. Far infrared has also been able to treat the symptoms of heart failure, chronic pain and even the depression related to Diabetes. Over the past few years, there have been many studies conducted on the benefits of far infrared therapy. Two studies from 2010 site some interesting new findings in terms of aid to those suffering from diabetes. In April of 2010, Japanese researchers studied the effects of far infrared on patients suffering with type II diabetes. The results published in Acta Me Continue reading >>

Sauna Use Linked To Longer Life, Fewer Fatal Heart Problems

Sauna Use Linked To Longer Life, Fewer Fatal Heart Problems

Sauna use linked to longer life, fewer fatal heart problems Executive Editor, Harvard Women's Health Watch After shoveling for days, breaking up ice dams, and now shivering in this weeks frigid temperatures, I wouldnt mind sitting in a sauna for a bit. A new report in JAMA Internal Medicine makes this pastime even more appealing: regularly spending time in a sauna may help keep the heart healthy and extend life. Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland tracked 2,300 middle-aged men for an average of 20 years. They categorized the men into three groups according to how often they used a sauna each week. The men spent an average of 14 minutes per visit baking in 175 F heat. Over the course of the study, 49% of men who went to a sauna once a week died, compared with 38% of those who went two to three times a week and just 31% of those who went four to seven times a week. Frequent visits to a sauna were also associated with lower death rates from cardiovascular disease and stroke. The results dont surprise Dr. Thomas H. Lee, a cardiologist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Womens Hospital and founding editor of the Harvard Heart Letter. The cardiovascular effects of sauna have been well documented in the past. It lowers blood pressure, and there is every reason to believe that its effects are good for blood vessels, says Dr. Lee. Earlier studies have shown that regular sauna bathing may benefit people with risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Its generally safe and likely beneficial for people with mild heart failure , but may not be so hot for those with unstable angina or a recent heart attack. The researchers were quick to state that because of the unique properties of Finnish saunas, their results arent Continue reading >>

Sweating In The Sauna ???

Sweating In The Sauna ???

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community OK I am a 42 year old Type 2 Diabetic... for a few years (since I was diagnosed about 5 years ago infact) I have been a bad diabetic, definetly eat all the wrong things, and no real form of exercise ! This year I am making a concerted effort to do things the right way... I have started a much healthier diet regime, and am also trainign at a local gym... After a 50 min cardio workout I like to go and chill in the Jacuzzi, Sauna and Steam Room... I remember reading on a Sauna and Steam Room once that Diabetic people are not suppose to do either... can someone give me some information on this ? Are they good or bad ? I am Hyper Glychemic (yes I know I spelt it wrong ! lol) so my sugar levels are usually very high... wondering if it's bad for one type of Diabetics and not others ??? OK Here goes... Remember I am in England (Europe) so we have a different scale to you Americans (who even do Diabetis bigger lol !) Apparerlently a normal person would have a BS of around 5... When I was a bad diabetic (about 5 weeks ago) it was not unusual to have a fastign reading of around 15 give or take a couple points... and after my usual consumption it could be in the high 20's (very worrying !) OK today my ingers feel like a pin cushion... I started by taking a fasting reading which was 9.9 (still a little high for my liking) I had my hearty lunch which was probably more than I should of had (still getting the diet right) 2 prawn and cucumber wholemeal rolls and a soup bumped my BS to 13.6 ! OK here's the interesting bit... I did a 50 minute cardio workout... when I took the reading after this workout my BS had plumeted to 5.7 which would seem a good thing no ? I then Continue reading >>

