diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Risk Calculator

Findrisc Diabetes Risk Calculator

Findrisc Diabetes Risk Calculator

AS: Aortic Valve Area (Cont)Estimate aortic valve area AS: Aortic Valve Area (DVI)Estimate aortic valve area AS: Aortic Valve Area (Gorlin)Estimate aortic valve area AS: Aortic Valve Area (Hakki)Estimate aortic valve area Surgery in Asymptomatic Aortic StenosisAssess timing of surgery in severe, asymptomatic aortic stenosis Aortic Stenosis Risk ScoreEstimate risk of cardiovascular events in patients with aortic stenosis HCM Risk-SCDAssess risk of sudden cardiac death and need for ICD in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ADviSED - Aortic Dissection Detection Risk Score Plus D-Dimer for Aortic SyndromesRule out aortic dissection and other aortic syndromes Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: OBRIThe Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI) estimates risk of bleeding in AF while on oral anticoagulation. CHADS2 Score for AFAssess risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation CHA2DS2-VASc Score for AFReplacement for CHADS2 for stroke prediction in atrial fibrillation Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: HAS-BLED ScoreUnderstand the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation Warfarin Bleeding Risk - ElderlyEstimate 90 day risk of bleeding in patients on warfarin who are >65 years Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: ATRIA Estimate bleeding risk for patients on warfarin. Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: OBRIThe Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI) estimates risk of bleeding in AF while on oral anticoagulation. CRUSADE Score for Post-MI Bleeding RiskEstimate bleeding risk after NSTEMI. Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation: HAS-BLED ScoreUnderstand the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation Warfarin Bleeding Risk - ElderlyEstimate 90 day risk of bleeding in patients on warfarin who are >65 years MR: Quantification (PISA) MR: Quantification (Volum Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Test | Asian Diabetes Prevention Initiative

Diabetes Risk Test | Asian Diabetes Prevention Initiative

The following risk calculator is intended, in the context of Asian populations, to estimate an individuals risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The contents of this website are not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or offer personal medical advice. You should seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. This website is a joint initiative between the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Department of Nutrition and the National University of Singapore, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health to provide up-to-date, best practice information to the public, health and public health practitioners, business and community leaders, media, and policymakers. The contents of this website are not intended to offer personal medical advice. You should seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. Continue reading >>

Heart Health & Diabetes Risk Calculator | Nuffield Health

Heart Health & Diabetes Risk Calculator | Nuffield Health

Quite often it can be difficult to judge what effect any given lifestyle choice has on long-term health and for many of us the approach can be 'ignorant bliss' - but it doesn't have to be that way. Despite there being no crystal ball to predict whatthe future holds for each of us, we are able to apply advancements inmathematics to large-scale population data sets to gain some validated insight. The Nuffield Health Heart Health and Diabetes RiskCalculator applies this very logic. We are able to accurately estimate 10 yearrisk for all cause cardiovascular mortality as well as type 2 diabetes risk bytaking in to account an individual's clinical metrics and mapping that acrosslongitudinal data sets. According to Diabetes.co.uk, the current number of people estimated to be diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is 3.5 million , with a further 549,000 yet to be diagnosed. Meanwhile Heart UK lists coronary heart disease as the UK's number one killer . Certain inputs within this calculator drive risk scoressignificantly. For example, by indicating that you are a smoker your risk scorewill increase dramatically and conversely if you quit smoking you will see therisk drop. However when looking at the other lifestyle-driven metrics, such asblood pressure and cholesterol, small fluctuations will have minor impact whenviewed in isolation. What this calculator indicates quite clearly is that youmust view the body as a whole, and to reduce your risk over a 10-year period youhave to focus on all areas of health and wellbeing and not simply isolatedvariables. With this in mind we would recommend those actively pursuinglifestyle change use the calculator every three months. For those looking for asnapshot of their health at any given point longer intervals would be moresuited. Currently this Continue reading >>

Findrisc (finnish Diabetes Risk Score)

Findrisc (finnish Diabetes Risk Score)

