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Diabetes Risk Assessment At Work Template

Department Of Health

Department Of Health

Australian type 2 diabetes risk assessment tool (AUSDRISK) / Diabetes risk assessment to be completed by the patient or with the assistance of a health professional or practice nurse. The Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool was developed by the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute on behalf of the Australian, state and territory governments as part of the COAG initiative to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. By answering the following questions you will be able to calculate your risk of type 2 diabetes in the next 5 years. If you have problems accessing this interactive version of the tool, or if you rely on assistive technology (such as a screenreader), you may use the non-interactive version of the diabetes risk assessment tool. 3a. Are you of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander or Maori descent? Asia (including the Indian sub-continent), Middle East, North Africa, Southern Europe [2 points] 4. Have either of your parents, or any of your brothers or sisters been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2)? 5. Have you ever been found to have high blood glucose (sugar) (for example, in a health examination, during an illness, or during pregnancy)? 6. Are you currently taking medication for high blood pressure? 7. Do you currently smoke cigarettes or any other tobacco products on a daily basis? 8. How often do you eat vegetables or fruit? 9. On average, would you say you do at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week (for example, 30 minutes a day on 5 or more days a week)? *10a. Your waist measurement (in cm) taken below the ribs (usually at the level of the navel, and while standing) The correct place to measure your waist is halfway between your lowest rib and the top of your hipbone, roughly in line with your navel. Measure direc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Management Workplace Health Ict

Diabetes Prevention Management Workplace Health Ict

Prevention and Mangement of Diabetes in the Workplace One of the single biggest forces threatening the U.S. workforce productivity, health care affordability and quality of life is the rise in chronic conditions. It is estimated that chronic diseases account for 75% of all health care costs and 70% of all Kansas deaths. (1) Of those chronic diseases, diabetes ranks high in terms of prevalence, growth and cost: One in 10 Kansas adults have been diagnosed with diabetes and another 1 in 14 have been diagnosed with prediabetes. (2) Even more alarming is the fact that 9 out of 10 people with prediabetes dont even know they have it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that by 2050, 1 in 3 American adults will be impacted by diabetes. People with diagnosed diabetes incur 2.3 times the medical expenses of comparable people without diabetes. (3) Add to that number the costs associated with reduced productivity, increased absenteeism and turnover, and can be a recipe for financial disaster for every employer. As stewards of health benefits, employers are in a unique position to assist employees and their family members in identifying and managing prediabetes and diabetes. This toolkit has been assembled to help your company get started. Your group can select different parts and pieces from the menu of tools and resources, depending on the needs of your organization. If you need a helping hand, the partners who put this kit together are just a phone call away. To schedule a meeting to discuss preventing and managing diabetes in your worksite, contact Juliane Walker or call 316-683-9441. Continue reading >>

Risk Models And Scores For Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review

Risk Models And Scores For Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review

Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review BMJ 2011; 343 doi: (Published 28 November 2011) Cite this as: BMJ 2011;343:d7163 1Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London E1 2AT, UK Correspondence to: D Noble d.noble{at}qmul.ac.uk Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but no Continue reading >>

Nurse Practitioner Perceptions Of A Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool In The Retail Clinic Setting

Nurse Practitioner Perceptions Of A Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool In The Retail Clinic Setting

Nurse Practitioner Perceptions of a Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool in the Retail Clinic Setting University of Alabama, Capstone College of Nursing, Tuscaloosa, AL Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. IN BRIEF This article describes a study to gain insight into the utility and perceived feasibility of the American Diabetes Associations Diabetes Risk Test (DRT) implemented by nurse practitioners (NPs) in the retail clinic setting. The DRT is intended for those without a known risk for diabetes. Researchers invited 1,097 NPs working in the retail clinics of a nationwide company to participate voluntarily in an online questionnaire. Of the 248 NPs who sent in complete responses, 114 (46%) indicated that they used the DRT in the clinic. Overall mean responses from these NPs indicated that they perceive the DRT as a feasible tool in the retail clinic setting. Use of the DRT or similar risk assessment tools in the retail clinic setting can aid in the identification of people at risk for type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, burdening society with high costs for treatment and placing increased demand on the health care system ( 1 ). According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report, an estimated 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million of them are undiagnosed ( 2 ). The lack of screening for early identification of patients at risk for type 2 diabetes is a significant clinical problem. Health care providers (HCPs) need to be aware of the increasing diabetes bu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Risk Assessment

