diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Risk Assessment Template

Diabetes Uk Know Your Risk - Professionals

Diabetes Uk Know Your Risk - Professionals

Diabetes UK Know your Risk - professionals Diabetes UK Know your Risk - professionals The Diabetes UK Know Your Risk tool aims to help individuals find out their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes within the next ten years and was developed in collaboration with the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust. The 2012 NICE public health guidance Preventing type 2 diabetes: risk identification and interventions for individuals at high risk , recommended that GPs and other primary healthcare professionals use the tool for identifying people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Know Your Risk is evidence-based and consists of seven simple questions related to age, gender, ethnicity, family history, waist measurement, Body Mass Index and blood pressure. It uses a points system to identify if a person is at low, increased, moderate or high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Based on this score, advice is provided in the form of lifestyle changes or a GP referral. Know Your Risk is particularly useful for people who do not fall within the NHS Health Check age range, as anyone over the age of 18 can use it (with the exception of pregnant women) are from Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups (who are at increased risk of diabetes) are from socially deprived groups who are at greater diabetes risk and less likely to access local healthcare services. Know Your Risk should be used in preference to the finger prick test, as it takes into consideration the risk factors for diabetes. This avoids falsely reassuring people who may have a normal blood glucose level but might still be at risk of developing the condition Interested in using Diabetes UK Know your Risk in your line of work? In many cases Diabetes UK can provide you with all you need, free Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

Waist circumference measured below the ribs (usually at the level of the navel) Do you usually have daily at least 30 minutes of physical activity at work and/or during leisure time (including normal daily activity)? How often do you eat vegetables, fruit or berries? Have you ever taken medication for high blood pressure on regular basis? Have you ever been found to have high blood glucose (eg in a health examination, during an illness, during pregnancy)? Have any of the members of your immediate family or other relatives been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2)? Yes: grandparent, aunt, uncle or first cousin (but no own parent, brother, sister or child) Yes: parent, brother, sister or own child Lower than 7: estimated 1 in 100 will develop disease 711 Slightly elevated: estimated 1 in 25 will develop disease 1214 Moderate: estimated 1 in 6 will develop disease 1520 High: estimated 1 in 3 will develop disease Higher than 20: estimated 1 in 2 will develop disease Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes is LOW. It is estimated that one in 100 people with your risk profile will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within the next ten years.1 Even though you are at low risk, it is important that you maintain a healthy weight by eating healthy and keeping active, especially as you get older.2 Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes is SLIGHTLY ELEVATED. It is estimated that one in 25 people with your risk profile will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within the next ten years.1 Although you cannot change your age or genes, there are a few small changes that you can make to reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Improving what you eat and being more physically active are all actions you can take to lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.2 Your risk of devel Continue reading >>

Department Of Health

Department Of Health

Australian type 2 diabetes risk assessment tool (AUSDRISK) / Diabetes risk assessment to be completed by the patient or with the assistance of a health professional or practice nurse. The Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool was developed by the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute on behalf of the Australian, state and territory governments as part of the COAG initiative to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. By answering the following questions you will be able to calculate your risk of type 2 diabetes in the next 5 years. If you have problems accessing this interactive version of the tool, or if you rely on assistive technology (such as a screenreader), you may use the non-interactive version of the diabetes risk assessment tool. 3a. Are you of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander or Maori descent? Asia (including the Indian sub-continent), Middle East, North Africa, Southern Europe [2 points] 4. Have either of your parents, or any of your brothers or sisters been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2)? 5. Have you ever been found to have high blood glucose (sugar) (for example, in a health examination, during an illness, or during pregnancy)? 6. Are you currently taking medication for high blood pressure? 7. Do you currently smoke cigarettes or any other tobacco products on a daily basis? 8. How often do you eat vegetables or fruit? 9. On average, would you say you do at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week (for example, 30 minutes a day on 5 or more days a week)? *10a. Your waist measurement (in cm) taken below the ribs (usually at the level of the navel, and while standing) The correct place to measure your waist is halfway between your lowest rib and the top of your hipbone, roughly in line with your navel. Measure direc Continue reading >>