Identifies patients at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Do you use the FINDRISCand want to contribute your expertise? Join our contributor team! Do you use the FINDRISCand want to contribute your expertise? Join our contributor team! Daily consumption of vegetables, fruits, or berries Lindstrm J, Tuomilehto J. The diabetes risk score: a practical tool to predict type 2 diabetes risk. Diabetes Care. 2003;26(3):725-31. Zhang L, Zhang Z, Zhang Y, Hu G, Chen L. Evaluation of Finnish Diabetes Risk Score in screening undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes among U.S. adults by gender and race: NHANES 1999-2010. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(5):e97865. Pottie K, Jaramillo A, Lewin G, et al. Recommendations on screening for type 2 diabetes in adults. CMAJ. 2012;184(15):1687-96. Jaana Lindstrm, PhD, MSC, is a researcher in the department of chronic disease prevention at the National Public Health Institute in Helsinki, Finland. Her research interests are centered around the prevention and prediction of diabetes. She has also published on nutrition and obesity. To view Dr. Jaana Lindstrm's publications, visit PubMed Jaakko Tuomilehto, MD, MA, PhD, FRCP, is chief scientific officer of Dasman Diabetes Institute in Kuwait City, Kuwait. He was previously professor emeritus of public health at the University of Helsinki in Finland and professor of vascular prevention at Danube-University Krems in Austria. Dr. Tuomilehto's research interests include epidemiology and prevention of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cancer, dementia, and cardiovascular disease. To view Dr. Jaakko Tuomilehto's publications, visit PubMed Continue reading >>

Qdiabetes-2016

Qdiabetes-2016

Welcome to the QDiabetes diabetes risk calculator Welcome to the QDiabetes diabetes Web Calculator. You can use this calculator to work out your risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes over the next ten years by answering some simple questions. It is suitable for people who do not already have a diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes. The QDiabetes algorithm has been developed by doctors and academics working in the UK National Health Service and is based on routinely collected data from many thousands of GPs across the country who have freely contributed data for medical research. QDiabetes is intended for use in the UK. Recent NICE guidance recommends that GPs and other primary healthcare professionals use a validated computer-based risk-assessment tool, such as QDiabetes, to identify people on their practice register who may be at high risk of type 2 diabetes. The tool should use routinely available data from patients' electronic health records. All medical decisions need to be taken by a patient in consultation with their doctor. The authors and the sponsors accept no responsibility for clinical use or misuse of this score. The science underpinning the QDiabetes equations has been published in the British Medical Journal, where it is known as QDScore.We've changed the name because we think that it is better. You can see the new QDiabetes-2018 calculator here: QDiabetes-2018 . Copyright 2008-16 ClinRisk Ltd. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Materials on this web site are protected by copyright law. Access to the materials on this web site for the sole purpose of personal educational and research use only. Where appropriate a single print out of a reasonable proportion of these materials may be made for personal education, research and private study. Materials should not be further copied, pho Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Test

Diabetes Risk Test

Could you have diabetes and not know it? One in four Americans with diabetes has it and doesn’t know it. Take the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Risk Test below to see if you are at risk for type 2 diabetes. A PDF version of the Diabetes Risk Test is also available here (PDF, 324 KB) . The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations. Continue reading >>

Know Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Know Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has estimated that globally as many as 193 million people, or close to half of all adults currently living with diabetes, are unaware of their disease. Most of these cases are type 2 diabetes. IDF has created an online diabetes risk assessment which aims to predict an individual’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next ten years. The test is based on the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) developed and designed by Adj. Prof Jaana Lindstrom and Prof. Jaakko Tuomilehto from the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. The test takes only a couple of minutes to complete. It is a quick, easy, and confidential way to find out your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If you are a resident of one of the countries below, click on the links to access your country-specific online risk assessment. Continue reading >>

Development And Validation Of Qdiabetes-2018 Risk Prediction Algorithm To Estimate Future Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Cohort Study

Development And Validation Of Qdiabetes-2018 Risk Prediction Algorithm To Estimate Future Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Cohort Study

Development and validation of QDiabetes-2018 risk prediction algorithm to estimate future risk of type 2 diabetes: cohort study Development and validation of QDiabetes-2018 risk prediction algorithm to estimate future risk of type 2 diabetes: cohort study BMJ 2017; 359 doi: (Published 20 November 2017) Cite this as: BMJ 2017;359:j5019 Julia Hippisley-Cox, professor of clinical epidemiology and general practice 1 2 , Carol Coupland, professor of medical statistics in primary care 1 1Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG2 7RD, UK Correspondence to: J Hippisley-Cox Julia.hippisley-cox{at}nottingham.ac.uk ObjectivesTo derive and validate updated QDiabetes-2018 prediction algorithms to estimate the 10 year risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women, taking account of potential new risk factors, and to compare their performance with current approaches. SettingRoutinely collected data from 1457 general practices in England contributing to the QResearch database: 1094 were used to develop the scores and a separate set of 363 were used to validate the scores. Participants11.5 million people aged 25-84 and free of diabetes at baseline: 8.87 million in the derivation cohort and 2.63 million in the validation cohort. MethodsCox proportional hazards models were used in the derivation cohort to derive separate risk equations in men and women for evaluation at 10 years. Risk factors considered included those already in QDiabetes (age, ethnicity, deprivation, body mass index, smoking, family history of diabetes in a first degree relative, cardiovascular disease, treated hypertension, and regular use of corticosteroids) and new risk factors: atypical antipsychotics, statins, schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder, learning disability, gestational diabetes Continue reading >>