What People With Diabetes Should Know About Hot Tubs

What People With Diabetes Should Know About Hot Tubs

What People With Diabetes Should Know About Hot Tubs What People With Diabetes Should Know About Hot Tubs This content is created by Healthgrades and brought to you by an advertising sponsor. More This content is created or selected by the Healthgrades editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to the Healthgrades medical review process for accuracy, balance and objectivity. The content is not edited or otherwise influenced by the advertisers appearing on this page except with the possible suggestion of the broad topic area. For more information, read the Healthgrades advertising policy. A diabetes specialist, called an endocrinologist, has the right skills and insight to help you stay in control of your diabetes. Taking a soak in a spa or hot tub can release tension from your musclesand your mind. Some evidence even suggests it can help control your diabetes. As the hot water boosts your core temperature, your body activates its natural cooling mechanisms. Blood vessels near your skin dilate to release some of the extra heat youve absorbed. This increase in blood flow has beneficial effects, especially if you cant exercise. More nutrient-rich blood reaches your muscles as a result. In some studies, regular hot tub visits actually reduced blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. But before you self-medicate with whirlpool jets and chlorine, check with your doctor. Hot tubs also present some added risks for people with diabetes. Diabetes can contribute to nerve damage, leaving your feet less sensitive to hot or cold temperatures. Stepping into boiling water could scald you before you feel a thing. To prevent burns, keep the water temperature at 105F (40.5C)or lower. Always dip your elbow in first to test the waters. Though you ma Continue reading >>

Contraindications - Sunlighten

Contraindications - Sunlighten

Our infrared saunas operate with the same efficacy in your home as in a medical facility. Like all professional equipment, you may put yourself at risk if you do not fully understand how to use the sauna. Infrared sauna use as creating a cure for or treating any disease is neither implied nor should be inferred. Drinking an electrolyte-replacing water or a sports drink is strongly recommended before and after use. Never sleep inside the sauna while it is on Do not use harsh cleaning agents on the interior of the sauna Do not stack or store objects on top of or inside the sauna Do not use during an electrical storm, as there is a remote risk of shock Altering or tampering with any electrical connections on the power supply is dangerous and will void the warranty Do not attempt a repair without consulting Sunlighten first. Unauthorized repair attempts will void the warranty If any of the below apply to you, consult your physician prior to sauna use: Cardiovascular Issues, Obesity or Diabetes Individuals suffering from obesity or with a medical history of heart disease, low or high blood pressure, circulatory problems or diabetes should consult a physician prior to use. Heat stress increases cardiac output and blood flow in an effort to transfer internal body heat to the outside environment via the skin (perspiration) and respiratory system. This takes place primarily due to major changes in the heart rate, which has the potential to increase by thirty (30) beats per minute for each degree increase in core body temperature. Medications Individuals who are using prescription drugs should seek the advice of their personal physician since some medications may induce drowsiness, while others may affect heart rate, blood pressure and circulation. Diuretics, barbiturates and be Continue reading >>

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you should be aware of foot damage as a potential complication. Foot damage is often caused by poor circulation and nerve damage. Both of these conditions can be caused by high blood sugar levels over time. Taking good care of your feet can help lower your risk of foot damage. Although some people soak their feet in Epsom salt baths, this home remedy isn’t recommended for people with diabetes. Soaking your feet may raise your risk of foot problems. Talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in Epsom salts. Epsom salt is also called magnesium sulphate. It’s a mineral compound that’s sometimes used as a home remedy for sore muscles, bruises, and splinters. In some cases, people add Epsom salt to baths or tubs to soak in. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in an Epsom salt bath. Soaking your feet may actually increase your risk of foot problems. It’s recommended that you wash your feet every day, but you shouldn’t soak them. Soaking can dry out your skin. This can cause cracks to form and lead to infections. Some people may recommend Epsom salts as a magnesium supplement. Instead, you should look for magnesium supplements designed for oral use. Check the vitamin and supplement aisle at your local pharmacy. People with diabetes often have low levels of magnesium, a mineral that plays an important role in your body. Research suggests that oral magnesium supplements may help improve blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels in some people with diabetes. Unless your doctor advises otherwise, avoid using Epsom salt footbaths. If you’re interested in oral magnesium supplements, ask your doctor for more information. They can help you assess the potential benefits and risks of taking them. They can also recommend a Continue reading >>