Risk Assessment Tool For Type 2 Diabetes (ausdrisk)

Risk Assessment Tool For Type 2 Diabetes (ausdrisk)

Risk assessment tool for type 2 diabetes (AUSDRISK) Risk assessment tool for type 2 diabetes (AUSDRISK) All fields are required. Please complete all sections to calculate your risk. 3a. Are you Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander or Maori descent? Asia (including the Indian sub-continent), Middle East, North Africa, Southern Europe 4. Have either of your parents, or any of your brothers or sisters been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2)? Please complete this section to calculate your risk 5. Have you ever been found to have high blood glucose (sugar) (for example, in a health examination, during an illness, during pregnancy)? Please complete this section to calculate your risk 6. Are you currently taking medication for high blood pressure? Please complete this section to calculate your risk 7. Do you currently smoke cigarettes or any other tobacco products on a daily basis? Please complete this section to calculate your risk 8. How often do you eat vegetables or fruit? Please complete this section to calculate your risk 9. On average, would you say you do at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week (for example, 30 minutes a day on 5 or more days a week)? Please complete this section to calculate your risk 10a. Your waist measurement taken below the ribs (usually at the level of the navel, and while standing) cm. Please enter your waist measurement (between 2 and 3 characters). Please complete this section to calculate your risk 10b. Are you of Asian or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent? Please complete this section to calculate your risk For those of Asian or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent: For all others (i.e. not of Asian or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent): Your score is . This puts you in a catego Continue reading >>

Conduct A Health Risk Assessment

Conduct A Health Risk Assessment

To receive email updates about Diabetes at Work (DAW) enter your email address: Conduct a Health Risk Assessment or Employee Health Survey Conduct a health risk assessment (HRA) or employee health survey to gain information about the current health status of employees, their health concerns and goals. Worksite interventions may use an assessment of health risks with feedback (AHRF) alone or as part of a broader worksite health promotion program that includes health education and other health promotion components offered as follow-up to the HRA. The Community Guide to Prevention Services defines the use of HRA and feedback as follows: An assessment of personal health habits and risk factors (that may be used in combination with biomedical measurements of physiologic health). A quantitative estimation or qualitative assessment of future risk of death and other adverse health outcomes. Provision of feedback in the form of educational messages and counseling that describes how changing one or more behavioral risk factors might change the risk of disease or death. Employee health risk assessments or health surveys help individuals to: Identify steps they can take to improve their health. For employers, an employee health risk assessment or health survey can help to: Provide an overall indication of wellness across the company. Identify opportunities to reduce future health care cost through early intervention and risk reduction. Contribute to goal setting, designing, and evaluating your worksite wellness program and diabetes prevention and management efforts. Serve as a critical element of the business case for management. Assessment or survey results can be sorted by employee characteristics such as age, race and ethnicity, type of job function, height, weight and health c Continue reading >>

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics When an individual with diabetes is assessed for safety risk there are several aspects that must be considered. Codefree Blood Glucose Monitor/Monitoring Test/Testing Kit+Strips+Lancets+Case in mmol/L A single blood glucose test result only gives information about an individuals blood glucose level at one particular point in time. Because blood glucose levels fluctuate throughout the day (this is also true for people without diabetes), one test result is of no use in assessing the overall health of a person with diabetes. The results of a series of self-monitored blood glucose measurements over a period of time, however, can give valuable information about an individuals diabetes health. Blood glucose records should be assessed by a health care professional with expertise in diabetes . Blood Sugar Journal: Keep Record of Your Blood Sugar Often, a key factor in assessing employment safety and risk is documentation of incidents of severe hypoglycemia. An individual who has managed his or her diabetes over an extended period of time without experiencing severe hypoglycemia is unlikely to experience this condition in the future. Multiple incidents of severe hypoglycemia may in some situations be disqualifying for high-risk occupations. However, the circumstances of each incident should be examined, as some incidents can be explained due to changes in insulin dosage, illness, or other factors and thus will be unlikely to recur or have already been addressed by the individual through changes to his or her diabetes treatment regimen or education. Some individuals over time lose the ability to recognize the early warning signs of hypoglycemia. These diabetics are at increased risk f Continue reading >>