Diabetic Risk Assessment

There is no such thing as a "stupid" or "daft" health and safety question! Post by jonathanmccomb Wed Aug 23, 2006 1:02 pm Am I correct in thinking that we need to complete a risk assessment for diabetics? If anyone has any info or templates on this, please PM me Post by eure_maum Wed Aug 23, 2006 1:52 pm Can't help you but this topic caught my eye considering Diabetes runs in my family and am currently living with my sister-in-law who is a diabetic and is a safety auditor here at my job. Post by Ashanti Wed Aug 23, 2006 2:34 pm I might be wrong but I don't think diabetese is an illness which automatically needs a specific risk assessment itself but would come under an assessment for DDA if an issue is identified. Post by eure_maum Wed Aug 23, 2006 3:32 pm Post by Ian Blenkharn Wed Aug 23, 2006 3:44 pm Lots of practical issues if your colleague is an insulin-dependent diabetic - they need somewhere to take food and drink quickly if needed, somewhere to infect and store their insulin (though insulin pens are now really simple and self-contained). Brittle diabetics in poor control may have sudden problems that can create additional hazards in hazardous situations. The BDA should be a source of good advice, though in practicality the Americal Diabetic Association seems to offer more practical advice - I was recently diagnosed with diabetes and took a look just a few weeks ago. Might also be issues for your first-aiders who could usefully update their skills for dealing with diabetic emergencies. Your colleague will (should) get lots of advice from the NHS Diabetes service via the local hospital or GP. Will be best to work with them (vai your colleague, not directly) to benefit from that information. Post by raymondo Wed Aug 23, 2006 9:37 pm I too have been diagnosed diabe Continue reading >>

Different Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessments Predict Dissimilar Numbers At ‘high Risk’: A Retrospective Analysis Of Diabetes Risk-assessment Tools

Different Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessments Predict Dissimilar Numbers At ‘high Risk’: A Retrospective Analysis Of Diabetes Risk-assessment Tools

Background Use of a validated risk-assessment tool to identify individuals at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes is currently recommended. It is under-reported, however, whether a different risk tool alters the predicted risk of an individual. Aim This study explored any differences between commonly used validated risk-assessment tools for type 2 diabetes. Design and setting Cross-sectional analysis of individuals who participated in a workplace-based risk assessment in Carmarthenshire, South Wales. Method Retrospective analysis of 676 individuals (389 females and 287 males) who participated in a workplace-based diabetes risk-assessment initiative. Ten-year risk of type 2 diabetes was predicted using the validated QDiabetes®, Leicester Risk Assessment (LRA), FINDRISC, and Cambridge Risk Score (CRS) algorithms. Results Differences between the risk-assessment tools were apparent following retrospective analysis of individuals. CRS categorised the highest proportion (13.6%) of individuals at ‘high risk’ followed by FINDRISC (6.6%), QDiabetes (6.1%), and, finally, the LRA was the most conservative risk tool (3.1%). Following further analysis by sex, over one-quarter of males were categorised at high risk using CRS (25.4%), whereas a greater percentage of females were categorised as high risk using FINDRISC (7.8%). Conclusion The adoption of a different valid risk-assessment tool can alter the predicted risk of an individual and caution should be used to identify those individuals who really are at high risk of type 2 diabetes. The number of individuals estimated to be living with diabetes in the UK is projected to rise to 3 646 000 by the year 2030, which would see an average increase of 31 000 new cases annually.1 The National Institute for Health and Care Excell Continue reading >>

Limited Effectiveness Of Diabetes Risk Assessment Tools In Seniors Facility Residents

Limited Effectiveness Of Diabetes Risk Assessment Tools In Seniors Facility Residents