Point-of-care Guides

Point-of-care Guides

What is the probability that an adult has undiagnosed diabetes? Early intervention with lifestyle modifications or pharmacotherapy has been shown to effectively delay or prevent type 2 diabetes in adults. 1 , 2 It is estimated that between 1999 and 2002 in the United States, 5.8 million cases of diabetes were undiagnosed and 41 million persons had prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance). 3 Several screening tools to detect undiagnosed diabetes have been developed. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that physicians consider screening patients for type 2 diabetes every three years beginning at 45 years of age, particularly in persons with a body mass index (BMI) of greater than 25 kg per m2. 4 The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening only persons with a blood pressure greater than 135/80 mm Hg. 5 The ADA approach lacks specificity because it recommends screening all adults older than 45 years, whereas the USPSTF lacks sensitivity because it would only screen patients who are hypertensive. The use of simple, inexpensive risk-assessment tools is an alternative, with the potential to be more specific while missing relatively few patients with undiagnosed diabetes. Most studies involving such tools examined non-U.S. populations, no tool was designed to simultaneously identify undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes, and many required data that are not readily available to patients. Table 1 compares the performances of various risk-assessment tools for diabetes. 6 15 Predictive performance was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve with values ranging from 0.69 to 0.85 (good to excellent discriminatory power). Positive predictive values ranged from 5.7 to 14 percent for non Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test - Risk Calculator Of Diabetes 12+

Diabetes Test - Risk Calculator Of Diabetes 12+

The Diabetes Test is a complex and precise risk calculator for developing diabetes mellitus. Using a combination of multiple test algorithms, we developed the test, which consider a wide range of factors and is able to recognize smaller nuances than any other risk calculator. After completing a brief questionnaire, you would quickly discover your potential risk of developing this chronic disease in the next 10 years. This user-friendly application excels in its simplicity of use and is a great aid for those who care about their health. You just enter the information of your age, gender, family anamnesis, physical condition, BMI, and other factors into your mobile phone. Diabetes mellitus represents one of the most frequent civilization diseases. Two basic types are recognized: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, which both develop due to an absolute or relative deficit of insulin. The diabetic thus cannot use his/her own blood glucose, which leads to increased blood sugar and other serious health consequences. Do not let diabetes take control over your life. Find out the possible risk of developing this disease and adopt the possible preventive measures in time. Modern medicine is able to cure this disease. The Diabetes Test application offers the following: Continue reading >>

Framingham Heart Study

Framingham Heart Study

The Framingham Heart Study is a project of the National Heart, Lung, & Blood Institute & Boston University. Stroke Stroke after Atrial Fibrillation Stroke or Death after Atrial Fibrillation (based on Wilson, Meigs, Sullivan, Fox, Nathan, DAgostino. Prediction of Incident Diabetes Mellitus in Middle-aged Adults: The Framingham Offspring Study, Archives of Internal Medicine 2007) Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (fasting blood glucose at or above 126 mg/dL) Average of 7-years, 8-year risk prediction Logistic Regression Model with Coefficients Blood pressure >130/85mmHG or receiving therapy HDL-C level <40 mg/dL in men or <50 mg/dL in women *Conversion from beta coefficient to predicted probability of diabetes in 8 years where z indicates regression equation with beta coefficients taken from table above (0 as intercept) and xs indicating values of corresponding risk factor (0 or 1 for each category) Point Designation based on predictors for 8-Year Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-aged Adults Continue reading >>

Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Finding out only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Before you start, grab a tape measure and scales... You must be 18 or over to complete this tool. Please note: the results will not be accurate if you are pregnant. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Assessment Calculator