Know Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Know Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has estimated that globally as many as 193 million people, or close to half of all adults currently living with diabetes, are unaware of their disease. Most of these cases are type 2 diabetes. IDF has created an online diabetes risk assessment which aims to predict an individual’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next ten years. The test is based on the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) developed and designed by Adj. Prof Jaana Lindstrom and Prof. Jaakko Tuomilehto from the National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. The test takes only a couple of minutes to complete. It is a quick, easy, and confidential way to find out your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If you are a resident of one of the countries below, click on the links to access your country-specific online risk assessment. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Risk Assessment

Diabetic Risk Assessment

There is no such thing as a "stupid" or "daft" health and safety question! Post by jonathanmccomb Wed Aug 23, 2006 1:02 pm Am I correct in thinking that we need to complete a risk assessment for diabetics? If anyone has any info or templates on this, please PM me Post by eure_maum Wed Aug 23, 2006 1:52 pm Can't help you but this topic caught my eye considering Diabetes runs in my family and am currently living with my sister-in-law who is a diabetic and is a safety auditor here at my job. Post by Ashanti Wed Aug 23, 2006 2:34 pm I might be wrong but I don't think diabetese is an illness which automatically needs a specific risk assessment itself but would come under an assessment for DDA if an issue is identified. Post by eure_maum Wed Aug 23, 2006 3:32 pm Post by Ian Blenkharn Wed Aug 23, 2006 3:44 pm Lots of practical issues if your colleague is an insulin-dependent diabetic - they need somewhere to take food and drink quickly if needed, somewhere to infect and store their insulin (though insulin pens are now really simple and self-contained). Brittle diabetics in poor control may have sudden problems that can create additional hazards in hazardous situations. The BDA should be a source of good advice, though in practicality the Americal Diabetic Association seems to offer more practical advice - I was recently diagnosed with diabetes and took a look just a few weeks ago. Might also be issues for your first-aiders who could usefully update their skills for dealing with diabetic emergencies. Your colleague will (should) get lots of advice from the NHS Diabetes service via the local hospital or GP. Will be best to work with them (vai your colleague, not directly) to benefit from that information. Post by raymondo Wed Aug 23, 2006 9:37 pm I too have been diagnosed diabe Continue reading >>

Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Finding out only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Before you start, grab a tape measure and scales... You must be 18 or over to complete this tool. Please note: the results will not be accurate if you are pregnant. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assesment

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assesment

Home > Services > Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assesment Type 2 Diabetes risk evaluation for 40-49 year old at high risk of developing type 2 Diabetes. High risk is determined following the patients completion of the Australian type 2 diabetes risk assessment tool. Evaluation of a high risk score determined by the Australian type 2 diabetes risk assessment tool, which has been completed by the patient within a period of 3 months prior to undertaking the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Evaluation service; Updating patient history and undertaking examinations and investigations in accordance with relevant guidelines Making an overall assessment of the patients risk factors, relevant examinations and the results of any investigations; Initiating interventions where appropriate, including referrals and follow-up relating to the management of any risk factors identified; Providing advice and information (such as Lifescripts resources) to the patient including strategies to achieve lifestyle and behaviour changes where appropriate. Print and complete the form The Australian type 2 diabetes risk assessement tool If you scored 12 points or more in the AUSDRISK you may have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes or be at high risk of developing the disease. See your doctor about having a fasting blood glucose test. Act now to prevent type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Workplace