Volume 20, Issue 3 , March 2017, Pages 329-335 Limited Effectiveness of Diabetes Risk Assessment Tools in Seniors Facility Residents Undiagnosed diabetes can create significant management issues for seniors. To evaluate the effectiveness of two diabetes risk surveysthe Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire (CANRISK) and the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC)to identify elevated blood glucose levels in seniors. A cross-sectional study was conducted in senior living facilities in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Those with known diabetes, without capacity, considered frail, or unable to communicate in English were excluded. Participants completed the CANRISK and FINDRISC surveys and had their glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measured. Correlations between seniors with elevated risk on the surveys and an HbA1c value of 6.5% or higher or 6.0% and higher were assessed. In this study, 290 residents participated; their mean age was 84.3 7.3 years, 82 (28%) were men, and their mean HbA1c level was 5.7% 0.4%. Mean CANRISK score was 29.4 8.0, and of the 254 (88%) considered to be moderate or high risk, 10 (4%) had an HbA1c level of 6.5% or higher and 49 (19%) had an HbA1c level of 6.0% or higher. Mean FINDRISC score was 10.8 4.2, and of the 58 (20%) considered to be high or very high risk, 4 (7%) had an HbA1c level of 6.5% or higher and 15 (26%) had an HbA1c level of 6.0% or higher. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.420.72) for the CANRISK survey identifying participants with an HbA1c level of 6.5% or higher and 0.59 (95% confidence interval 0.510.67) for identifying participants with an HbA1c level of 6.0% or higher. Similar characteristics were observed for the FINDRISC survey. In this group of seniors with no Continue reading >>

Baseline Diabetes Assessment-simple

Baseline Diabetes Assessment-simple

Asia (including the Indian sub-continent), Middle East, North Africa, Southern Europe Have either of your parents, or any of your brothers or sisters been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2)? Have you ever been found to have high blood glucose (sugar) (for example, in a health examination, during an illness, during pregnancy)? Are you currently taking medication for high blood pressure? Do you currently smoke cigarettes or any other tobacco products on a daily basis? On average, would you say you do at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week (for example, 30 minutes a day on 5 or more days a week)? How often do you eat vegetables or fruit? Your Waist Measurement - taken below the ribs (usually at the level of the navel, and while standing) The correct place to measure your waist is halfway between your lowest rib and the top of your hipbone, roughly in line with your navel. Measure directly against your skin, breathe out normally, make sure the tape is snug, without compressing the skin. Make a note of your waist measurement and score as below.The correct place to measure your waist is halfway between your lowest rib and the top of your hipbone, roughly in line with your navel. Measure directly against your skin, breathe out normally, make sure the tape is snug, without compressing the skin. Make a note of your waist measurement and score as below. For those of Asian or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent: Continue reading >>

Diabetic Risk Assessment Template

Diabetic Risk Assessment Template

#1 Posted : 28 October 2014 08:17:06(UTC) Hi all,If anyone has a template for staff member with Diabetes they could send me it would be most appreciated.Obviously I will amend and remove any personal details if present. Thanks for your time. Chris #2 Posted : 28 October 2014 08:47:42(UTC) I'm afraid that you are going to have to do the leg work on this one. Although diabetes affects a lot of people, different people react to it differently and you will need to sit down and have the discussion with the employee as to how the diabetes affects them, what their medication is, whether they are type 1 or type 2, side effects of this medication, extreme fatigue, whether their diabetes is under control, how often they see the doctor, do they need additional eye tests, special safety shoes, any other side effects or health effects of diabetes and so on and so forth.A template will not substitute for good old fashioned research and you do need to know what you are talking about so the risk assessment under the Equality Act is completed by a competent person, otherwise it is genuinely not worth the paper it is written on. #6 Posted : 05 November 2014 08:31:48(UTC) Good point Ian We do not use our risk assessment for diabetes to see if the person has any particular health and safety issues, we use it as an assessment under the Equality Act to see if they need any reasonable adjustments and how the organisation can help them to lead a "normal" life. If the diabetes is disclosed, then an assessment of some sort should be made and why not do a risk assessment? It's as good as approach as any and kills quite a lot of birds with just the one stone.Hils #7 Posted : 05 November 2014 18:11:23(UTC) If you are considering a risk assessment in response to the requirement under the management Continue reading >>