Diabetes Risk Assessment Calculator

Medindia Health Calculators Diabetes Tools Diabetes Risk Assessment Calculator Diabetes is a major lifestyle disease associated with excess glucose in the blood. It is a chronic condition that occurs when the pancreas ceases to produce sufficient insulin or when the body fails to effectively use the insulin it produces. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, helps maintain normal blood glucose level. Research suggests that uncontrolled and untreated diabetes can have grave short and long-term consequences including blindness, risk of stroke, heart disease, nerve disease and kidney failure. Find out if you are at risk for developing diabetes by using the Medindia calculator. Waist Circumference is considered a risk factor for heart disease, irrespective of height and build, in the following cases: Place the tape measure directly on your skin Measure your waist by placing the tape horizontally halfway between your lowest rib and the top of your hipbone Breathe out normally and take the measurement Hold the tape tightly so as to not compress your skin What can you do to reduce the risk of diabetes? Engage in regular exercise of moderate intensity likw swimming, gardening or brisk walkin Follow a well balanced diet with low fat content If you are over 35 years of age, we recommend that you check your blood glucose level atleast once in three years Heredity or Family History: You are at a higher risk of developing diabetes if there is a history of incidence in your family, that is, if your parents, grandparents or siblings have been diagnosed with diabetes. Overweight: Keep healthy weight. Excess fatty tissue makes your cells resistant to insulin. High blood pressure: A blood pressure above 140/90 puts you at a risk of diabetes. Unhealthy eating: Unhealthy food habi Continue reading >>

From The Strong Heart Study

From The Strong Heart Study

The risk calculator below uses research data from the Strong Heart Study (Citation: DIABETES CARE. 2011;34:363-368 ) to estimate chance that a non-diabetic person who will develop diabetes in the next 4 years. It is designed for American Indians of age 35 and older. To find your estimated risk, enter your information in the calculator below. Definitions and descriptions of some terms in the calculator are provided at the bottom of the calculator. ! Important note: Some browsers with security controls may block this ActiveX control application. When they do, a yellow information bar showing the message "To help protect your security..." will appear right under the address bar. To use this calculator properly, you must remove the block by right clicking the yellow bar and select "Allow Blocked Content...". Predicting risk of developing incident diabetes (DM) defined by either fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (denoted as FPG/A1C-DM), or by HbA1c only (denoted as A1C-DM), or by FPG only (denoted as FPG-DM) in the next 4 years for a person who does not currently have FPG/A1C-DM, or A1C-DM, or FPG-DM, respectively (select one). FPG/A1C-DM A1C-DM FPG-DM Gender Male Female Age (year) Waist circumference (cm) Taking hypertension medications for high blood pressure? No Yes Systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mmHg) Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (mmHg) Do you have any of sisters or brothers who had diabetes? No Yes Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (mg/dL) Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (%) Triglycerides (TG) (mg/dL) Urinary albumin and creatinine ratio (UACR) (mg/g) Your Estimated Risk: % Definitions and Descriptions ·FPG/A1C-DM An incident FPG/A1C-DM event is defined by either having a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) >=126mg/dL, or having an hemoglobin A1c (A1C) >=6.5%. ·A1C- Continue reading >>

Cambridge Diabetes Risk Score

Cambridge Diabetes Risk Score

Predicts risk of having previously undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Use to estimate risk that patient currently has undiagnosed diabetes (i.e., NOT future risk of developing diabetes). Study cohort involved mostly white English patients, so use with caution in other populations. Most diabetes risk scores are validated against an outcome of clinically diagnosed diabetes rather than using a design in which the whole study population undergoes the diagnostic test. This leads to bias, as the variables included in risk scores are related to the patient characteristics likely to encourage doctors to undertake diagnostic testing. The Cambridge Diabetes Risk Score is validated in populations that underwent diagnostic testing to reduce this bias. Guidelines vary, but the threshold for formal screening should be lower in patients with higher risk for undiagnosed diabetes. Probability of having T2DM (HgbA1c 7.0%) = 1 / (1 + e-( + 1x1 + 2x2+ 3x3+...+ nxn)) = -6.322, and additional constants and variables are as follows: 6x6 = 0 if no diabetic 1st-degree relative 6x6= 0.728 if parent or sibling with diabetes 6x6 = 0.753 if parent and sibling with diabetes Griffin SJ, Little PS, Hales CN, Kinmonth AL, Wareham NJ. Diabetes risk score: towards earlier detection of type 2 diabetes in general practice. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2000;16(3):164-71. Why did you develop the Cambridge Diabetes Risk Score? Was there a particular clinical experience or patient encounter that inspired you to create this tool for clinicians? In the mid-1990s, it was believed that 50% of type 2 diabetes remained undiagnosed, people could have diabetes for up to 12 years before they were diagnosed, and [they] often presented with complications at the point of diagnosis. At the time, I was working on a trial among patien Continue reading >>

More in diabetes