Diabetes In The Workplace

Published 14/01/2015 12.26 PM | Updated 14/03/2018 10.03 AM How might diabetes affect a person at work? In the UK there are approximately 3.2 million people diagnosed with diabetes, and an estimated 630,000 people who have the condition and do not know it Whilst there is no reason why patients with diabetes should not continue to work, they should comply with recommended medical treatment, monitoring and supervision and report any deterioration in the control of their condition to you or their Diabetes Support Team. What are the employers responsibilities? For most people with diabetes the illness does not affect their ability to do their job and, under the Equality Act 2010 , it is unlawful for employers to operate a blanket ban on the recruitment of people with diabetes. Some jobs, however, especially those involving safety-critical activities (e.g. police, fire and ambulance services) should now be subject to individual medical assessments. There are also restrictions in place for jobs involving some driving duties including large goods vehicles (LGVs) or passenger-carrying vehicles, so occupational health advice should be sought on the suitability of employees to undertake such duties. Patients with diabetes may struggle with undertaking shift work due to the changes to the timing of medication and diet. Further advice on fitness to work should be sought if an employee with diabetes feels unable to cope with the demands of shift and night work. It is essential that employers undertake a risk assessment in collaboration with the employee. The assessment must include consideration of the following: Whether the person will have access to regular meal breaks. The level and regularity of activity undertaken in the course of the persons duties as this affects circulating Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Test

Diabetes Risk Test

Could you have diabetes and not know it? One in four Americans with diabetes has it and doesn’t know it. Take the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Risk Test below to see if you are at risk for type 2 diabetes. A PDF version of the Diabetes Risk Test is also available here (PDF, 324 KB) . The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations. Continue reading >>

Leicester Diabetes Centre | The-leicester-diabetes-risk-score

Leicester Diabetes Centre | The-leicester-diabetes-risk-score

The Leicester Practice Risk Score is recommended by NICE and used by Diabetes UK for the identification of those at risk of diabetes. The score identifies people who may be at high risk of diabetes or currently have undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes using data on age, sex, BMI, ethnicity, family history of diabetes and anti-hypertensive use. This software calculates the risk score for all those aged between 18 and 75 years old excluding people with known diabetes, the terminally ill and those coded with gestational diabetes using the data stored within your practices electronic medical records. The software also analyses any existing OGTT/HbA1c/glucose data as many people will have been screened already and also to identify anyone who may have existing diabetes which has been missed. The software outputs an Excel spreadsheet which enables you to rank those stored within your practice records by risk. This allows you to invite those at greatest risk for screening, for example you could initially invite within the top 10% in your practice. The .exe file can be accessed here: LPRS2a.exe Continue reading >>

Risk Models And Scores For Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review

Risk Models And Scores For Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review

Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review BMJ 2011; 343 doi: (Published 28 November 2011) Cite this as: BMJ 2011;343:d7163 1Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London E1 2AT, UK Correspondence to: D Noble d.noble{at}qmul.ac.uk Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but no Continue reading >>

Diabetic Risk Assessment Template

Diabetic Risk Assessment Template

#1 Posted : 28 October 2014 08:17:06(UTC) Hi all,If anyone has a template for staff member with Diabetes they could send me it would be most appreciated.Obviously I will amend and remove any personal details if present. Thanks for your time. Chris #2 Posted : 28 October 2014 08:47:42(UTC) I'm afraid that you are going to have to do the leg work on this one. Although diabetes affects a lot of people, different people react to it differently and you will need to sit down and have the discussion with the employee as to how the diabetes affects them, what their medication is, whether they are type 1 or type 2, side effects of this medication, extreme fatigue, whether their diabetes is under control, how often they see the doctor, do they need additional eye tests, special safety shoes, any other side effects or health effects of diabetes and so on and so forth.A template will not substitute for good old fashioned research and you do need to know what you are talking about so the risk assessment under the Equality Act is completed by a competent person, otherwise it is genuinely not worth the paper it is written on. #6 Posted : 05 November 2014 08:31:48(UTC) Good point Ian We do not use our risk assessment for diabetes to see if the person has any particular health and safety issues, we use it as an assessment under the Equality Act to see if they need any reasonable adjustments and how the organisation can help them to lead a "normal" life. If the diabetes is disclosed, then an assessment of some sort should be made and why not do a risk assessment? It's as good as approach as any and kills quite a lot of birds with just the one stone.Hils #7 Posted : 05 November 2014 18:11:23(UTC) If you are considering a risk assessment in response to the requirement under the management Continue reading >>

More in diabetes