Working With Diabetes

Working With Diabetes

Health , Risk assessment , Risk assessment More than two million people in the UK suffer from diabetes and around 300 more are diagnosed each day. However, many of us don't know what causes the condition and how serious it can be. Becky Allen considers the workplace implications of a common but much-misunderstood condition. For such a common condition - more than two million people in the UK suffer from it and around 300 more are diagnosed each day - diabetes is surrounded by myths and misconceptions. We may know that diabetics can suffer from so-called "hypos" - and that when they do, they need sugar - but many of us don't know what causes the condition, how serious it can be, and what impact diabetes has in the workplace. According to Caroline Butler, a care advisor at the charity Diabetes UK, "A common myth is that, compared with type 1 diabetes, type 2 is mild. In fact, both types are serious because they can lead to long-term complications like heart disease, kidney disease, increased risk of stroke, and blindness. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population." Perhaps because of misconceptions about the condition, until recently people with diabetes were often actively discriminated against at work: having diabetes meant an automatic bar to careers in some professions, including the emergency services. But changes to the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) in 2004 mean only the armed forces remain exempt from the Act's provisions. Diabetes UK believes that while discrimination still occurs, many employers are getting the message that if the condition is well controlled, people with diabetes are able to do almost all jobs safely. "There was a huge blanket ban on some professions, but since 2004 there's been a massive improvement," says Continue reading >>

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics

Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics Employment Safety Risk Assessment For Diabetics When an individual with diabetes is assessed for safety risk there are several aspects that must be considered. Codefree Blood Glucose Monitor/Monitoring Test/Testing Kit+Strips+Lancets+Case in mmol/L A single blood glucose test result only gives information about an individuals blood glucose level at one particular point in time. Because blood glucose levels fluctuate throughout the day (this is also true for people without diabetes), one test result is of no use in assessing the overall health of a person with diabetes. The results of a series of self-monitored blood glucose measurements over a period of time, however, can give valuable information about an individuals diabetes health. Blood glucose records should be assessed by a health care professional with expertise in diabetes . Blood Sugar Journal: Keep Record of Your Blood Sugar Often, a key factor in assessing employment safety and risk is documentation of incidents of severe hypoglycemia. An individual who has managed his or her diabetes over an extended period of time without experiencing severe hypoglycemia is unlikely to experience this condition in the future. Multiple incidents of severe hypoglycemia may in some situations be disqualifying for high-risk occupations. However, the circumstances of each incident should be examined, as some incidents can be explained due to changes in insulin dosage, illness, or other factors and thus will be unlikely to recur or have already been addressed by the individual through changes to his or her diabetes treatment regimen or education. Some individuals over time lose the ability to recognize the early warning signs of hypoglycemia. These diabetics are at increased risk f Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Workplace

Diabetes In The Workplace

Published 14/01/2015 12.26 PM | Updated 14/03/2018 10.03 AM How might diabetes affect a person at work? In the UK there are approximately 3.2 million people diagnosed with diabetes, and an estimated 630,000 people who have the condition and do not know it Whilst there is no reason why patients with diabetes should not continue to work, they should comply with recommended medical treatment, monitoring and supervision and report any deterioration in the control of their condition to you or their Diabetes Support Team. What are the employers responsibilities? For most people with diabetes the illness does not affect their ability to do their job and, under the Equality Act 2010 , it is unlawful for employers to operate a blanket ban on the recruitment of people with diabetes. Some jobs, however, especially those involving safety-critical activities (e.g. police, fire and ambulance services) should now be subject to individual medical assessments. There are also restrictions in place for jobs involving some driving duties including large goods vehicles (LGVs) or passenger-carrying vehicles, so occupational health advice should be sought on the suitability of employees to undertake such duties. Patients with diabetes may struggle with undertaking shift work due to the changes to the timing of medication and diet. Further advice on fitness to work should be sought if an employee with diabetes feels unable to cope with the demands of shift and night work. It is essential that employers undertake a risk assessment in collaboration with the employee. The assessment must include consideration of the following: Whether the person will have access to regular meal breaks. The level and regularity of activity undertaken in the course of the persons duties as this affects circulating Continue reading >>