Do Infrared Saunas Have Any Health Benefits? - Mayo Clinic

Do Infrared Saunas Have Any Health Benefits? - Mayo Clinic

An infrared sauna is a type of sauna that uses light to create heat. This type of sauna is sometimes called a far-infrared sauna "far" describes where the infrared waves fall on the light spectrum. A traditional sauna uses heat to warm the air, which in turn warms your body. An infrared sauna heats your body directly without warming the air around you. The appeal of saunas in general is that they cause reactions similar to those elicited by moderate exercise, such as vigorous sweating and increased heart rate. An infrared sauna produces these results at lower temperatures than does a regular sauna, which makes it accessible to people who can't tolerate the heat of a conventional sauna. But does that translate into tangible health benefits? Perhaps. Several studies have looked at using infrared saunas in the treatment of chronic health problems, such as high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, dementia and Alzheimer's disease, headache, type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, and found some evidence of benefit. However, larger and more-rigorous studies are needed to confirm these results. Some of these studies were also performed with patients using traditional sauna. On the other hand, no adverse effects have been reported with infrared saunas. So if you're considering trying a sauna for relaxation, an infrared sauna might be an option. Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Saunas | Healthy Living

Diabetics & Saunas | Healthy Living

There is a lot of mixed information regarding the use of saunas for diabetics. In all cases, diabetics should consult a doctor before using a sauna. Before doing so, however, it is a good idea to be informed of the benefits and concerns of saunas and diabetics. When the human body is exposed to the kind of intense heat produced by a sauna, the capillaries dilate, so the heart has to work harder to send blood to them. Because high blood pressure and other heart concerns are common for diabetics, it is clear to see the potential danger of saunas for diabetics. Additionally, saunas typically dehydrate the body by releasing sweat through the skins pores. This also poses a potential danger for diabetics. According to a 1980 study published by V.A. Koivisto in the "British Medical Journal," the rate of insulin delivery from the injection site affects the blood glucose concentration. Exercise accelerates insulin absorption, while rest can slow it. Because the blood flow in the skin is dependent on environmental temperature, the heat in saunas accelerates blood flow and, therefore, insulin absorption. Koivisto's study, which looked at diabetics in Finland who regularly take saunas, revealed that after the sauna, blood flow decreased, which slowed down insulin absorption. Infrared lighting has been shown to improve the condition of diabetic neuropathy. Infrared lighting reduces the numbing conditions and causes molecules of nitric oxide to be released from hemoglobin in the bloodstream, which, in turn, increases blood flow. This is particularly beneficial to diabetics who suffer from poor blood circulation to the feet and other extremities. Saunas with infrared lamps are also less hot than typical saunas, so the heart does not have to work so hard in these saunas to manage the Continue reading >>

Sauna Health Benefits: Are Saunas Healthy Or Harmful?

Sauna Health Benefits: Are Saunas Healthy Or Harmful?

Sauna Health Benefits: Are saunas healthy or harmful? Sweating is an impulse that goes far back in human history. About 3,000 years ago, the Mayans of Central America used sweat houses for religious ceremonies and good health. Nearly every culture has its own way of using heat for relaxation, therapy and ritual; ancient Roman baths, modern Turkish steam baths, and trendy American hot tubs are but a few examples. One of the oldest and hottest of these techniques is the sauna. Saunas have been used for thousands of years in Finland, where nearly a third of all adults take them regularly. And saunas are increasingly popular in the United States, where over one million are in use. Popularity is one thing, safety is another. Are saunas good for your health, or can they be harmful? The modern sauna is a simple unpainted room with wooden walls and benches. A rock-filled electric heater keeps the temperature at about 90 at floor level and boosts it to about 185 at the top. Unlike Turkish baths, Finnish saunas are very dry. Humidity levels are just 10% to 20%. Water drains through the floor to keep things dry. In a good sauna, an efficient ventilation system exchanges the air 3 to 8 times an hour. The dry heat has profound effects on the body. Sweating begins almost immediately. The average person will lose a pint of sweat during a brief sauna. However, it evaporates so quickly in the dry air that a person may not realize how much he is perspiring. Skin temperature soars to about 104 within minutes, but internal body temperature rises more slowly. It usually stays below 100. Changes in body temperature are easy to understand, but the heart's responses to heat are even more important. The pulse rate jumps by 30% or more. As a result, the heart nearly double the amount of blood i Continue reading >>

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