What Employers Can Do To Manage Type 2 Diabetes In The Workplace

What Employers Can Do To Manage Type 2 Diabetes In The Workplace

What employers can do to manage Type 2 diabetes in the workplace Its estimated that over 30 million Americans approximately 1 in 10 have diabetes. About 1.25 million have Type 1 Diabetes, and the remainder have Type 2. Of the 30 million with diabetes, over 7 million have yet to be diagnosed. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., with over 300,000 death certificates citing the disease as an underlying or contributing cause. And more cases are on the way:1.5 million new diabetes diagnoses are made in the U.S. every year, and in 2015, 84.1 million Americans 18 and older had prediabetes. According to the Health Care Cost Institute ,the annual cost for diabetic care is significant: over $10,000 more per year than without the disease. For employers, employees and dependents, the annual costs continue to rise: $14,999 annually for people with diabetes; $4,305 annually for people without diabetes; $15,456 for children (018) with diabetes; $16,889 annually for pre-Medicare adults (5564) with diabetes; $1,922 annual out-of-pocket medical spending for people with diabetes; and $738 annual out-of-pocket medical spending for people without diabetes. In 2012, the annual cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. for employers amounted to $245 billion, including $176 billion in direct medical costs and $69 billion in reduced productivity.About 1 in 3 adults has prediabetes (86 million Americans), but 9 out of 10 are not even aware they have it. Prediabetics can develop the disease within five years. For most people, Type 2 diabetes occurs later in life, typically after age 40. But gestational diabetes can be a precursor for women to develop Type 2 diabetes after the birth of their child. While coverage for diabetes is included in virtually every employer-sponsored healt Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Risk Assessment: Improvement By Follow-up Measurements In Young Islet Autoantibody-positive Relatives

Type 1 Diabetes Risk Assessment: Improvement By Follow-up Measurements In Young Islet Autoantibody-positive Relatives

, Volume 49, Issue12 , pp 29692976 | Cite as Type 1 diabetes risk assessment: improvement by follow-up measurements in young islet autoantibody-positive relatives Combinations of autoantibody characteristics, including antibody number, titre, subclass and epitope have been shown to stratify type 1 diabetes risk in islet autoantibody-positive relatives. The aim of this study was to determine whether autoantibody characteristics change over time, the nature of such changes, and their implications for the development of diabetes. Five-hundred and thirteen follow-up samples from 141 islet autoantibody-positive first-degree relatives were tested for islet autoantibody titre, IgG subclass, and GAD and IA-2 antibody epitope. All samples were categorised according to four risk stratification models. Relatives had a median follow-up of 6.8years and 48 developed diabetes during follow-up. Survival analysis was used to determine the probability of change in risk category and of progression to diabetes. For each stratification model, the majority of relatives (7181%) remained in the same risk category throughout follow-up. In the remainder, changes occurred both from lower to higher and from higher to lower risk categories. For all four models, relatives aged < 15years were more likely to change risk category than those aged >15years (0.001 < p < 0.03). Relatives whose autoantibody status changed from low- to high-risk categories had a higher risk of diabetes than relatives who remained in low-risk categories, and inclusion of autoantibody status during follow-up improved diabetes risk stratification in Cox proportional hazards models (p < 0.001). Changes in islet autoantibodies are relevant to pathogenesis, and are likely to signal alterations in the disease process. Detection of Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Recent statistics indicate that 3.5 million people in the UK have diabetes, while an estimated half a million additional people have the condition but are unaware that they have it. The number of people with diabetes in the UK is expected to rise to more than 5 million by 2025. Currently, the condition costs the NHS around £10 billion a year. Diabetes is a chronic condition whereby the body is not able to regulate its glucose levels due to abnormal metabolism. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 is the less common of the two. In this condition, the body is not able to make insulin on its own to manage blood glucose levels. It usually affects children and young adults. Type 2 is much more common and mainly affects adults. In this condition, the body doesn't produce enough insulin to manage blood glucose levels and/or the cells in the body can’t use it correctly. Although not fully understood, certain factors increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. These include; age, weight, body fat distribution, lack of physical activity, family history and ethnicity. It's a very common lifelong health condition that doesn’t hinder people’s ability to get a job or to keep one. People with diabetes should be assessed on their individual ability to do a job and not be discriminated against simply because they have the condition. Nevertheless, some key areas of employment have restrictions on people with insulin-dependent diabetes. These include: driving long goods vehicles or those carrying passengers, i.e. jobs where people need to have a Group 2 licence the armed forces jobs in the aviation industry, such as airline pilots and, in some cases, cabin crew and air traffic control personnel working offshore, for example on oil rigs and ships. There can also be restrictions in Continue reading >>

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